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Source: IMDB plot summary of The Untouchables (1987) Caution: spoilers.

This is the sentence my question related to:

Nitti, is tried and convicted for the murder but set free anyway.

Before this sentence, it describes Ness takes Nitti outside with baliff, & shooting took place.

He takes Nitti out of the courtroom with the bailiff and discovers that Nitti has permission from the corrupt mayor of Chicago to carry the weapon..... two exchanging gunfire through the building.

but this above sentence is telling is tried & convicted for the murder but set free anyway. does this sentence takes place after Ness takes nitti outside or before taking outside. totally confusing for me.

What is the exact location does this sentence took place ?

  • Sometimes a convicted criminal is sent straight from the courtroom to prison; sometimes the criminal is released and is expected to turn himself in a later time. To be "set free" might imply the latter. It is a layman's term, not a legal one. – Tᴚoɯɐuo Jul 30 '16 at 12:34
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You did not include enough context.

(Poorly written plot summary of The Untouchables.) Warning: SPOILERS

Payne testifies in court against Capone, admitting his role in channeling money to Capone over the last three years. Ness, however, notices Capone relaxed and even smiling, despite the probability of serving a long prison sentence, and also sees Nitti carrying a gun in court. He takes Nitti out of the courtroom with the bailiff and discovers that Nitti has permission from the corrupt mayor of Chicago to carry the weapon. Ness then identifies Nitti as Malone's murderer after finding Malone's address on a matchbook in Nitti's pocket.

Panicking, Nitti shoots the bailiff and runs up to the roof, the two exchanging gunfire through the building. Eventually, Ness gets Nitti in his sights, but cannot bring himself to shoot the man in cold blood. Nitti gives himself up to Ness, Ness telling him that he'll see him burn because he murdered Malone. Stating that Malone died "screaming like a stuck Irish pig" and that Ness should think about that when he, Nitti, is tried and convicted for the murder but set free anyway. Enraged at the thought that Nitti will escape punishment for his crimes, and provoked to revenge, Ness pushes Nitti off the roof. He shouts to the screaming thug, "Did he sound anything like that?" before Nitti dies on impact with a parked car.

The bolded portions are what you included in your answer. But critical information is in the stuff you left out. Especially NITTI GIVES HIMSELF TO NESS. Here, gives himself means surrenders himself. Perhaps a better phrase would be gives himself up to. I think I've said before these IMDB summaries do not contain the clearest or best writing. The implication, then, is that after that, Nitti is brought into court and tried. Where else is anyone "tried and convicted"?

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Nitti being tried and convicted for the murder happened after he was taken out of the courtroom.

He was taken out of the courtroom by Ness and the bailiff because Ness had seen him carrying a gun inside the courtroom.

Nitti then shot the bailiff, Ness then gave chase to Nitti, who gave himself up. Nitti was then put on trial, convicted but released.

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The cited text is:

Panicking, Nitti shoots the bailiff and runs up to the roof, the two exchanging gunfire through the building. Eventually, Ness gets Nitti in his sights, but cannot bring himself to shoot the man in cold blood. Nitti gives himself up to Ness, Ness telling him that he'll see him burn because he murdered Malone. Stating that Malone died "screaming like a stuck Irish pig" and that Ness should think about that when he, Nitti, is tried and convicted for the murder but set free anyway.

The action described takes place on the roof.

In your study of English, you should know that reviews like this one at IMDB, and at similar websites, are written by enthusiasts in the website's specialty: film, cuisine, interior decorating, etc. Anyone at all can write and publish them. You could publish one yourself! As a result, you will often encounter usage which is peculiar, puzzling, or just plain bad English, like the last sentence above, which is not a complete sentence in English. Read them for fun, and to acquaint yourself with idioms, but be wary of basing your own usage upon what you find there.

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