Questions tagged [adjective-phrases]

for questions about a phrase including an adjective and its modifiers that acts as an adjective.

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1answer
9 views

what is the purpose of reducing an adjective clause

If we come across an adjective phrase reduced from an adjective clause, how could we know in what tense the participle, so-called a non-finite verb, takes place? for instance: Yesterday I met a man ...
-2
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0answers
25 views

My Friend Is A Lawyer Experienced In These Matters [closed]

My friend is a lawyer experienced in these matters. (without a comma) My friend is a lawyer, experienced in these matters. (with a comma after "lawyer") My friend is a lawyer, who is ...
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1answer
31 views

thatched-roof huts - wrong position of words?

There is correct pattern to say complex adjectives: adjcective+noun+ed. For example: green-eyed, tall-stalked. But in my book I have stumbled onto word "thatched-roof" with words other way ...
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1answer
14 views

What's the function of cash-in-transit in the phrase cash-in-transit heists

What's the exact function of "cash-in-transit" here? Grammar books say that "a state-of-the-art computer" is the equal to "a computer which is the state of the art" and &...
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1answer
21 views

Can I say “The country's ongoing widely discussed problems are hopeless”

Can I use the combination of "adjective + adverb + adjective + noun" like The country's ongoing widely discussed problems are hopeless. (Or instead do I need to say ongoing widely-discussed ...
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2answers
44 views

Can the adjective phrase describe the object of a sentence like this?

Could you please tell me if the sentences I have written are grammatically correct? Can I use adjectives to describe the object of the sentence like this: He hung the flowers on the wall, dried and ...
33
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3answers
168k views

“a ten years old boy” or “a ten year old boy”

1) a ten years old boy is sitting on the couch. 2) a ten year old boy is sitting on the couch. 3) a ten-years old boy is sitting on the couch. 4) a ten-year old boy is sitting on the ...
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2answers
69 views

Parallelizable vs. Parallelable

Which sentence is correct and meaningful? The following computer algorithm is highly parallelizable. The following computer algorithm is highly parallelable.
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0answers
24 views

Asking about phrase type

‎In a noun phrase “billions of dollars’ worth of satellites” Is “billions of dollars’ worth of” an adjective phrase that modifies ‘satellites’?
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1answer
82 views

The meaning of “late” in “the late Buddy Holly”

I came across an expression "the late Buddy Holly" and additionally gathered two more examples of it, all of which I don't understand. The rock 'n roll revival has provoked the Record ...
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1answer
237 views

“other than” or “different from”?

Consider: There are three balls: one is 1kg, another is 3kg, and the other is 5kg. I am trying to describe the ball of 3kg in a complicated way as follows: I need one ball other than/different ...
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0answers
17 views

Which is better in this context – AdjP or NP as a subject complement?

When I need to describe myself (for instance in a letter to a potential employer or the like), should I use a NP headed by "person" as a subject complement, or just an AdjP? That is, which ...
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1answer
44 views

“The Dancing Queen” is using dancing applicable here?

I was watching a movie last night and It was a musical one. The movie involved a song named "The Dancing Queen". Now, I know that the word "Dancing" is not an adjective. For ...
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2answers
6k views

There is a little water in the pot. There is some water in the pot

There is a little water in the pot. There is some water in the pot. What is the difference between them? How can I distinguish these sentences? I am a bit confused.
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1answer
15 views

Please explain the use of the word Easy in this sentence

The tennis player, easy through the opening set against her opponent, rallied to take the final two sets for the biggest victory of her young career. Of the following pattern, which one is implied ...
0
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1answer
27 views

A noun before an adjective without a verb

The children surrounded the new writer, their eyes and mouths wide open Why this sentece is correct? As far as I know "open" has an adjective phrase functioning. So, shouldn't we write ...
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1answer
43 views

“a lump the size of a golf ball” or “of the size” or “a golf-ball-sized lump”?

Which one of them is grammatically correct? a lump the size of a golf ball a lump of the size of a golf ball a golf-ball-sized lump Which one of them is used more in daily language specifically in ...
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1answer
22 views

Reduction in adjective clause and OVS

Backlash against a new Chinese television drama about its fight against Covid-19 underscores the challenges facing Beijing as it attempts to steer the narrative about its handling of the pandemic. ( ...
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1answer
28 views

What's in a name?… Wait, or is there?

This might sound as a trivial question but it's been on my mind for a while now, and so I am asking it. Isn't the use of the word "adjective" in "adjective phrase/clause" erroneous?...
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2answers
199 views

The police questioned everyone in the room. Here “in the room” is an adjective phrase or an adverb phrase

The police questioned everyone in the room. Here "in the room" is an adjective phrase or an adverb phrase I think it is an adverb phrase.But some of the teachers of our country think it an ...
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1answer
37 views

oneself + gerund

The U.S. Postal Service, itself teetering on the brink of insolvency, is ill equipped to handle the surge. Why not “its teetering on the brink of insolvency or it teetering on the brink of insolvency?...
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1answer
48 views

Question about reduced relative clauses: Can “having…” mean both “which had… ” and “which have…”?

I saw a question today asking which one is correct, and the answer is (2) (1) Literacy opened up entire realms of verifiable knowledge to ordinary men and women having been previously considered ...
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2answers
54 views

'prevent from willing participating' or 'prevent from willingly participating'?

'prevent from willing participating' or 'prevent from willingly participating'? For example: His active vocabulary is rather limited, but this doesn’t prevent him from willingly participating in ...
2
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1answer
534 views

Whether 'not to-infinitive' can be used after 'too + adj'

She was so angry that she tore up the letter. Can I rewrite the sentence like the following? She was too angry not to tear up the letter. In English, I'd like to know whether 'not to-infinitive' ...
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1answer
27 views

You don’t sound like… vs You don’t sound

Could you say which sentence is more used if both are correct? You don’t sound American. vs You don’t sound like American. TIA
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1answer
24 views

should we use a dash “-” between words of an adjective when omit a noun?

I know the question may seem too vague and weird, so let's go right to the example for more clarification: Scholars ask the-upper-class countries to help the-lower-class in the breakout of the ...
3
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2answers
179 views

Is the phrase “back to the Muggle world” an adjective or adverbial one?

People jostled them as they moved forward toward the gateway back to the Muggle world. (Harry Potter) Is the phrase "back to the Muggle world" an adjective or adverbial one?
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0answers
107 views

reduction of an adjective clause that modifies a whole sentence to an adjective phrase

I know there’s a universal agreement that an adjective clause can be reduced to an adjective phrase. However, I’d like to know whether the same rule could apply to the informal use of an adjective ...
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1answer
125 views

“a suitable man for” or “a man suitable for”

He is a suitable man for any post. He is a man suitable for any post. Which of the following sentences is correct? What is the difference in meaning between these?
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3answers
3k views

Is “release date” grammatically correct?

Why I always heard something like "Iphone release date and price unveiled". Shouldn't it be "be released" by someone? (Iphone can't release anything itself as a lifeless object) I look up some the ...
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2answers
44 views

Using adjectives with the hyphen (-) [duplicate]

I know that some adjectives are written after the hyphen "-" like sentence one below. Actually I don't know the grammatical rule behind that, but could I replace sentence one with sentence two? ...
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0answers
25 views

What sentences are applicable? [closed]

Which of the following is ok and sounds kind of natural ?? 1- It has a quality higher than usual. 2- It has a higher quality than usual. 3- It has a quality higher than usual. 4- It has a higher ...
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2answers
31 views

“Declined” Vs “Declining”

She glossed over the company's declining profits. ( original text) Can I use the word "declined" instead of "declining" so that the sentence becomes as follows : She glossed over the company's ...
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1answer
18 views

Which sentences are ok to use?

Which of the following makes sense to use : 1- I feel fatigue. 2- I feel fatigued. 3- I perceive fatigue in your voice. 4- I sense fatigue in your voice.
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23 views

sentence construction after preposition, such as “due to”, “because of”

Are the following sentences wrong? When I read them, I can't sense any wrong and all the same. Would you mind explaining their reasons if a wrong exists? The official was on leave yesterday owing to ...
1
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1answer
5k views

Adjective clauses with prepositions

Are all of the following sentences correct? New York is a city to which I have traveled many times. New York is a city which I have traveled to many times (not "many times to"?). This is the problem ...
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1answer
546 views

The Questions which are easy to understand” vs “The easy-to-understand questions”

What do we call the following kind of adjective? I saw a text similar to the following the easy-to-understand questions are so important to make our decisions! I have two questions ...
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0answers
301 views

Can you say “everything is good” as well was “everything is well” [duplicate]

Is it grammatically correct to say "everything is good"? And why is "everything is well" correct? Isn't "well" an adverb? Edit: I'm looking for an answer for this phrase specifically.
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2answers
62 views

What is the adjective/phrase that best describes an inconsistent/irregular weekly earnings pattern?

This is a word- or phrase-request question. Question: What is the pair of adjectives that best describe a [consistent/regular] weekly earnings pattern and an [inconsistent/irregular] weekly ...
1
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1answer
61 views

Home vs at home

I'm at home. I usually take my breakfast home (without preposition). I usually take my breakfast at home(or at my home ;with preposition) In the first sentence, at home is an adjective preposition ...
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1answer
25 views

possessive form or adjectival noun

I cannot see a pattern or rule that enables me to decide whether I should use possession structure or adjectival noun. election results: No one writes election's results and election is a modifier ...
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1answer
262 views

“Your clothes are small size” — Is this grammatical?

I am having trouble with this sentence: Your clothes are small size. Would it be correct if I changed it to either: 1) Your clothes are small-sized. (=adjective) 2) Your clothes are small ...
1
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1answer
62 views

Wormlike, worm-like or worm like?

How does one write that something is like something else using "like" as a suffix? Possibilities that come to my mind are: X-like Xlike X like Which of these forms are most common? X could be a ...
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2answers
601 views

Can “In a timely manner/fashion” describe a noun?

I want to use the phrase "in a timely manner" like this: Such a timely manner answer! It is supposed to function as an adjective that describes the noun "answer", but I find it awkward beside the ...
0
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1answer
73 views

“That three days ago comment” - when referring to a comment

Is it correct to specify the period of a comment since its insertion when referring to it, like instead of saying: There is a comment that has been submitted three days ago in which it has gained ...
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1answer
132 views

Adjuncts in front position: Do they provide the reason behind the main clause's action?

I'm having an argument with a friend about the role of predicative adjuncts in front position and whether they modify the reason behind the action in the main clause. Examples: "Tired and sleepy, she ...
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0answers
18 views

Using adverbs or adjectives before “present participle adjectives”

I am not sure about the difference between using "ly-formed adverbs" and using "sole adjectives" before "present participle adjectives". I think in the first sentence "relentless" qualify "beating ...
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2answers
224 views

Comparison grammar in The Lord of the Rings

I was reading The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers and I came across a sentence in which I don't fully understand its grammar. ..., and when they rose taller they seemed than mortal men. I think ...
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1answer
447 views

Reduction grammar [closed]

Is the below an adjective phrase? "to keep something warm, causing it to develop, esp. to keep eggs warm until the young are born:"
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2answers
40 views

What is the word-building of “health aware” and “autonomy-supportive”?

I have seen such patterns several times but don't know what the pattern is. For instance this title: Autonomy-Supportive Teaching: What It Is, How to Do It and this also this one: Health-Aware Model-...