Linked Questions

21 votes
6 answers
46k views

Why do you "get in a car" but "get on a train" [duplicate]

I was trying to work out why get in car but on most other transportation systems. Get in a car, helicopter Get on a train, plane, boat (although in feels like it works ok here) Is it the size of ...
RichK's user avatar
  • 309
6 votes
2 answers
309k views

"in the plane" or "on the plane" [duplicate]

When referring to a car, we tend to say "in the car". "I am in the car" but when it comes to plane, the sentence is either "I am on the plane" or "I am in the plane". The term "on" would ...
myselfmiqdad's user avatar
6 votes
4 answers
337k views

“In the bus” or “on the bus” [duplicate]

“in the bus” or “on the bus” I know that, when we travel by bus we say, “I am on the bus”, but how about for objects, for example There must be a cell-phone charger in the bus. Or There must be ...
Ahmbro Dude's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
79k views

Which preposition is correct "On the airplane" or "In the airplane"? [duplicate]

Which preposition I have to use when talking about "airplane" or "aircraft"? Should I use "in" like "in the car" or "on" like "on the bus? "On the airplane / aircraft" or "In the airplane / ...
Virtuous Legend's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
14k views

which one is correct- Let's go on a bus/go in a bus/ go by a bus? [duplicate]

which one is correct- Let's go on a bus/go in a bus/ go by a bus ? I am confused with these three options.
Jivu's user avatar
  • 1
1 vote
0 answers
5k views

"in my car" vs "on my car" [duplicate]

I know that the rule is to use "in" when we are talking about small vehicles, but is there an exception when we could use "on" like for example: "I am on my car to you."? (meaning that I am on my way ...
Laura's user avatar
  • 133
2 votes
1 answer
3k views

in vs. on: using transportation [duplicate]

I told my better half that she should say she's "getting on the bus" rather than "getting in the bus." She asked me why, because you would "get in the car" and not "...
Ming's user avatar
  • 121
1 vote
0 answers
43 views

"In, into, on" The Big Problem [duplicate]

I have always found prepositions to be a fishy part of grammar in English. Suppose we have a train, a bus, a car, a plane, a ship, a boat. We can either say: To get in the train (bus, car, plane, ...
SovereignSun's user avatar
  • 25.1k
1 vote
0 answers
41 views

Prepositions for transportations. In & On [duplicate]

Why "on a plane", "on a bus", but "in a car"? It's hard to explain. How to explain that to English learners? This question is not a duplicate. Please, try to understand what I ask. How to explain ...
Quidam's user avatar
  • 599
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

Preposition on Mode of Transport [duplicate]

I am studying preposition related to mode of transportation (English is not my first language). Despite knowing the rule for by, on, in prepositions, I still find them confusing. Can you tell how ...
Sabrina Texon's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
28k views

Is the sentence: "I always go to work on my car" correct?

Can we say: I always go to work on my car. or it should be rather: go to work by my car or go to work in my car Which one is the most correct?
Marta's user avatar
  • 29
2 votes
3 answers
87k views

When do we choose 'on bicycle' vs. 'by bicycle'?

Which is more appropriate or grammatical to use: He is coming on a bicycle. He is coming by bicycle.
aung's user avatar
  • 391
4 votes
3 answers
3k views

Why is "got in the car" relatively common, whereas "got in Japan" is not?

"got in the car": 50,000,000 hits "got into the car": 17,900,000 hits "got in Japan": 178,000 hits "got into Japan": 1,160,000 hits After having observed that the hit ratio of "got in the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
95 views

"Book seats on air flights" vs. "Book seats in air flights"

I rely on computers to book seats on/in air flights. The answer to the above question is given as on but I believe it should be in. Please suggest.
Seema Bhukar's user avatar
  • 1,575
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

"Transport something on a sprinter van" or "transport something with a sprinter van"?

Could you please tell me which preposition, on or with, it is more natural and correct to use in the context below? The load is not to heavy, so we could transport it on/with a sprinter van.
Dmytro O'Hope's user avatar