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I explain this word by an example:

a person who recently became someone important or rich but, he behaves very pretentiously such a way that one might think he was rich or important for many years. For example, a beggar who finds a million dollars on the street by chance and next day, he starts to sneer at the indigent.

In Persian language we call it "تازه به دوران رسیده".

Is there equivalent for this word in English?

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    I am not sure about the English variant, but the Persian term is "ندید بدید" rather than "ندید پدید" – Cardinal Jul 11 '16 at 8:22
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    Also, the Persian terms is not used in cases similar to what you provided in your example sentence. "ندید بدید" or "تازه به دوران رسیده" is used to describe a person who recently became important or rich but, he behaves very pretentiously such a way that one might think he was rich or important many years. For example, a beggar who finds a million dollars on the street and by chance. Next day, he starts to sneer the indigent. – Cardinal Jul 11 '16 at 8:31
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    Is he unable to peel the rind properly to get at the fruit, or does not know how to eat it, because he is unfamiliar with it? Is that what you mean by "attack"? He is a neophyte when it comes to fruit? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 11 '16 at 9:40
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    @Færd. Thanks. OP's English is quite idiomatic then, in that regard. An English speaker watching someone tear into a piece of fruit as if it were the most delicious food he had ever eaten, might say that he ate it "as though he'd never seen fruit before". Or is this person not enjoying the fruit so much as greedily filling his pockets with it? – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 11 '16 at 9:59
  • @TRomano That's about the literal translation of the term OP's asking about: ندید پدید(someone who) hasn't seen (something). The fact that it also works idiomatically makes it a good answer too. – Færd Jul 11 '16 at 10:06
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Although I think you did not provide a very suitable example, I answer this question as a learner. As I explained in the comment, in Persian, we use "ندید بدید" or "تازه به دوران رسیده" to describe a person who recently became someone important or rich but, he behaves very pretentiously such a way that one might think he was rich or important for many years. For example, a beggar who finds a million dollars on the street by chance and next day, he starts to sneer at the indigent.

I recommend you to provide more detailed and specific context so that the native can answer the question perfectly. With this regard, In order to provide some insights to your question, I can suggest:

parvenu:[noun] a person from usually a low social position who has recently or suddenly become wealthy, powerful, or successful but who is not accepted by other wealthy, powerful, and successful people

nouveau riche:[noun] a person who has recently become rich and who likes to spend a lot of money

upstart:[noun] a person who has recently begun an activity, become successful, etc., and who does not show proper respect for older and more experienced people

4

In many languages, there is either a word or a phrase to describe this adjective.

Below translation is what you are looking for, which is the best usage of the definition I can find.

nouveau-riche: A pejorative term for one who has recently become rich and who spends money conspicuously. From French, meaning "new rich."

However, if you are looking for an English slang to use in an urban way, there is this one:

chinless wonder:

It is usually used for a specific human profile who is rich, egocentric and simply idiot (other people see this person as so).

  • I think the OP is describing a nouveau riche person who is also "pulling up the ladder" (i.e, they look down on poor people). – mklingen Apr 6 '18 at 19:31
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What about arriviste? "One that is a new and uncertain arrival (as in social position or artistic endeavor)"

You can see examples following the link. This one may fit your request

The town's old money immediately shunned these vulgar arrivistes, who may have had the cash but certainly not the class

As you can see it may imply negative connotations.

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