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Previously, I was asking help for some right words to describe a conversation that swaps between On and Off states. In the question, I wrote this,

My spoken English is not very good, my Vocabulary is weak either.

And some time later, I received some suggestion to improve my question, and the word, Either has been replaced by Too.

I came across some English web sites where the authors said that "either" is used in negative sentences. My understanding is that "weak" and "poor" are words that will make negative meaning in sentences.

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    weak and poor are seen as negative qualities, but the sentence is still an affirmative sentence. A negative sentence in the rule you reference would be one using "not" or "never", etc to negate the verb. – eques Jul 28 '16 at 11:59
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    @kitty, In order to use the negative form of either (which may be what you'd like to do) you would have to phrase your sentence like this: My spoken English is not very good, and neither is my Vocabulary. In the alternative: My spoken English is not very good, nor is my Vocabulary. A colloquial form is My spoken English is not very good, either is my Vocabulary. This is incorrect grammar, but you will hear this usage in NAmE. – P. E. Dant Jul 31 '16 at 8:16
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'either' is used when you are continuing something. The correct word here is 'too', or 'also',

However, you could say

My English isn't so good. My vocabulary isn't very good either.

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My spoken English isn't very good, my vocabulary is weak either.

The sentence isn't correct grammatically.

When you use either as an adverb at the end of a statement, the statement should be in the negative. "My vocabulary is weak" isn't a negative statement; it's an affirmative statement. You should rephrase the sentence as follows:

My spoken English isn't very good, and my vocabulary isn't either.

My vocabulary is weak, and my spoken English isn't very good either.

You can also use also or too instead of either as follows:

My spoken English isn't very good, and my vocabulary is weak too.

My spoken English isn't very good, and my vocabulary is also weak. My spoken English isn't very good. Also, my vocabulary is weak.

You can also use "also" at end position, but it's not common.

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    Just to add a couple more example sentences: The food was terrible, and the service wasn't satisfactory either. The food was terrible, and the service was horrible too. I've never really paid attention to how this works, and I find it rather interesting, too. – J.R. Jul 28 '16 at 21:25

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