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As in this sentence -

We share in the anger and frustration of our supporters and would like to assure them that we are working to conclude the matter in the best interests of Sunderland AFC.

That was an official statement, but shouldn't there be a comma before the and? Then working would be the verb and we the subject?

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  • you add the comma if the part after the and is a independent clause (A full sentence on its own). "We X and Y" vs. We X, and we Y" – Slepz Jul 20 '16 at 22:47
  • pretty sure it's optional though – Slepz Jul 20 '16 at 22:50
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    A comma is certainly possible there, but I don't see it as required. I have no idea why the presence or absence of a comma has any relevance to whether "we" is a subject (yes, both times) or whether "working" is a verb (no, it is part of the verbal expression "are working"). – Colin Fine Jul 20 '16 at 23:33
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    I can read the sentence out with or without a break after supporters, and so I assert that it a comma is optional. I have no interest in the arbitrary rules somebody may have invented for when the must or must not be a comma. And I said that "working" was not a verb (though it is a part of verb) but the it is part of the verbal expression "is working". I have no objection if you call "is working" a verb, but I usually understand "verb" to mean a single word. – Colin Fine Jul 21 '16 at 23:14
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    Like @Colin, I can read the sentence out with or without a break after 'supporters'; I see no confusion generated in either case, and see no adjustment in meaning, and hence agree that a comma is optional. Though one might well aid the speaker's breathing. And again, I have no interest in the arbitrary rules somebody may have invented for when there must or must not be a comma. They probably made/make a lot of sense with most/many examples, but slavish adherence to them is misunderstanding how English works and changes. – Edwin Ashworth Jul 21 '16 at 23:37
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When "and" links two words or phrases, a comma is not necessary. In this sentence, "and" is linking only the two phrases "we share" and "(we) would like to assure," so a comma is not necessary. The phrase "that we are working" is the beginning of a dependent clause.

If it helps, the structure of the sentence is like this:

  • We share in the anger and frustration of our supporters.
  • We would like to assure them.
    • We are working to conclude the matter.

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