0

am currently writing a document that describes a person's behavior. And in one of my paragraphs, I have this three girls laughing so hard at a rooftop and a person from below might've mistaken their laugh for a wild animal. So I've written the description in this way: One might mistaken them for a wild animal. I just wanna know if my use of the word mistaken is correct on this one?

I'm just trying to describe that to a passerby below the laughing of the three girls from the rooftop could be mistaken for a wild animal's cry. Am so not good in explaining things especially on writing. Any suggestion to improve my statement would be so appreciated. Thanks for your help.

  • 2
    The first thing is that it should be one might have mistaken ... – Alejandro Jul 11 '16 at 4:21
  • 1
    I see. So, should it be like this: "One might have mistaken their laugh for a wild animal's cry"? – Archangel08 Jul 11 '16 at 4:28
  • Questions which lack results of research are out of scope. Writing advice requests are out of scope. Proofreading requests are out of scope. For an introduction to the site, take the Tour. For help writing a good question, see How to Ask. – MetaEd Jul 26 '16 at 17:24
0

The word mistaken and your usage are correct, however the tense is a little muddled.

It should be:

One might mistake them for a wild animal.

This means that if they were to listen, they might think it's a wild animal.

Or

One might have mistaken them for a wild animal.

This means that if they were to listen, they might think it's a wild animal before they realised it's not a wild animal.

The reason is might have mistaken suggested that they were mistaken but they are not any more.

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.