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  1. She asked me to give her a call when I was near her college.

  2. She asked me to give her a call when I was a few minutes from her college.

  3. She asked me to give her a call when I neared her college.

Are all three of the above sentences grammatically correct? Do they mean the same thing?

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    Is there something about these sentences that you don't understand? – P. E. Dant Jul 25 '16 at 8:01
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Yes, all three mean the same things essentially, and yes, they are all grammatically correct. I put mean in italics because they don't literally mean the same thing.

The first sentence introduces a condition of position.

The second sentence introduces a condition of time.

The third sentence introduces a condition of action.

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In the first sentence, she wants to make a quick getaway before you arrive.

In the second, she wants to make a quick getaway before you arrive.

In the third, she wants to make a quick getaway before you arrive.

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