2

Example:

I make 10 dollars an hour.


1. Is it correct to say:

I make 20 dollars two hours.


2. How could I ask a question so the answer would be an hour? Is it correct to say:

How often do you make 10 dollars?

  • The correct answer for your question two would be "every hour"... because "how often" implies a repeated time frame. Could you explain why you want to find a question where the answer is "an hour"? That might help us give you better answers. – Catija Aug 3 '16 at 23:30
  • I'm an English teacher. Each Reading or Conversation I teach, students are supposed to ask each other comprehension questions about the topic. In this reading one of them asked, "How often does she make $6.75?", and expected his classmate to say, an hour. But I felt there was something wrong with the question. – Mori Aug 4 '16 at 16:31
  • No, the expected answer should be "every hour", which I noted in my previous comment. The question is perfectly fine. – Catija Aug 4 '16 at 16:32
  • "The question is perfectly fine." I know. But then that's what crossed my mind: How could he ask the question so the other student would answer: an hour. – Mori Aug 4 '16 at 16:47
1

If you want a question that can be answered with "an hour" in this context, the best thing I can think of is "How long does it take you to earn ten dollars?"

3
  • wage
    money that is paid or received for work or services, as by the hour, day, or week.
    1. What's your wage?
    2. What's your hourly wage?

At least here in America, many jobs pay by the hour. So if you asked an average person 1, they might likely reply with

  1. I make 10 dollars an hour.

for example. If you really wanted to be specific, you could ask 2. I believe the response would certainly be 3.

The problem is that these two questions seem a little formal for everyday use. I feel like they are likely to appear on a government website, or a job application. I think in everyday language, I would be more likely to hear

  1. How much do you make?
  2. How much do you make an/per hour?
2
  1. I make 20 dollars every two hours.

People usually don't use two hours as a time frame, however. The norm is to speak in terms of per hour, per week, per month, and per year.

  1. How much do you make an hour?

Keep in mind that the answer would not actually end in "per hour" because the time frame is already given by the question and it would be redundant. If you wanted the answer to supply its own time frame, you would ask:

How much do you make?

  • "How much do you make?" It can't be answered with an hour. – Mori Aug 3 '16 at 14:29
  • It actually can. If you ask a native English speaker this question you can expect answers like: "10 dollars an hour" or "40k a year". – eelero Aug 3 '16 at 15:23
  • Or day. In many industries they talk about earnings per day. Also, I'm not sure that there's any reason someone wouldn't ask "How much do you make per hour?"... – Catija Aug 3 '16 at 23:27
0

The first one is wrong, but you could say:

I make 20 dollars in two hours.

Although this still isn't very good to say, because you could mean that in two hours from the time right now you make 20 dollars and not from 2 hours of work. So even better would be:

I make 20 dollars for two hours of work.

For the second one is incorrect as well, but you could ask:

How much money do you make?

Or even better:

"How much money do you make an hour?" Or "How much money do you make per hour?"

  • Neither of the suggested questions can be answered with an hour. – Mori Aug 3 '16 at 14:28
  • 2
    @Mori - If you absolutely want a question that can be answered with "an hour" in this context, the best thing I can think of is "How long does it take you to earn ten dollars?" – stangdon Aug 3 '16 at 14:57
  • @stangdon: Please post it as an answer so I can mark it as accepted. – Mori Dec 8 '16 at 16:42
  • @Mori - Done! (And more text to put this comment above the minimum required length) – stangdon Dec 8 '16 at 17:57

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