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This question is an exact duplicate of:

In Shane Koyzcan’s poem “Instructions for a Bad Day,” the author expresses an optimistic attitude towards life where he encourages us to forget the burden of the past, to live in the present with hope, to carry on our lives with courage, and to learn to express our lives.

Is where used properly in this sentence?

Do you find anything in this sentence awkward?

marked as duplicate by Alan Carmack, Nathan Tuggy, Glorfindel, Em., JavaLatte Jul 28 '16 at 9:39

This question was marked as an exact duplicate of an existing question.

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    I rolled this question back. Please do not add an additional question to an existig post, unless it serves to help understand the original question. Use a separate post to ask an additional question, please. – Alan Carmack Jul 28 '16 at 8:47
  • Not now that you have edited the question by deleting the second part of it. – Rompey Jul 28 '16 at 9:15
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It is used correctly, the sentence isn't awkward although it is very long. Where in this case is used to demonstrate/explain in more detail how the author expresses an optimistic attitude.

In Shane Koyzcan’s poem “Instructions for a Bad Day,” the author expresses an optimistic attitude towards life where he encourages us to forget the burden of the past

can be written as:

In Shane Koyzcan’s poem “Instructions for a Bad Day,” the author expresses an optimistic attitude towards life. He does this by encouraging us to forget the burden of the past

A shorter example would be:

The man talked about different cats, where he discussed their colour and size.

He talks about different cats, and in more detail, he discusses their colour and size.

To answer your other question:

I understand the author‘s worry, confusion, and question about the purpose of life, to which I have the same feeling.

You have used to which correctly. However I would suggest making question plural (questions) because it is not a specific single question, but an attitude that encompasses a range of questions. I would also change feeling to feelings for the same reason, that the author has many feelings about the situation, rather than one specific feeling.

  • What about this sentence? Is "which" used correctly here? and is this sentence awkward? I understand the author‘s worry, confusion, and question about the purpose of life, to which I have the same feeling. thank you very much – Sonni Jul 27 '16 at 20:05
  • I've edited my answer to address your other question – SLC Jul 28 '16 at 8:18
  • @Sonni The final paragraph seems to be a tad misleading - "to" is an incorrect preposition here - if it matters at all once the question was edited. – Rompey Jul 28 '16 at 9:33

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