8

We say: "I got used to it" when we know that something has always happened the same way and I'm agree with that. That's correct, right?

If there's a situation where you've gotten used to something from a while, but things have changed and now you regret letting it happen. Or you just feel sad because of it.

For example:

Since I was young, my mother always washed and ironed my shirts. Now, I'm far from home, I don't know how to do it and I'm having problems because of it. I __________.

Other:

For a few years, Jane always drove me to work. She resigned last week and has a different job. Now, I have to go alone and I can't get used to it. I ___________.

In Spanish we say: "Yo me mal acostumbré". A literal (and I'm sure, wrong) translation would be "I bad get used to it".

What is the right way to say it please?

  • 1
    A very interesting question! I'm not sure we have a way to say it so precisely in English. The first thing I can think of is "I had gotten used to that." It doesn't necessarily mean anything bad, but I feel like we use it when we felt OK about something, but now it has changed. – stangdon Jul 20 '16 at 19:46
  • May be "I am nostalgic for it" ? – user13267 Jul 21 '16 at 5:39
  • 1
    @user13267 I feel like this would be antinostalgia; he is stating that, in retrospect (or in hindsight), the character looks back and is discontented with the accumulation of the past. I feel that nostalgia induces a more soothing comfort with a look into the past. – kando Jul 21 '16 at 11:52
5

Yo me mal acostumbré

It sounds like you are trying to express regret (and you mentioned this in the post) from getting used to the activity.

So I would say

  1. I regret getting used to (Jane driving me to work.)/(my mom doing my laundry.)

It's a little unwieldy but I would honestly say this. (I have probably said this in the past).

I think two alternatives would be something like

  1. I got too used to (Jane driving me to work.)/(my mom doing my laundry.)
  2. I got too comfortable having (Jane drive me to work.)/(my mom do my laundry.)

I believe these to imply regret.

We can also use should to imply regret.

  1. I should have (learned to drive (myself)/(alone) to work.)/(learned to do my own laundry.)
  2. I should have gotten used to (driving (myself)/(alone) to work.)/(doing my own laundry.)

You could also simply say

  1. I shouldn't have gotten used to it.

Where it refers to Jane driving you, or mom doing the laundry.

  • 1
    Also, "I have grown too accustomed to it (and now it's hard to live without it)." – ColleenV Jul 20 '16 at 20:27
  • That comment should be an answer by itself. It's different to the other answers and it's interesting too. – Mario S Jul 20 '16 at 20:28
  • @MarioS It's not that different from #2 - "I got too used to..." – ColleenV Jul 20 '16 at 20:31
  • Am I the only one for which the word miss immediately springs to mind? – Giambattista Jul 20 '16 at 21:14
  • 3
    "Sadly" seems unavoidably necessary to express this thought concisely in English. If I were tasked with translating Yo me mal acostumbré, I would have to write: "Sadly, I grew (inured)(accustomed)(used) to it." – P. E. Dant Jul 20 '16 at 21:32
12
  1. I took it for granted.
  2. I grew accustomed to it. (thanks ColleenV)

I think 1. is the best translation: it implies regret; see definition 2 in the Wikitionary entry. Grow accustomed to also implies regret, if the thing you were accustomed to was positive.

Edit 1: Assignment of Blame

To me each expression means something similar, but they vary in how much you are blaming yourself.

  • I miss it is very neutral. You might even use this when someone else is to blame, but it's not implied.
  • I grew accustomed to it means I enjoyed it while it lasted. It's quite neutral, with only a little regret/self blame.
  • I took it for granted means I regret that it ended. There is regret here, and in some contexts it implies that you blame yourself.
  • I shouldn't have gotten used to it means I regret getting used to it. This is definitely blaming yourself for the way you feel now.

I took it for granted works best in your example sentences. I shouldn't have gotten used to it may be a closer translation of Yo me mal acostumbré, but I'm not sure because I don't speak Spanish.

To take for granted is quite commonly used. You can use it to make an accusation and assign blame to someone else: You took it for granted. You can also use it to give a warning: You shouldn't take her for granted.

  • Quick question: do you think "I took it for granted" is a better translation than "I shouldn't have gotten used to it"? Why? (just in case, I'm not criticizing you. I'm asking as a learner) – Mario S Jul 21 '16 at 22:46
  • @MarioS good question. I've added more details about how the phrases differ; see Edit 1. – z0r Jul 22 '16 at 1:04
  • Awesome. So, "I shouldn't have gotten used to it" was I was looking for, because that's the feeling: I'm blaming myself for let it happen. I appreciate your explanation. – Mario S Jul 22 '16 at 7:48
8

In your examples, you can say "I miss it" or "I miss her doing that" or "I miss her doing that for me".

Saying "I miss ..." means that you feel sad because it has changed. It does not mean that you were responsible for having let it happen.

If you want to emphasize the meaning that you should not have become used to it, then use one of the examples from Max.

7

I believe that in this context the term that best matches the Spanish example is "I was spoiled" or "she spoiled me", indicating that I missed out on something by my life being made too easy or comfortable.

Definition:

to impair, damage, or harm the character or nature of (someone) by unwise treatment, excessive indulgence, etc.: to spoil a child by pampering him.

Perhaps even closer to your meaning: "I let her spoil me" because in "Yo me mal acostumbré" the speaker is taking responsibility for his/her previous overindulgance.

  • You should expand this. Brilliant! – P. E. Dant Jul 21 '16 at 2:09
3

Hablo español, y esa frase no existe en ingles

There are two words that can be used here: miss if you long for something you no longer have, or wish if you wish that something never happened.

Using your 1st example: Since I was young, my mother always washed and ironed my shirts. Now, I'm far from home, I don't know how to do it and I'm having problems because of that it. I wish I hadn't let her do my laundry so that, now that I'm on my own,I'd know how to do it myself.

As for the rest of your post there are many errors, which is nothing to be ashamed of. Despite these minor errors, your overall meaning is clear, so you're doing well with your English studies! I will correct the errors in your post below using strikethroughs and italics to highlight them:

Let me explain, please. In English, we can say: "I got used to it" when I we [make sure not to switch between singular and plural subjects in the same sentence] know that something has always happened in the same way. And that's correct I'm ok with that, right?

If there's a situation when where you've gotten [In American English use gotten here; in British English use got] used to something from a while, and but things have changed someday and now you have regret letting it happen. Or you just feel sad because of that it.

For example:

Since I was young, my mother always washed and ironed my shirts. Now, I'm far from home, I don't know how to do it, and I'm having problems because of that it. I wish I hadn't let her do my laundry so that, now that I'm on my own,I'd know how to do it myself.

Since For a few years, Jane always drive drove me to the job work. Well, She resigned last week and has a different job. Now I have to go alone to my job and I can't get used to that it. I miss having her to drive me to work

In Spanish we say: "Yo me mal acostumbré". A literal translation will would be "I have badly *got(ten) used to it". I'm pretty sure it's a very bad translation :-P :-)

Please, What is the right way to say it please?

I used as much of your own phrasing as possible. If you have any questions, please ask.

  • 1
    +1 because "I miss it" is an excellent way to express "I regret no longer having something to which I was accustomed." -1 because some of your other proposed corrections seem to miss the mark. OP's "I'm ok with that" probably means "I am content with being accustomed", not "I have provided an example of correct usage". OP's "bad" is not a typo for "had". The word "mal" translates as "bad" or "evil". A somewhat better translation of the Spanish sentence might be "I accustomed myself poorly" or even "I got used to the wrong thing". – Gary Botnovcan Jul 20 '16 at 21:55
  • @Giambattista Hi! Thank you for your corrections. I really appreciate it :-) About 'miss', so far I understand, is when something was with you in the past and now it's gone, but you want it back, right? In my question, I think that it could apply for the example about Jane. I miss her, so I miss to go together to work. But, for the example about the mother, the idea is you don't miss that. Instead, you had wanted do the things different, so you wouldn't have to have regrets now. So, if you had done your laundry when you were young, now, you are able to do it yourself. – Mario S Jul 20 '16 at 22:00
  • @GaryBotnovcan Thanks for your comment. Unfortunately it's often difficult to determine the original intent of the OP without having the luxury of discussing it with them (I teach ESL, and that's based on my experience). We're technically not supposed to proofread here, but I had the time and didn't mind. I disagree with you on the I'm OK with that, right? since it's clearly a question. As for the bad/had comment you've made, I can't find it. – Giambattista Jul 20 '16 at 22:16
  • @MarioS To miss something doesn't necessarily mean that you want something back. Now that you've clarified your question, the word would be wish, as in, I wish my mother hadn't always done my laundry for me, because now that I'm on my own, I don't know how to do it myself. Sound better? If so I'll edit my answer. – Giambattista Jul 20 '16 at 22:21
  • You're welcome. The bad/had swap is near the end of the post. OP's original: In Spanish we say "Yo me mal acostumbré." A literal translation would be "I bad get used to it". That emphasis is OP's, not mine. Your proposed correction either replaces "bad" with "had" or it drops "bad" entirely. – Gary Botnovcan Jul 20 '16 at 22:24
2

Since I was young, my mother always washed and ironed my shirts. Now, I'm far from home, I don't know how to do it and I'm having problems because of that. I have to get used to doing my laundry.

and

Since a few years ago, Jane always drove me to the job. Well, she resigned the last week and has a different job. Now, I have to go alone to my job and I can't get used to that. I have to get used to getting to work by myself.

There is no implication of bad in the past activities, but they are now unavailable or unacceptable. Sometimes we say you were "taking advantage of a good situation".

2

There is a fine old English verb which is a very good fit here:

I am inured to it.

The Dictionary.com entry has:

  1. to accustom to hardship, difficulty, pain, etc.; toughen or harden; habituate (usually followed by to):

In English this has almost, but not exactly, the sense of the Spanish Yo me mal acostumbré.

  • inured isn't quite right here. He's talking about situations in which one has become accustomed to something and a recent change has made them have regret. I don't think the question is about becoming accustomed to hardship. And inured is a rarely used verb; that's not the best choice for a learner. – Giambattista Jul 20 '16 at 21:13
  • I agree that it isn't perfect, but it is halfway there. I added some equivocation. I think we underestimate the learners if we assume that they won't benefit from learning words which aren't used commonly, especially when they express something as specific as "to inure" does. On the contrary, it can pique their interest and inspire them to investigate and study. – P. E. Dant Jul 20 '16 at 21:25
  • 1
    Fair enough, but honestly I was 20 years old before I ever even heard the word inured. Perhaps it's just not popular in the Mid-Atlantic US? BTW, my comment about uncommon word and learners wasn't meant to say that they aren't capable of learning these words; rather, I meant that beginners may miss the suubtle nuances of such words. – Giambattista Jul 20 '16 at 21:48
  • 1
    @Giambattista I don't disagree with you that it's a less common word, but personal familiarity isn't a great yardstick. Inure isn't that obscure; it's not an 'affuage' or 'noscible'. I don't see a problem with introducing someone to an uncommon word, if we explain that it is less common and how it might be more precise in some situations than a more common word. I do think the answer would be better with a little more description of how inure is used and why it's "almost but not exactly" the same sense. – ColleenV Jul 21 '16 at 11:09
1

Solastalgia is a neologism that describes a form of psychic or existential distress caused by environmental change

This happens to me in World of Warcraft, when I get used to the way the game is, and then Blizzard changes things around with a new expansion. I didn't go anywhere, but the changes around me are often stressful.

1

I believe, based on the context which you provided,
that the phrase for which you are looking is "take for granted".

Google "define take for granted":
The first definition provided is:

Fail to properly appreciate (someone or something),
especially as a result of overfamiliarity.

Your examples:

  • Since I was young, my mother always washed and ironed my shirts.
    Now, I'm far from home, I don't know how to do it
    and I'm having problems because of it.
    I took my mom for granted.

  • For a few years, Jane always drove me to work.
    She resigned last week and has a different job.
    Now, I have to go alone and I can't get used to it.
    I took Jane for granted.

Your phrase:

Yo me mal acostumbré probably equates more fluidly to
I had become poorly accustomed in English than
I bad get used to it.

Spoiled:

Spoiled, which appears in several answers, seems extreme.
Spoiled is sometimes used "tongue in cheek" or used with hyperbole,
but that informal usage and is likely beyond the scope of your question.

Someone who has become spoiled would likely fail to appreciate
what was gone after it was gone. The realization that something was taken for granted
would be a step in the direction of becoming unspoiled.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.