Questions tagged [absolute-clauses]

An absolute phrase is a phrase that modifies the entire main clause of a sentence, instead of just an individual word.

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Absolute phrase with adjective?

So I've recently learned about absolute phrase and wondering if we can use it with adjective like: Lanterns hang from the branches, the night sky visible through the spaces between the leaves. Is ...
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Absolute phrase in the future tense, with 'having+past participle' construction

Can we use the absolute phrase in the future tenses with two actions? For example, "The sun having risen tomorrow, we will set out on our journey" I understand that the ‘having+ past ...
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What kind of grammatical construction is "He looked up at me, his harsh face expressionless"?

What kind of grammatical construction is this? Is it a participle? He looked up at me, his harsh face expressionless.
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verb-ing modifier trouble

I'm unexplainably confused about this topic. What does the following verb-ing clause modify? (noun) researchers or (action) have sent? How do we decide that? --> very important for me Is there any ...
Soner from The Ottoman Empire's user avatar
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...each with... (Absolute clauses)

For earlier generations, buying food or consumer products involved visiting several shops, each with the same limited range on offer. (Source.) Is marked phrase an absolute clause? I have made ...
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What is the name of this grammatical structure?

I found this structure while reading. Can anyone tell me what it is called? Aware of the situation, he answered the phone, and knowing what he has, he decided to enter the competition. Also, is ...
Goodie Good's user avatar
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Using absolute phrases to show reason

I was watching a video and announcer said this: "...over the weekend the LA Lakers gave away almost everything to the New Orleans Pelicans, the sole reason being to bring Anthony Davis to the ...
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Omitting "being" after subject in absolute phrases

As far as I know, we can omit "being" in the sentence 1 and 2. 1- He smiled at his girlfriend, her clothes (being) all muddy and tattered. 2- His Ipad (being) dead, he felt bored. Can I ...
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"He / his being..." In this context

John being a good teacher, his son never failed. With pronouns people make sentences like: He / his / him being a good teacher, his son never failed. He(subject pronoun) seems more appropriate to ...
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How to identify absolute phrases, and use them properly?

Absolute phrases seem to be crucial for constructing sentences. I do understand it. But sometimes I get confused, when is see one in a sentence. "We abandoned the car in a narrow street by the mosque ...
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What is this kind of phrase called?

The Source On June 22 last year, a dozen police officers raided his home and arrested him on a charge of plotting to flee to North Korea, a crime punishable by up to seven years in prison. Mr. Kwon ...
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Can an absolute phrase be followed by a modal verb?

The letter being written, he [modal verb] give you permission. Can anyone tell me is it okay if I use modal verbs after absolute phrases in the sentence as above?
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Mixing Absolute and Participle phrases

Would it be okay to mix absolute and participle phrases at the beginning of a sentence? 1- Sun shining, clouds smiling, climbing down a tree in glee, Sluggy, a happy, purple slug, strolls along to ...
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Can I say ' My pc having some faults, I returned it to the company.'

Can I say: My pc having had some problems, I returned it to the manufacturer. Instead of: As my pc had some problems, I returned....'' Similarly: He not coming, I won't go there. If ...
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Is this paraphrasing correct? "having broken down" --> "had broken down"

Over time, the temperatures would have stopped, solar radiation having broken down water molecules into ... Universe: The Solar System, Roger Freedman, ‎Robert Geller, ‎William J. Kaufmann, 2010 ...
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Which one is correct? why? if they both are correct, what's the difference in terms of meaning?

1- Once you reach the top, perhaps no one seeing you, you’ll be able to see top of the world. Occasionally, life means hardworking for a dream not seen by anyone other than you. Or 2-Once you ...
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Noun phrase type: Subject verb adverbial phrase, <noun phrase>

My brother laughed when his sister burped at the dinner table, a common occurrence when root beer was served. What does the phrase in bold modify above? And what is called? To my mind, burping is ...
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Doesn't this clause need a verb?

I came across this sentence in the novel "The Voyages of Doctor Doolittle" written by Huge Lofting: All of a sudden the Doctor looked up sharply at me, a wonderful smile of delighted understanding ...
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Absolute construction with or without "with"

When the volunteers catch wind of dire financial situation, they rent a stall at the flea market. Neighbours empty their cupboards and garages, with the money raised paying our living expenses. The ...
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Two absolute constructions with same meaning

The horsemen raced down the hill toward the settlers, their guns at the ready. This is an absolute construction. It does not have any verb. If I rewrite the above sentence in the following way, still ...
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When is 'being' used instead of 'am/is/are'?

Originally the pile of plush consisted of mohair or worsted yarn, but now silk by itself or with a cotton backing is used for plush, the distinction from velvet being found in the longer and less ...
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Synthesis of sentences

So, I am given these two sentences in exam to convert into one single sentence (without changing the meaning implied the original two sentences or using and, but, so, because conjunctions) (A) They ...
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The meaning of "Having done my homework I will go home."

Having done my homework I will go home. What does having mean in this sentence?
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Gerund (being sick) at the end of the sentence

I have doubts about the argument that it is impossible to express two independent facts by means of a gerund form, as I was told in my previous thread. That thought does not give me the rest. :) He ...
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Simplified text of Mark Twain: Should there be such a comma in this sentence?

The sentences below are from a simplified text of the short story "Luck" by Mark Twain. And I've found two different versions of the simplified text on Google, with or without a comma: Version 1:...
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There being no reasonable relationship

“There being” is allegedly an absolute phrase. Moreover, because “there being” is the present participle of “there be”, I'd like to learn how to parse/unravel “there be”, to determine/deduce this ...
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Identification of Fragments

How the following variations fragments? The comet has recently changed direction towards Jupiter, this development leading scientists to wonder about the composition of the object. The comet has ...
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"any other verbs then being located in VP" -- is this acceptable?

if the sentence you are analysing contains a modal verb, then it is positioned in ‘I’,any other verbs then being located in VP. (English Syntax and Argumentation - Bas Aarts) At first, I think ...
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Is 'The customer having left, ...' a dangling participle?

I found the following sentence in one of our questions: Use of "having" in English, The customer having left, the criminal takes out a pin from his purse and scrapes off hardened glue ...
Damkerng T.'s user avatar
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