Linked Questions

6
votes
2answers
3k views

The ambiguous “he is buried”

In a sentence taken from the Oxford Dictionary: ‘The inscription on his tombstone in Groombridge Church, where he is buried alongside his three children, bears his original name and no reference to ...
2
votes
2answers
11k views

Why is it v-ing after looking forward to?

I took an English grammar test and one question was: Chen's looking forward ... his new job next week. There were four choices: to starting / to start / starting / in starting. My answer was "to ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Is “running” a gerund here?

In this following sentence: The boy is running? Is the word "running" a gerund? If so, why does this make sense? Why does the sentence structurally make sense?
4
votes
1answer
608 views

Gerund & participle: “She stormed out, 'slamming' the door so hard that the mirror fell off the wall”

She stormed out, slamming the door so hard that the mirror fell off the wall. As fa as I know, in Italian language slamming functions as a gerund there, but, very often—as it could be the case ...
2
votes
1answer
3k views

“drivers” or “driver's”?

The Autopilot feature is designed to allow Teslas to cruise highways without drivers steering, braking or accelerating. Source: Mosher, Alexandra, “Tesla drivers play Jenga, sleep, using Autopilot in ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

The role of 'sleeping' in 'sleeping baby'

A "sleeping baby" generally means a baby that is sleeping at the time of speaking, as shown in this sentence: After finishing all the feeding, bathing and nappy-changing duties, a number of dads ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Verbs which are always followed by past participle

You seem unconcerned. The sauce tastes burned. In these two sentences, past participle of verbs, unconcerned and burned, have been used after two especial verbs, seem and tastes. Are they always ...
1
vote
2answers
2k views

Why do we use gerunds?

I am very impress the way he explained the perfect infinitive. I tried to contact him but found no email. Could any one kind enough to explain the gerunds as he explained perfect infinitive? Perfect ...
2
votes
1answer
1k views

“The man standing …” a gerund or an adjective?

Please tell me if "standing" is a gerund or an adjective- The man standing over there is a friend of mine.
2
votes
2answers
98 views

Dont stand close to the TV [closed]

He was standing near to the TV. (distance is short.) "Step back. Dont stand close to the TV." Does it sound natural and grammatically correct?
2
votes
3answers
121 views

Uncountable and countable

All the major dictionaries say that exercise, when denotes a physical activity, is an uncountable noun. Swimming is good exercise. (OALD) Cycling to work is good exercise. (Cambridge ...
0
votes
2answers
134 views

What is the difference in the meaning of these sentences?

I confuse sometimes. I get confused sometimes. I know that the second one is in the passive form but is there any difference in the meaning of these two sentences. Are both grammatically correct? ...
0
votes
2answers
127 views

Does “- ing “make verb noun?

When “-ing” comes after verb , does it make it noun like : A legislation contains giving some right to homeless people.
1
vote
1answer
116 views

“Trying to be happy.”

So if this stands by itself is "Trying" a gerund or a participle. So in my opinion there are two ways to go about this. It could definitely be a gerund (Trying to be happy is always good) but I want ...
1
vote
1answer
187 views

How to tell whether ing forms are gerunds or participles

So I looked up the meanings of the word "former" and the descriptions were as follows : Having previously been a particular thing. Denoting the first or first mentioned of two people or things....

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