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Text:

Roger wants to write a book about some of the interesting investigations from his company’s past. He thinks that one or two of the investigations would be good material for a novel or even for a suspense movie.

According to the text, #1 is correct, is #2 also correct?

  1. What does Roger think that his company’s past investigations can provide? He thinks they can provide good material for a novel or even a suspense movie.
  2. What does Roger think about a couple of investigations from his company’s past? He thinks they are good material for a novel or even a suspense movie.

Are they very wide-open questions?

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  • Wide-open questions? As opposed to what?
    – Lambie
    Sep 22, 2020 at 19:33

1 Answer 1

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He thinks that one or two of the investigations would be good material for a novel or even for a suspense movie.

IMO, the reason for #1 being correct is mentioned with a brief touch in the main example. The example explains "one or two", being in the scope of "some." It doesn't mention the exact number of scenarios, it's unclear. That's why it's more accurate than the #2.

In the case of #2, it directly mentions "a couple of" investigations for the matter, which is not completely true based on the actual example.

If I were to choose one answer for your question, I'd go for #1.

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