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1- Once you reach the top, perhaps no one seeing you, you’ll be able to see top of the world. Occasionally, life means hardworking for a dream not seen by anyone other than you.

Or

2-Once you reach the top, perhaps no one sees you, you’ll be able to see top of the world. Occasionally, life means hardworking for a dream not seen by anyone other than you.

P.S. Suppose that italic one is adverbial phrase. I consider the first one to be correct because of Absolute clause being used there. But I am not sure about its relevance.

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    The construction you have chosen is very awkward in English. I suggest: "Once you reach the top, perhaps seen by no-one,..." – P. E. Dant Reinstate Monica Jul 27 '16 at 9:40
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    This is a clause that cries out for the use of the passive voice, for example perhaps unseen by anyone – JavaLatte Jul 27 '16 at 10:44
  • Does the phrase "perhaps unseen by anyone" or " perhaps seen by no-one" refers "you" or "the top" in your sentence? – Anfi Jul 27 '16 at 12:00
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I don't think either really work. You are adding a qualifying idea into the "reach the top ... you'll be able to see", but as currently expressed it's ambiguous. Do you mean that once you are at the top you may not be seen, or do you mean that no one sees you in the process of making it to the top.

Either expression could have either meaning but

no one seeing you

has more of the flavour of seeing the process of getting to the top

no one sees you

has more of the flavour of being seen once at the top.

I would want to phrase this in a way that makes the intent clear

Once you reach the top, even though now maybe no one can see you, you’ll be able to see top of the world. Occasionally, life means hardworking for a dream not seen by anyone other than you.

explicitly saying what the observer can (or rather cannot) see

Once you reach the top, even though no one saw your climb, you’ll be able to see top of the world. Occasionally, life means hardworking for a dream not seen by anyone other than you.

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