Questions tagged [adjective-phrases]

for questions about a phrase including an adjective and its modifiers that acts as an adjective.

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1answer
16 views

‘noun + likely to + verb’ and ‘likely to + verb + noun’

Are the following sentences grammatically correct? If yes, which one does sound more idiomatic? Modularization by design decision likely to change. Modularization by likely to change design decision. ...
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2answers
26 views

an adjective phrase and an introductory clause

In an English text, I happened upon a sentence like the following. ____________ no money, I cannot buy that lovely house. A. Having B. If having which of those is a correct answer to the sentence? I ...
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1answer
18 views

Is the noun phrase 'side lengths to the nearest tenth' grammatically correct?

Here is a sentence extracted from the entire question sentences, one from this exercise page on Khan Academy. The following figure shows △ABC with side lengths to the nearest tenth. I thought the ...
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2answers
23 views

Order adjectives when using nationalities or geographic names + characteristics

I am a bit confused with the adjectives order when I need to use adjectives that indicate nationality and adjectives that indicate characteristics of an object. Is it, for instance, Indian traditional ...
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0answers
7 views

whether it is a subject complement or a adjective complement

1.Hard work is fundamental to success. In a sentence above, whether is the PP "to success" an subjective complement or a adjective comeplement? and 2.Hard work to success is fundamental. ...
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1answer
37 views

Is this prepositional phrase adjective or adverb?

Is this prepositional phrase "with same sex quickstep" an adjective describing "history" or adverb modifying "makes in the sentence below? Andrew Makes ‘Dancing With The ...
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2answers
48 views

A phrase function : adverb phrase or adjective phrase

In text book, there is a sentence which I can't analyze. She's very conventional in her views. Is a preposition phrase(in her views) an adverb phrase or an adjective phrase? , Or does it function a ...
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0answers
30 views

Is the prepositional phrase an adverbial or adjective phrase

In the sentence quoted below are the prepositions "for 2021" and "without latest software" acting as an adjective or adverb? "Fossil announces new smartwatches for 2021 ...
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2answers
20 views

the significance of an adjective in front of an preposition "of "

In general, an noun or an pronoun is located in front of an preposition "of". By the way, I happen upon some sentences including an adjective. The gallery is full of people. The society is ...
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2answers
30 views

Can I say “3 meters lengthened”?

I found “a 3 meters long door” is correct. I also want to know if “a 3 meters lengthened door (3m+3m=6m).”
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1answer
19 views

What is exact meaning of "fewer than" concerning numbers

Letters: These are short submissions that contain important new results and are intended for faster publication. Letters are given priority handling. While there is no page limit, typical letters are ...
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1answer
57 views

Why is “fortunate” correct here? shouldn’t it be “fortunate enough”?

Yesterday, when we were returning from the party,(a)/ our car met with an accident,(b)/ but we were fortunate to reach our home safely.(c)/ No error (d) The answer is (d), but according to me it ...
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1answer
26 views

Should I place a comma between the two dependent clauses?

Here are the two examples; please tell me if I should place a comma between the two dependent clauses that come before the main clause. I'd also like an explanation, please. Example# 1: (with a comma) ...
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1answer
32 views

Adjective related query

Consider the following sentence: Anne drank a glass of hot milk. Here, milk is a noun and hot is an adjective. What is "a glass of"?
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9answers
3k views

Is "100% correct pronunciation" an understandable, correct, and proper English expression?

If I put "100% correct pronunciation" in the following sentence, is it understandable and correct? "100%" is what I would like to emphasize. If it is not right, how should it be ...
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0answers
47 views

He has been a victim of fraud

He has been a victim of fraud. He has been a victim of fraud on several occasions. He has been very helpful. He has been very helpful on several occasions. What is the difference between (1) and (...
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20 views

what is the purpose of reducing an adjective clause

If we come across an adjective phrase reduced from an adjective clause, how could we know in what tense the participle, so-called a non-finite verb, takes place? for instance: Yesterday I met a man ...
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1answer
17 views

What's the function of cash-in-transit in the phrase cash-in-transit heists

What's the exact function of "cash-in-transit" here? Grammar books say that "a state-of-the-art computer" is the equal to "a computer which is the state of the art" and &...
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1answer
22 views

Can I say "The country's ongoing widely discussed problems are hopeless"

Can I use the combination of "adjective + adverb + adjective + noun" like The country's ongoing widely discussed problems are hopeless. (Or instead do I need to say ongoing widely-discussed ...
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0answers
24 views

Asking about phrase type

‎In a noun phrase “billions of dollars’ worth of satellites” Is “billions of dollars’ worth of” an adjective phrase that modifies ‘satellites’?
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1answer
83 views

The meaning of "late" in "the late Buddy Holly"

I came across an expression "the late Buddy Holly" and additionally gathered two more examples of it, all of which I don't understand. The rock 'n roll revival has provoked the Record ...
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0answers
18 views

Which is better in this context – AdjP or NP as a subject complement?

When I need to describe myself (for instance in a letter to a potential employer or the like), should I use a NP headed by "person" as a subject complement, or just an AdjP? That is, which ...
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1answer
59 views

"The Dancing Queen" is using dancing applicable here?

I was watching a movie last night and It was a musical one. The movie involved a song named "The Dancing Queen". Now, I know that the word "Dancing" is not an adjective. For ...
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1answer
15 views

Please explain the use of the word Easy in this sentence

The tennis player, easy through the opening set against her opponent, rallied to take the final two sets for the biggest victory of her young career. Of the following pattern, which one is implied ...
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1answer
29 views

A noun before an adjective without a verb

The children surrounded the new writer, their eyes and mouths wide open Why this sentece is correct? As far as I know "open" has an adjective phrase functioning. So, shouldn't we write ...
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1answer
59 views

“a lump the size of a golf ball” or “of the size” or “a golf-ball-sized lump”?

Which one of them is grammatically correct? a lump the size of a golf ball a lump of the size of a golf ball a golf-ball-sized lump Which one of them is used more in daily language specifically in ...
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1answer
23 views

Reduction in adjective clause and OVS

Backlash against a new Chinese television drama about its fight against Covid-19 underscores the challenges facing Beijing as it attempts to steer the narrative about its handling of the pandemic. ( ...
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1answer
28 views

What's in a name?... Wait, or is there?

This might sound as a trivial question but it's been on my mind for a while now, and so I am asking it. Isn't the use of the word "adjective" in "adjective phrase/clause" erroneous?...
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2answers
258 views

The police questioned everyone in the room. Here "in the room" is an adjective phrase or an adverb phrase

The police questioned everyone in the room. Here "in the room" is an adjective phrase or an adverb phrase I think it is an adverb phrase.But some of the teachers of our country think it an ...
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1answer
43 views

oneself + gerund

The U.S. Postal Service, itself teetering on the brink of insolvency, is ill equipped to handle the surge. Why not “its teetering on the brink of insolvency or it teetering on the brink of insolvency?...
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1answer
49 views

Question about reduced relative clauses: Can "having..." mean both "which had... " and "which have..."?

I saw a question today asking which one is correct, and the answer is (2) (1) Literacy opened up entire realms of verifiable knowledge to ordinary men and women having been previously considered ...
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1answer
34 views

thatched-roof huts - wrong position of words?

There is correct pattern to say complex adjectives: adjcective+noun+ed. For example: green-eyed, tall-stalked. But in my book I have stumbled onto word "thatched-roof" with words other way ...
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2answers
63 views

'prevent from willing participating' or 'prevent from willingly participating'?

'prevent from willing participating' or 'prevent from willingly participating'? For example: His active vocabulary is rather limited, but this doesn’t prevent him from willingly participating in ...
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92 views

Parallelizable vs. Parallelable

Which sentence is correct and meaningful? The following computer algorithm is highly parallelizable. The following computer algorithm is highly parallelable.
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40 views

You don’t sound like... vs You don’t sound

Could you say which sentence is more used if both are correct? You don’t sound American. vs You don’t sound like American. TIA
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1answer
26 views

should we use a dash "-" between words of an adjective when omit a noun?

I know the question may seem too vague and weird, so let's go right to the example for more clarification: Scholars ask the-upper-class countries to help the-lower-class in the breakout of the ...
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0answers
114 views

reduction of an adjective clause that modifies a whole sentence to an adjective phrase

I know there’s a universal agreement that an adjective clause can be reduced to an adjective phrase. However, I’d like to know whether the same rule could apply to the informal use of an adjective ...
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2answers
49 views

Using adjectives with the hyphen (-) [duplicate]

I know that some adjectives are written after the hyphen "-" like sentence one below. Actually I don't know the grammatical rule behind that, but could I replace sentence one with sentence two? ...
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1answer
150 views

"a suitable man for" or "a man suitable for"

He is a suitable man for any post. He is a man suitable for any post. Which of the following sentences is correct? What is the difference in meaning between these?
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25 views

What sentences are applicable? [closed]

Which of the following is ok and sounds kind of natural ?? 1- It has a quality higher than usual. 2- It has a higher quality than usual. 3- It has a quality higher than usual. 4- It has a higher ...
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2answers
31 views

"Declined" Vs "Declining"

She glossed over the company's declining profits. ( original text) Can I use the word "declined" instead of "declining" so that the sentence becomes as follows : She glossed over the company's ...
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1answer
18 views

Which sentences are ok to use?

Which of the following makes sense to use : 1- I feel fatigue. 2- I feel fatigued. 3- I perceive fatigue in your voice. 4- I sense fatigue in your voice.
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27 views

sentence construction after preposition, such as "due to", "because of"

Are the following sentences wrong? When I read them, I can't sense any wrong and all the same. Would you mind explaining their reasons if a wrong exists? The official was on leave yesterday owing to ...
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2k views

Can you say "everything is good" as well was "everything is well" [duplicate]

Is it grammatically correct to say "everything is good"? And why is "everything is well" correct? Isn't "well" an adverb? Edit: I'm looking for an answer for this phrase specifically.
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2answers
70 views

What is the adjective/phrase that best describes an inconsistent/irregular weekly earnings pattern?

This is a word- or phrase-request question. Question: What is the pair of adjectives that best describe a [consistent/regular] weekly earnings pattern and an [inconsistent/irregular] weekly ...
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1answer
25 views

possessive form or adjectival noun

I cannot see a pattern or rule that enables me to decide whether I should use possession structure or adjectival noun. election results: No one writes election's results and election is a modifier ...
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1answer
76 views

Wormlike, worm-like or worm like?

How does one write that something is like something else using "like" as a suffix? Possibilities that come to my mind are: X-like Xlike X like Which of these forms are most common? X could be a ...
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1answer
327 views

"Your clothes are small size" --- Is this grammatical?

I am having trouble with this sentence: Your clothes are small size. Would it be correct if I changed it to either: 1) Your clothes are small-sized. (=adjective) 2) Your clothes are small ...
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2answers
637 views

Can "In a timely manner/fashion" describe a noun?

I want to use the phrase "in a timely manner" like this: Such a timely manner answer! It is supposed to function as an adjective that describes the noun "answer", but I find it awkward beside the ...
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1answer
74 views

"That three days ago comment" - when referring to a comment

Is it correct to specify the period of a comment since its insertion when referring to it, like instead of saying: There is a comment that has been submitted three days ago in which it has gained ...