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I'm using this sentence: "The crowd acclaims for one more song".

My concerns are:

  • If "crowd" represents "they", should I be saying "acclaim" instead?
  • Does "acclaims for" makes sense? Should I be saying "The crowd acclaims one more song" instead?
  • Actually the verb "acclaim" does not make sense. acclaim has to do with praise or approval. What are you trying to say that the crowd is doing? Cheering and screaming so the band will play one more song? – user3169 Jul 31 '16 at 23:20
  • Hi @user3169, that was indeed the intention. What verb do your suggest instead? – jviotti Aug 1 '16 at 1:12
  • Hi @jviotti, you might want to check the additional answer I provided. It was based on your comment. – shin Aug 1 '16 at 5:20
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For the first point, it is a matter emphasis. Do you wish to consider the crowd as a single item (Use "The crowd is") or as collection (The crowd are). In this example, the crowd is acting as one, so treat it as singular.

As for the second question, the verb "acclaim" means to shout a welcome. You could say "The crowd calls for one more song"

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  • This makes a lot of sense, and I appreciate the suggestion. Thanks a lot! – jviotti Aug 1 '16 at 1:12
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NOTE: Since the explanation to the main questions is provided, I'd just post this answer to provide additional information.

The following sentence may also be used to describe that certain type of request for additional performance:

"The crowd requested for an 'encore'.

Encore

noun

a demand, as by applause, for a repetition of a song, act, etc., or for a performance of a number or piece additional to those on a program, or for a reappearance by the performers, as at the end of a concert, recital, etc.

the performance or reappearance in response to such a demand: He chose a Chopin nocturne for his encore.

any repeated or additional performance or appearance, as a rerun of a telecast or a rematch in sports.

verb (used with object), encored, encoring.

to call for a repetition of.

to call for an encore from (a performer).

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