3

I have a sentence and am trying to convert it into a question form.

The sentence goes like this:

Barack Hussein Obama is the 44th President of the United States.

Can anybody please convert it into a question form?

4

I'd suggest you read the answer to this question on the BBC website. It describes how to form several different types of questions from statements, but I'll quote the part that's relevant in this case:

When be is the main verb, there is a similar subject-verb inversion:

She was happy when she was living in London. ~ Was she really happy, or did she just pretend?

Notice that the auxiliary verb comes before the subject in the question.

So in your case:

Barack Hussein Obama is the 44th President of the United States

becomes

Is Barack Hussein Obama the 44th President of the United States?

I'd strongly encourage you to read to entirety of the above link though, particularly "questions through intonation" to understand how this rule can sometimes be changed in spoken English.

There's further discussion of subject-auxiliary inversion on Wikipedia, including more examples.

| improve this answer | |
1

In English interrogative contructions the normal subject-verb order is inverted and the subject follows the auxliary or modal verb.

Thus, the interrogative form of "Barack Hussein Obama is the 44th President of the United States" is "Is Barack Hussein Obama the 44th President of the United States?"

| improve this answer | |
  • 1
    What Carlo says here is correct. If your sentence appears too big for you, you can consider a smaller sentence first, like, He is a boy. Can you convert this into interrogative? – aarbee Sep 1 '13 at 9:06

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.