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Questions tagged [adjective-phrases]

for questions about a phrase including an adjective and its modifiers that acts as an adjective.

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"The jury rendered a verdict of not guilty." — "noun phrase + of + adjective phrase" is an unusual word order to me. How to parse it?

britannica.com: (1) The jury rendered a verdict of not guilty. "Noun phrase + of + noun phrase" is a typical construction. But "noun phrase + of + adjective phrase" is a very ...
Loviii's user avatar
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1 answer
37 views

Where to add the adjective, before or after the noun?

We usually put the adjective before the noun, as in "a big apple". How about this case? I ate a bigger apple than Tom's. I ate an apple bigger than Tom's. Are they both grammatically ...
kuwabara's user avatar
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2 votes
1 answer
64 views

"It looked not (very) large." is correct with "very" but incorrect without, right?

The aim of this question is to understand the structure "not + modifier + adjective/adverb" better. Does it always sound natural? If not, then when can we use it and when not? the textbook &...
Loviii's user avatar
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103 views

Three dozen or three dozens

Three dozen of eggs are bought. Three dozens of eggs are bought. Which expression is correct and why?
Abid's user avatar
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1 answer
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Adjective phrase or adverb phrase

Norma ate in silence. The word 'ate' is a transitive verb that requires an object to clear its meaning. What is the function of the phrase 'in silence' here? Either it's serving as an adjectival ...
Abid's user avatar
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1 answer
36 views

Use of "emeritus" adjective [closed]

Can I use "emeritus" adjective colloquially (i.e., not necessarily in academia settings)?
t f's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
35 views

A participle phrase or An adjective phrase?

"You could find yourself blowing up at the smallest things, doing or saying things in the heat of the moment that you later regret." Let "doing or saying things in the heat of the ...
SungJin Park's user avatar
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2 answers
120 views

Meaning of "judicial emphasis"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVII, published 1892)[1]passage 271 “Yes; I think I understand,” said he. “Suppose I pass you my word that, whatever may have ...
philphil's user avatar
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Can "as a tool" modify more than one verb?

Consider this example sentence: The thing was owned, carried, or used as a tool. (1) Does the "as a tool" act as an adjective for each verb? Rewritten: "The thing was owned (as a ...
J. Daniel Musick's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
29 views

"employed people" vs "people employed"

Two sentences Manufacturing kept growing until 1980 when it peaked at about 10 million people employed. Manufacturing kept growing until 1980 when it peaked at about 10 million employed people. What ...
dmjy's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
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infinitive functioning as a noun or an adjective

I got him to repair the bike. In this sentence is the infinitive functioning as a noun or an adjective? Or without context is it just an <object + object compliment>?
sprbndt's user avatar
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3 answers
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The "shutdown database" or the "shut down database"?

I want to describe a database that is offline and turned off. I'm considering either "the shutdown database" or "the shut down database". I'm having trouble determining which one ...
Prilepinator's user avatar
2 votes
3 answers
330 views

Identifying a prepositional phrase as an adverb or adjective

I am having a difficult time identifying whether the prepositional phrase in the following sentence is acting as an adverb or an adjective. Here is the sentence: Did they really buy all the guys ...
Lilith Eleanor's user avatar
4 votes
4 answers
3k views

"I am select for the job" "I got/became select for the job"

Considering "select" as an adjective. Could we say "I am select for the job" and "I got/became select for the job"
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
-1 votes
1 answer
27 views

Please help; this is giving me an ulcer -walled, -wall, or no wall at all?

Okay, so I'm editing a book on architecture that's as poorly written as it is dry. My biggest issue right now is the use of the word "walled"; do you think this needs to be rewritten as ...
Bridget Manzella's user avatar
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1 answer
40 views

why does expensive goes before professional?

It's an expensive professional camera. In the above sentence, expensive and professional are opinion adjectives. So, why does expensive go before professional? Thank you!
Hồ Duy Lợi's user avatar
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1 answer
78 views

"Possible future event" or "future possible event"?

There is this rule for adjective order in English, and mostly, authors agree on it. These are the two resources that I found online that tell us about this rule(there are others). https://www....
banuyayi's user avatar
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1 answer
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killing a cash cow for

a. You are killing a cash cow for both of us. b. You are killing what is a cash cow for both of us. Are both of the above sentences grammatical and meaningful? My problem in (a) is that it seems to be ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
31 views

The tall man met Jane

a. The tall man met Jane, angry at herself. b. The tall woman went to the preacher, angry at himself. c. The tall man met her, angry at herself. d. The tall woman went to him, angry at himself. Are ...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
207 views

I AM WOKEN UP. Could i use "woken" here as an adjective/state instead of passive voice

I have not used "I am woken up" here as in passive voice but I have used "woken" as an adjective here and more or less the sentence is reffering to the state as in i woke up/i have ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
96 views

Adverb phrase vs adjective phrase …

Take this money and buy some bandages in the shop. Here in the shop — acts as a adjective or adverb. Because in the shop indicates place, it also modifies bandages so it can be adjective-like. So plz ...
Sam's user avatar
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1 answer
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"I get sick" Is "is" interchangeable with "'I am" as in "I am sick"

I know 'I got sick/ cold" mean "I became sick/cold" and "sick/cold" are used as adjectives but Here "Chime" said What does "I got sick" mean? 'got' is also ...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
0 votes
3 answers
1k views

"I got married" and "I have got married"

I know" I got married" could means "I was married" or "I became married but could it also mean "I have been married"? Similarly, I know "I have got married"...
Bilal Zafar's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
18 views

for three thousand dollars

Have you ever turned down job offers? a. Yes. If I don't like a job, I won't take it. I have turned down many job offers. As a matter of fact, yesterday, I turned down one for three thousand dollars a ...
azz's user avatar
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1 answer
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apples in the fridge

Can one say a. I ate apples in the fridge. instead of b. I ate apples that were in the fridge. I don't know why (a) sounds to me as if I was in the fridge when I ate the apples. "In the fridge&...
azz's user avatar
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1 vote
2 answers
40 views

What is the correct way to describe language courses based on the level?

I need to explain that there are lessons for beginner/intermediate/advanced learners. Since "beginner" is also a noun, I assume it's correct to say "Spanish lessons for beginners." ...
Karin's user avatar
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2 answers
123 views

Confusion between adjectival phrase and adverbial phrase

I passed the ball to him. Here, is "to him" modifying the object "ball" or the action verb "passed"? How can we know for sure? I have been to several websites before I ...
Kwan Hui's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
153 views

Is it okay to omit the first "as" in "as adj. as" in informal speech?

I think I sometimes hear sentences like "Much as I think ..." or "Soon as he ...". I'm not certain, but when the "as adj. as" form comes at the beginning of the sentence, ...
xiver77's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
29 views

'Deep water' is a/the story [closed]

Read the following sentences ' Deep Water ' is a story about Michael's childhood . ' Deep Water ' is the story about Michael's childhood . How are they two different I just want to know how a noun ...
Bla Bbaa's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
129 views

Adverbial or Adjectival Phrase?

I'm confused about adjectival and adverbial participle phrases. It came to pass that, settling permanently in Paris he, too, forgot the child, especially when the Revolution of February broke out, ...
kumkedisi's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
38 views

“The town is (located) 20km southeast of city X” [closed]

The town is (located) 20 km southeast of city X Is southeast an adjective being modified by of city X (an adverb phrase) and having 20 km (an adverb) modifying it? Or is 20km an adjective modifying ...
Alienxalienz's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
85 views

Does "to show" function as an adverb modifying an adjective in this sentence? [closed]

Does the usage of the infinitive to show serve the purpose the task below? Task: write a sentence using the infinitive "to show" as an adverb modifying an adjective. I tried to use "to ...
Maria Rodriguez's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
70 views

What is the type of the phrase "to success"

The textbook says that To success is an adjective phrase but it seems like an infinitive to me. I'm confused whether it is a noun or an infinitive?
Maria Rodriguez's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
76 views

Why the infinitive phrase in this sentence functions as Adverb and not adjective?

Marian had plenty of work to finish In the correction form, it says that the function of to finish is adverbial. But why it is not an adjective? Which work? The work to finish. So it is an adjective!!...
Maria Rodriguez's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
40 views

talked to the young lady,

a. I spoke to a doctor, tall and handsome. b. I spoke to a young woman, magnificently dressed. c. I spoke to the doctor, tall and handsome. d. I spoke to the young woman, magnificently dressed. Are ...
azz's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
26 views

‘noun + likely to + verb’ and ‘likely to + verb + noun’

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? If yes, which one does sound more idiomatic? Modularization by design decision likely to change. Modularization by likely to change design decision. ...
Géry Ogam's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
52 views

an adjective phrase and an introductory clause

In an English text, I happened upon a sentence like the following. ____________ no money, I cannot buy that lovely house. A. Having B. If having which of those is a correct answer to the sentence? I ...
bak1936's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
24 views

Is the noun phrase 'side lengths to the nearest tenth' grammatically correct?

Here is a sentence extracted from the entire question sentences, one from this exercise page on Khan Academy. The following figure shows △ABC with side lengths to the nearest tenth. I thought the ...
catwith's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
45 views

Order adjectives when using nationalities or geographic names + characteristics

I am a bit confused with the adjectives order when I need to use adjectives that indicate nationality and adjectives that indicate characteristics of an object. Is it, for instance, Indian traditional ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
58 views

Is this prepositional phrase adjective or adverb?

Is this prepositional phrase "with same sex quickstep" an adjective describing "history" or adverb modifying "makes in the sentence below? Andrew Makes ‘Dancing With The ...
Anna's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
95 views

A phrase function : adverb phrase or adjective phrase

In a text book, there is a sentence which I can't analyze. She's very conventional in her views. Is a preposition phrase(in her views) an adverb phrase or an adjective phrase? , Or does it function ...
bak1936's user avatar
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0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Is the prepositional phrase an adverbial or adjective phrase

In the sentence quoted below are the prepositions "for 2021" and "without latest software" acting as an adjective or adverb? "Fossil announces new smartwatches for 2021 ...
Anna's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
41 views

the significance of an adjective in front of an preposition "of "

In general, an noun or an pronoun is located in front of an preposition "of". By the way, I happen upon some sentences including an adjective. The gallery is full of people. The society is ...
bak1936's user avatar
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-1 votes
2 answers
45 views

Can I say “3 meters lengthened”?

I found “a 3 meters long door” is correct. I also want to know if “a 3 meters lengthened door (3m+3m=6m).”
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
1k views

What is exact meaning of "fewer than" concerning numbers

Letters: These are short submissions that contain important new results and are intended for faster publication. Letters are given priority handling. While there is no page limit, typical letters are ...
user48953094's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
383 views

Why is “fortunate” correct here? shouldn’t it be “fortunate enough”?

Yesterday, when we were returning from the party,(a)/ our car met with an accident,(b)/ but we were fortunate to reach our home safely.(c)/ No error (d) The answer is (d), but according to me it ...
Tatai's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
530 views

Should I place a comma between the two dependent clauses?

Here are the two examples; please tell me if I should place a comma between the two dependent clauses that come before the main clause. I'd also like an explanation, please. Example# 1: (with a comma) ...
Ellis's user avatar
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0 votes
1 answer
81 views

Adjective related query

Consider the following sentence: Anne drank a glass of hot milk. Here, milk is a noun and hot is an adjective. What is "a glass of"?
equinox's user avatar
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6 votes
8 answers
4k views

Is "100% correct pronunciation" an understandable, correct, and proper English expression?

If I put "100% correct pronunciation" in the following sentence, is it understandable and correct? "100%" is what I would like to emphasize. If it is not right, how should it be ...
questionguy's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
53 views

He has been a victim of fraud

He has been a victim of fraud. He has been a victim of fraud on several occasions. He has been very helpful. He has been very helpful on several occasions. What is the difference between (1) and (...
Mr. X's user avatar
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