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I find "think bright" is much more common usage, but why? In my opinion, "Think" is a verb, so it is reasonable to use adverb to describe it.

Examples:

THINK BRIGHT!

The National University of Science and Technology MISIS

(Source: MISIS)

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    I've never encountered "Think Bright" in normal speech or written text. Where do you see it? There is a campaign and associated slogan, but we don't always expect good English in such things.
    – djna
    Jul 20 '16 at 17:32
  • How about some examples where you found this used.
    – user3169
    Jul 20 '16 at 18:09
  • @djna I admit it is just a mistake, but there is some examples: 1) google - imgur.com/a/2L4tA 2) University brochure misis.ru/files/-/acfd14286d02bc9f2e16fc0474778926/…
    – aryndin
    Jul 20 '16 at 20:08
  • @djna suppose slogan (I didn't specify i'm talking about normal speech), is think brightly more correct in this case?
    – aryndin
    Jul 20 '16 at 20:11
  • Thanks for adding more detail - I've retracted my close vote.
    – ColleenV
    Jul 20 '16 at 20:32
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In think bright, bright is used as an adverb. This is similar to think different. Such adverbs--whether standard or not--are called flat adverbs, because they lack the -ly ending associated with most adverbs. For example, in I had to think hard about this sentence, hard is a flat adverb.

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  • So, why do we use flat adverbs? Do we just want talk faster and less formal or bright has other meaning compared to brightly (and similarly with other flat and non-flat adverbs)?
    – aryndin
    Jul 20 '16 at 20:21
  • Well @jumpjet67 the two adverbs hard and hardly have different meanings as normally used. I suggest the Daily Writing Tips's Flat Adverbs Are Flat-Out Useful. Jul 21 '16 at 5:27
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Some shine bright, but never seem to hang around for long.

It was unnerving how bright they shone and so I tried to look away.

The sun is shining bright in the sky and nobody else is around.

According to OxforddIctionaries.com bright can be a noun, an adjective and an adverb, which has a literary meaning brightly (see the examples).

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