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I have a problem when I write this sentence:

"However, considering the fact many language courses failed their students, we feel motivated to research further."

I want to add examples to make this sentence clearer but these examples are quite long. Like:

  1. English was the worst performed subject in the recent exam.

  2. Many students remember nothing after an eight-week course.

How should I insert these 2 examples? (like "....failed their students, [example 1] [example 2], we feel motivated to....")

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  • I couldn't understand what exactly you want to say by organising these sentences.Moreover, in the first sentence, what do you mean by "many language courses failed their students" ? Does the courses failed the students or the students failed in the courses ?
    – Our
    Aug 2 '16 at 18:15
  • @Leth I mean "Many courses let their students down because they spent hours learning but didn't gain much."
    – Lans Tran
    Aug 3 '16 at 3:08
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Avoid using "however" at the beginning of a sentence.

The question is not clear. You ask about "this sentence" and you ask about adding examples. The examples are lengthy, so I suggest making them a list just as you do here.

One possible version of the sentence is:

Since many language courses have failed their students, we feel motivated to do further research of issues such as the following:

Followed by the list. That version assumes that "many language courses have failed their students" has been previously explained. Since I don't know the context I am not sure how the word "however" is appropriate.

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I would avoid phrases like “the fact that”. They only add unneeded words. You are right to seek compact expression. Don’t be afraid to write multiple short sentences. For example:

English was the worst performed subject in the recent exam and many students remember nothing after an eight-week course. These, [and other] failures motivate us to further research.

One way to get the thought into a single sentence is to squeeze the examples into noun phrases:

Low exam scores and the students’ poor knowledge retention rates motivate us to further research.

I agree with Leth's comment. You will be more persuasive if you lay out the facts, and then make the case that your research will determine the cause.

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  • Can't it be like:- ....failures motivate us for further research.? Jul 15 '18 at 2:29

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