0

Is it ok to omit "which is" from "which is why", and simply use "why" to start a subordinate clause?

E.g. "My television was broken, why I spent the evening reading a book."

"So" might be better to use, but my question is if it is correct to use "why" on its own in this case.

1

1 Answer 1

1

No, you can't just simply leave out the "which is" from the "which is why", because these two have different meanings. "Which is why" = something happened, because..., as a single "why" is used for questions.

The sentence

"My television was broken, why I spent the evening reading a book."

is wrong. The second half of this sentence would imply a question, i.e.:

"He asked why I spent the evening reading a book."

But as you said, you could use the "so" in this sentence and it would be correct:

"My television was broken, so I spent the evening reading a book."

You must log in to answer this question.