Questions tagged [adjective-phrases]

for questions about a phrase including an adjective and its modifiers that acts as an adjective.

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33
votes
3answers
168k views

“a ten years old boy” or “a ten year old boy”

1) a ten years old boy is sitting on the couch. 2) a ten year old boy is sitting on the couch. 3) a ten-years old boy is sitting on the couch. 4) a ten-year old boy is sitting on the ...
29
votes
7answers
12k views

“I’m too tired to drive”: Why does removing 'too' make this sentence ungrammatical?

This is grammatical: I'm too tired to drive. but this isn't: I'm tired to drive. Why? How can removing an adverb make a sentence ungrammatical? In a sentence like “He slowly walked down the ...
10
votes
5answers
25k views

How can I figure out whether a word is an adverb or an adjective?

How can we confirm the word modifying an adjective is an adverb which may well be adjective sometimes? In this sentence, what are the parts of speech of 'bright' and 'red'? She wore a bright red ...
9
votes
3answers
3k views

Is “release date” grammatically correct?

Why I always heard something like "Iphone release date and price unveiled". Shouldn't it be "be released" by someone? (Iphone can't release anything itself as a lifeless object) I look up some the ...
9
votes
1answer
14k views

Can we use adjective after noun?

People angry with the high prices were protesting. Can we use adjective after noun without verb to be like the example above? Can you tell me what grammar rule is it?
7
votes
3answers
663 views

Mary's house is near to/next to the hair salon.

Mary's house is _____ the hair salon. Do you think you can find it? a. Near to b. Next to When I was filling out this question, my answer was "near to" but is wrong according to the page. So ...
7
votes
3answers
909 views

Can the subject be an adjective phrase, adverb phrase, or a bare infinitival clause?

This is an exercise in Chapter 5 of a textbook by Bas Aarts, English Syntax and Argumentation, 4th edition, published 2013, on page 88: In previous editions of this book I allowed for adjective ...
6
votes
1answer
8k views

Can we use “much more superior”?

My game is much more superior to yours. Can we use much more in this sentence?
6
votes
4answers
826 views

compound adjective or phrase?

I know some phrases can make up compound adjectives. But how can I tell if it is an adjective or not? Examples: I threw away the worn-out socks. (compound adjective) I put the socks worn ...
5
votes
3answers
761 views

Is 'a' implying one of the family?

Mr. Dursley hummed as he picked out his most boring tie for work, and Mrs. Dursley gossiped away happily as she wrestled a screaming Dudley into his high chair. (Harry Potter) Why is ‘a’ put, ...
5
votes
4answers
2k views

Too big of a sofa

These kinds of expressions akin to measure quantifiers just blow my mind. For me it has to be "too big gulp of whiskey" and "too big sofa". Especially c), it sounds like you placed ...
5
votes
2answers
6k views

There is a little water in the pot. There is some water in the pot

There is a little water in the pot. There is some water in the pot. What is the difference between them? How can I distinguish these sentences? I am a bit confused.
5
votes
2answers
185 views

How does this “varying with age…” phrase relate to the rest of the sentence?

I understand the meaning but I don't fully get the grammatical point of bolded phrase; If "varying with age and the nature of the forest" is adjective phrase for the noun, "the precise number of ...
4
votes
2answers
803 views

How to say if I want to select a few largest sizes of apples?

I want to say, for example, I have many apples, I want to select some apples according to the descending order of size, but I don't want to explicitly mention how many apples I select, I just select ...
4
votes
1answer
1k views

What is the difference between first hand and hands-on?

For example, which one fits in this context better? Working as a teacher, she has hands-on experience with suspected drug user students. Working as a teacher, she has first hand experience with ...
4
votes
3answers
505 views

adverb phrase or adjective phrase

You can take a short ferry ride from the city of Surabaya to Madura for a heart-stopping bull race, filled with excitement. In the sentence, is the phrase "filled with excitement" adverb phrase or ...
3
votes
2answers
179 views

Is the phrase “back to the Muggle world” an adjective or adverbial one?

People jostled them as they moved forward toward the gateway back to the Muggle world. (Harry Potter) Is the phrase "back to the Muggle world" an adjective or adverbial one?
3
votes
1answer
35 views

Can an indefinite article be used with plural noun “units”?

In one of my network textbooks, a text is as: The difference is simply a constant 10 units for time greater than 2 seconds. The article "a" does not seem to be fit with plural "units". Am I wrong? ...
3
votes
1answer
150 views

Subject or object adjective clause (comma's necessity)

I can't clear up to which type of adjective clause the following refers. I can't say I'm the best challenger that has ever applied for this aid. In object clauses we are able to omit "that" or ...
3
votes
2answers
306 views

One seldom upset

I'm currently reading Flowers in the Attic and found this sentence that has been bugging me for a while. My eyes widened. Such a vehement outburst from one seldom upset took me completely by ...
3
votes
2answers
155 views

Is the position of “related to moving to a new house” alright in this sentence?

I would like to know if the expression in bold below is correct. I cannot have a long talk now. Let's talk later. I am doing something with my mom related to moving to a new house. This could be a ...
3
votes
1answer
609 views

grammatical function of “about to”

He is about to open the door. What part of speech is "about to" in this sentence? Is it an adjective, or an adverb? I am really confused, and somewhere I read that it is idiomatic as well.
3
votes
1answer
221 views

“majority English speaking” country

Please suppose USA includes majority English speaking U.S. territories. If I used the expression 'majority English speaking' out of the blue, would you instantly understand it meant US territories ...
3
votes
1answer
828 views

Is “there are two cars available for selection” correct?

Is the following sentence correct? There are two cars available for selection If yes, why can the clause "available for selection" put behind the clause "There are two cars" without any ...
3
votes
2answers
151 views

position of adjective when the noun is followed by preposition

Where should I place an adjective when the noun is followed by a preposition? Which is the right way to use of the below sentences? He is a suitable man for any post. Or He is a man ...
2
votes
3answers
2k views

Which sentence is grammatically incorrect?

It is fun to talk with foreigners. Do you have something to eat? This is a deep lake to swim. She must be warm-hearted to help you. She lived to be ninety. On the answer sheet, the answer ...
2
votes
3answers
386 views

what is the function of “a foot” in this sentence?

"Tsunami waves may appear only a foot or so high." Does "a foot" function as an adverbial phrase or subject complement?
2
votes
1answer
262 views

“Your clothes are small size” — Is this grammatical?

I am having trouble with this sentence: Your clothes are small size. Would it be correct if I changed it to either: 1) Your clothes are small-sized. (=adjective) 2) Your clothes are small ...
2
votes
1answer
206 views

How should I understand “of the 8th”?

I found this sentence: Ancient Greece was a civilization belonging to a period of Greek history that lasted from the Archaic period of the 8th to 6th centuries BC to the end of antiquity (ca. AD ...
2
votes
1answer
568 views

It was the most helpless I have ever felt in my life - what does “the most helpless” mean?

An excerpt from Tuesdays with Morrie: At the same time, I had my first serious encounter with death. My favorite uncle, my mother’s brother, the man who had taught me music, taught me to drive, ...
2
votes
2answers
132 views

Should 'to be' be involved or it's optional?

Context: "The nervous system was so complex and highly developed as to leave Lake aghast. Though excessively primitive and archaic in some respects, the thing had a set of ganglial centres and ...
2
votes
2answers
899 views

Usage of “at its zenith”

Excerpted from The New Yorker: Eliot thought that a classic, in the strictest sense, was a work that apotheosized a great civilization at its zenith; so exacting (or, if you like, priggish) are his ...
2
votes
1answer
45 views

“yellow useless part” or “useless yellow part”?

This may be a simple question but it has me confused. Is it "yellow useless part" or "useless yellow part" in the sentence below? He threw the yellow useless part of cigarette. By useless yellow ...
2
votes
1answer
7k views

With whom you Spoke, or With whom you spoke with? [duplicate]

Example: Mark, with whom you spoke at the party, will be joining us. or is it Mark, with whom you spoke with at the party, will be....
2
votes
1answer
10k views

Unsure vs not sure

We are unsure of what is requested? We are not sure of what is requested? Which one should should be used and why? Is there any difference between the two? TIA
2
votes
1answer
2k views

being highly thought of in something

What is the meaning of following sentence? He is highly thought of in racing. When the moderator mentioned his books, saying that they were highly thought of by scholars... She is ...
2
votes
1answer
80 views

What is the grammatically difference between these two sentences?

Does the only difference is "being continuous"? what is the difference in terms of meaning? ... with a symbol used to express ... . ... with a symbol being used to express ... .
2
votes
2answers
68 views

How to name correctly categories marked as grey or black

Suppose there is online store with hundreds of categories. Some are inactive or disabled. The other ones can be browsed and are enabled. Respectively, inactive are greyed out, active ones are marked ...
2
votes
1answer
145 views

Is this sentence grammatically correct? “the birth a planet the size of Jupiter”

Consider: Scientists recently witnessed the birth a planet the size of Jupiter... You can find the original article here. I have two questions: I think it must be the birth "of" a planet, ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Does healthy or strong go first when used together?

He is a strong healthy man. He is a healthy strong man. Which is the correct answer and why?
2
votes
2answers
224 views

Comparison grammar in The Lord of the Rings

I was reading The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers and I came across a sentence in which I don't fully understand its grammar. ..., and when they rose taller they seemed than mortal men. I think ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

'get up to speed with' or 'get up to speed on'

A) We work to ensure that our technical staff are up to speed on new technologies. B) We work to ensure that our technical staff are up to speed with new technologies. C) We work to ensure ...
2
votes
2answers
67 views

Shouldn't it be “Milo Yiannopoulos–endorsing activists”?

I came across a sentence in a fresh Buzzfeed article: At the California College Republicans Convention this spring, a war was brewing between loud, unapologetic, Milo Yiannopoulos–endorsed ...
2
votes
1answer
181 views

Determiner, Adjective

Context: She has known him for more than ten years. In the above mentioned sentence, every word can separately be analyzed grammatically. For example: She is a subject / pronoun. has + known = ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

Why do you need to say 'something new', but not 'new something'?

Why you can't put 'new' in front of 'something' to use 'new' as adjective to describe 'something'?
2
votes
1answer
317 views

Function of participle clause: … switch back and forth, alternating their positions …

I am trying to determine the function of the participle phrase in the following sentence: When they play, they switch back and forth, alternating their positions until the game ends. Is the ...
2
votes
2answers
21k views

How “long gone” can be used in a sentence

"Long gone" is a phrase which means "gone a long time ago; used up a long time ago" according to this link. The following sentences are some samples of its usage: The ice cream and cake are long ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Question about reduced relative clauses: Can “having…” mean both “which had… ” and “which have…”?

I saw a question today asking which one is correct, and the answer is (2) (1) Literacy opened up entire realms of verifiable knowledge to ordinary men and women having been previously considered ...
2
votes
1answer
217 views

Adjective to describe that a date is now in the past

I'm trying to formulate to a website user that he can't modify a date anymore because this date is now in the past. So for I'm at "You can't modify a campaign start date after it's exceeded" (...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Is there a difference in meaning between these two phrases?

First phrase Computer speed-up and repair Second phrase Speed-up and repair of computer Is there a difference in meaning between these two phrases? Which of these phrases is more suitable for ...