2

Please take a look at the sentence below:

You know how we have those clients visiting at work next week?

I learned 'have somebody v-ing' sometimes means that 'to get someone to do something'.

For example> I had Tom visiting your place to get your stuff back. (Please check if the sentence okay as well.)

I think in this case the sentence means :

You know how we are going to serve the clients who are visiting next week?

Is my idea right?

3

I don't think the meaing of the sentence is as you put it in the last block quote.

You know how we are going to serve the clients who are visiting next week?

I think it is a way of expressing a situation that is about to happen in a certain moment (for that specific context).

Person A is stating to Person B that there will be some clients visiting at work next week. They might perform some work related actions but they are out of context right now.

For example:

Person A: "You know how we had those meteors crashing down in Russia last year?

Person B: "Yeah, I know. How about them?"

Person A: "Turns out they have high density of metal in them."

In my example, Person A is talking about an event that happened in the past.

  • Thank you for your answer. But I still wonder why the speaker say 'how' in the sentence. Here is more context A: Get this. You know how we have those clients visiting at work next week? B: Uh-huh. A: Well, my boss and I were supposed to take them out to dinner on Wednesday night. But this morning, she walks into my office and tells me she can’t make it after all. – Elaung Jul 18 '16 at 14:13
  • Can I also say without 'how'? ... like.. 'You know we have those clients visiting at work next week? – Elaung Jul 18 '16 at 14:16
  • Yes. In this context, it does not change the meaning. – apollo Jul 18 '16 at 16:05
2

Yes, I think your understanding is correct.

The nature of the obligation with have varies, but it remains obligation nonetheless. It can be the obligation to obey a command or follow an instruction, or the more tenuous obligation of something that has been arranged or planned for the near future.

I had him wash the car, since it was he who had driven it on a muddy road.

He who drove the car through the mud must wash the car. He has been told to do so.

We have guests coming next week.

They will come. It has been arranged. This visit is in our future.

He can't meet us for lunch. He says he has to go to the dentist.

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