Linked Questions

1 vote
2 answers
109 views

I am a Chinese? [duplicate]

The most rampant and fossilized mistake I've heard from Chinese EFL speakers/learners is "a Chinese" where 'Chinese' was used as a singular noun, for instance, "I am a Chinese". I ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,481
26 votes
9 answers
10k views

Are you an English? Are you a British?

I once encountered a lady who seemed to come from America or the United Kingdom. When I asked Are you an American? she said no. I was reluctant to ask if she is an English because it sounded very ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
  • 3,481
29 votes
5 answers
8k views

How much should I trust Wiktionary?

My first reference that I use for English words is Wiktionary. I primarily do so because it's a not-for-profit project, so I don't have to worry about it suddenly charging for subscriptions, or that ...
Golden Cuy's user avatar
  • 5,937
9 votes
2 answers
4k views

Is Vietnamese a noun or an adjective?

If I say I am Vietnamese. Is Vietnamese a noun or an adjective? According to OALD, Vietnamese can be a noun or an adjective. If it’s a noun, why don’t we say I am a Vietnamese? Because its meaning is ...
Meow's user avatar
  • 1,213
8 votes
4 answers
2k views

How should I use "infer"?

A recent question on Meta discussed advantages and disadvantages of using more advanced words in ELL. As example, this answer was used: 'A Japanese' infers the Japanese person is a thing, and not a ...
SF.'s user avatar
  • 10.2k
2 votes
3 answers
3k views

What do we call a person from a certain country?

Do we call a person from China "a Chinese"? For example, can I say: I have a friend, he is a Chinese?
Nguyễn Quốc Việt's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
1k views

Is "Alien" a term normally used for foreigners?

When used in the context of foreigners, rather than extra-terrestrial beings, is "Alien" commonly used? I suspect that it's only used in legal contexts, such as government forms. But I'm not totally ...
Golden Cuy's user avatar
  • 5,937
1 vote
3 answers
5k views

Are "a native Chinese" or "a native Chinese person" normal English phrases?

A student of mine recently said "I thought I was speaking to a native Chinese." I would always say "I thought I was speaking to a native Chinese speaker" or "I thought I was speaking to someone from ...
Nick's user avatar
  • 13
1 vote
2 answers
126 views

Should you use "the" when writing uncountable nationality adjectives?

Example sentence: (The) Japanese have been doing business with (the) Chinese for a very long time. (Maybe using "the" is a bit offensive?)
alex's user avatar
  • 4,839
0 votes
4 answers
122 views

Can I use "the British" as a specific British person or persons?

A: The British person I met was very friendly. B: The British I met was very friendly. C: The British persons I met were very friendly. D: The British I met were very friendly. Are ...
magic-dragon's user avatar