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I'm writing a technical report about a software.

This is my sentence

The instances of rs:Rating class, of its sub classes, illustrated in section 3, and of the Likes class, illustrated in section 4, with their predicates are defined during the Configuration process and they answer the competency question number 10.

The words class and instance are software engineering terminologies.

I'm not sure if of is correct in that sentence. What I'm trying to say is: the instances of rs:Rating class, the instances of its sub classes, and the instances of the Likes class are together being defined during the configuration process. the its in that sentence is referred to the rs:Rating class.

Could you help please?

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Your sentence as written is clear and grammatically correct. However, removing the second use of the preposition of results in a sentence which is easier to understand:

The instances of rs:Rating class and its sub classes, illustrated in section 3, and of the Likes class, illustrated in section 4, with their predicates are defined during the Configuration process and they answer the competency question number 10.

It is unclear from the context whether "their predicates" refers to both classes. The sentence as written implies that it refers to both.


Software is an uncountable noun and never takes the indefinite article a. See this link.

  • Thanks. in their predicates, the their refers to the instances of the rs:Ratings, its sub classes and the Likes class. – William Kinaan Jul 28 '16 at 22:33
  • @WilliamKinaan Be sure to follow the link at the end! "A software" is always wrong in English when "software" is used as an uncountable noun, for the same reason that we would not say "a money" or "a milk." – P. E. Dant Jul 28 '16 at 22:41

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