4

Please look at the sentence below

Suppose, on Friday, my uncle said, "I have sent you a dictionary, you will have received it by Monday." in which does "you will have received it by Monday." mean that the book can be delivered even on Monday and, technically, not later than midnight. Am I right? Or should it be strictly before Monday?

Also,

  1. I have sent you a dictionary, you will have received it by Monday.

  2. I have sent you a dictionary, you will receive it by Monday.

Do the two sentences convey the same meaning and the difference is just of the point of view. #1 looks at future from now and #2 looks at the past from future. Right?

Thanks.

  • 1
    As a US English speaker, I don't think I would ever say #1. #2 just sounds a lot more natural. There's no reason to say "you will have ____ed" unless you're relating it to some other event. – stangdon Aug 4 '16 at 16:48
3

"By Monday" technically means "before Monday" – that is, on or before 23:59:59.9(9) on Sunday night. However, the actual definition can be less strict. In the context of business, it may be delivered on Monday before business hours (most likely before 09:00, although it can earlier or later in some places).

There is no real difference between sentences #1 and #2 in your question, although I would expect that sentence #2:

I have sent you a dictionary, you will receive it by Monday.

Will be heard more often than sentence #1.


The sentences you have used should use a period or include a conjunction:

I have sent you a dictionary. You will receive it by Monday.
I have sent you a dictionary, and you will receive it by Monday.

The answer by Cookie Monster includes a common way of saying this, but it is different. "You will get it this Monday" means "it will arrive on Monday" and does not mean that it may arrive before Monday, or that it will arrive before Monday. A way of phrasing your sentence in a manner similar to that used by Cookie Monster, while retaining the same meaning, would be:

I have sent you a dictionary. You will get it by Monday.

You could also say:

I have sent you a dictionary. ...

It will arrive by Monday.
It will have arrived by Monday.

You will have it by Monday.
You will have got it by Monday.

It will be delivered by Monday.
It will have been delivered by Monday.

You may also be interested in this resource for the difference between the tenses:

| improve this answer | |
  • @shikhaji: Please see the first paragraph of my answer. "By Monday" means any time before Monday, but not including Monday (with one of the exceptions mentioned in the paragraph). – LMS Aug 4 '16 at 20:09
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    Wow, this is the second time on ELL that I have encountered someone saying by a time means before that time. I think this is just a different usage from the one I am used to. If I say you need to turn in your homework by Friday it means Friday at the latest, including all day Friday. 'Get it to me by Tuesday' means I want to receive it Tuesday or sooner. If someone tells me 'your package will arrive by Wednesday' I won't get upset if it does not arrive on Tuesday, because 'by Wednesday' means 'Wednesday at the latest'. – Alan Carmack Aug 4 '16 at 21:04
  • @AlanCarmack: Perhaps it's a regional/dialect difference. If I asked someone to do something "by Tuesday," I would expect it to be done/ready by the start of Tuesday (the day or business hours or whichever, depending on exact use). – LMS Aug 4 '16 at 21:13
  • @AlanCarmack: In 'I have sent you a dictionary. You will receive it by Tuesday.', the latest one can give is on Tuesday also. So here in future perfect, Is our point of view, technically, midnight of Tuesday or the end of business hours as the context may provide for. Am I right? So on Wednesday, we can say "On wednesday, you will have received it,", meaning anytime on Wednesday, I can say, I have received it. Am I right? – shikha ji Aug 5 '16 at 1:46
2

You know, you can spend years learning grammar and never get anywhere. What you really need to focus on in your English studies is how people say things. So, what you're trying to say can be rephrased using much simpler language:

I sent you a dictionary. You will get/receive it this Monday.

| improve this answer | |
  • I disagree. "You will get it this Monday" is different from "You will get it by Monday." The former means it will arrive on Monday, the latter means it will have already arrived before Monday. – LMS Aug 4 '16 at 16:36
  • Well, just change "this" to "by" and you're golden! – Michael Rybkin Aug 4 '16 at 16:37

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