3

power /ˈpaʊə(r)/ (OALD)
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Do you pronounce power's vowels in order of (1) -> (2) -> (3) or other ways?

IPA chart

7
  • 1
    Where did you get this diagram from? Moreover, there are only two vowels in "power," so why are referring to three vowels in the diagram? (I'm confused.)
    – J.R.
    Aug 31, 2013 at 0:56
  • @J.R. I added pronunciation marks from OALD, and the chart is from IPA on Wikipedia.
    – Listenever
    Aug 31, 2013 at 1:51
  • Are you asking because you think the dictionary may be mistaken? If so, can you explain what made you think so?
    – user230
    Aug 31, 2013 at 2:01
  • 6
    I think I see what's going on here: when I say the first syllable of power (i.e., the pow, rhymes with cow), the "ow" sound (represented by ) requires me to make a shift with my mouth. In slow motion, it would start with the pa sound (as in "pal"), with my mouth open, and then my mouth would need to form a small 'o' with my lips, as I began to say the "w" sound (ʊ). So, the answer to your question is yes, I go 1-2-3 as you have diagrammed it. But this is a rather "advanced" way to look at vowel pronunciation; I think most natives do this without thinking about it.
    – J.R.
    Aug 31, 2013 at 2:07
  • 2
    Hey, but if you can learn to work this way, then it will really help you learn languages that have vowels that you didn't grow up with--and that's one of the hardest things to do. And, yes, I also produce the sound as in your chart. Some of my relatives in Georgia just go 1-3, but that is not something you want to imitate! :-) Sep 24, 2013 at 17:31

1 Answer 1

1

When I say the first syllable of “power” (i.e., the pow, rhymes with cow), the "ow" sound (represented by ) requires me to make a shift with my mouth. In slow motion, it would start with the pa sound (as in "pal"), with my mouth open, and then my mouth would need to form a small 'o' with my lips, as I began to say the "w" sound (ʊ). So, the answer to your question is yes, I go 1-2-3 as you have diagrammed it. But this is a rather "advanced" way to look at vowel pronunciation; I think most natives do this without thinking about it.

(J.R, here)

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