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I want to ask something very politely by email and I'm not sure it sounds okay.. this is what I wrote:

May I know exactly on what day the result will be announced, by any chance? I have personal circumstances to need the result by <--date-->, so it would be very helpful if you let me know more specific date. Thank you.

I wonder if "May I know ~ " and "I have personal circumstances to ~" are grammatically correct and sound natural in English.

If not, is there a better way to say this politely?

closed as off-topic by ColleenV, user3169, Glorfindel, Em., Brian Tompsett - 汤莱恩 Jul 29 '16 at 19:52

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"May I know" works. However, "exactly on what day" is slightly less natural sounding. Also, "circumstances to..." is definitely not natural. The following is how I would phrase the sentences:

May I know the exact date that the result will be announced, by any chance? Due to personal circumstances, I need the result by <--date-->. It would be very helpful if you could give me a more specific date.

If you want to stay as true as possible to the original wording, the following would be acceptable:

... I have personal circumstances requiring the result by <--date-->...

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