Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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In general, can we subsititute adverbs with 'on a ... basis' when used to modify *some* adjectives?

This question leaped to my mind after reading the definition of basis, especially in this sense: on a … basis the way things are organized or arranged; how often something happens (1). In relation ...
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consuming or consumable

I was wondering which word is correct in the phrase below and why: time- and resource-consuming experimental methods time- and resource-consumable experimental methods
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Always" "usually" "often" "sometimes" "never"

Usually we use words like "always" "usually" "often" "sometimes" "never" in present passive as in "He is always given a surprise" and past ...
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Is there a word for phrases that have an adverb and an adjective starting with same letter in it?

Is there a word for phrases that have an adverb and an adjective starting with same letter in it? Example: Moderately mindful Brilliantly bold Cunningly clever etc.
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Is it correct to say "somebody is integrate'?

In a conversation, it happened to me to say "James is integrate.". I meant he is a man of integrity.". My question is how strange my sentence sounds to a native speaker? and was it ...
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Grammatical Dissection of “it is not completed yet”

Look at the following sentence. It is not completed yet. I think the sentence is in passive voice as the word “completed” is a verb. So, if I add an object in the sentence, it would be: It is not ...
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That is worth (it) to build

That is worth (it) to build Is it optional here? According to Wiktionary, worth it is an adjective synonymous of worthwile.
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separate vs separated

The product is made with two machines that are separate from each other . The product is made with two machines that are separated from each other. I would like to confirm my understanding regarding ...
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"The Willis Tower is taller" or "the Willis Tower is the taller"

I have a question about a sentence with the comparative form of an adjective. When you say "Between A and B, A is better, larger, taller, etc.", should there be an article before the ...
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What does "humbling words" mean?

A colleague of mine wrote: Thank you for the kind and humbling words. I know what's "humble" and what's "to humble someone". I understand here positive intention, but how do you ...
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Are premodifiers included in the scope of the second NP when two NPs are coordinated elliptically?

In the following examples, where the second NP is elliptical, is the premodifier in the first of the coordinated NPs understood to apply to the second NP as well? A welcome change or addition A ...
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Are these phrases adverbs modifying the verb?

Are "in the air" and "at my home" adverbs modifying "was" or adjectives modifying "change" in the sentence below? Change was in the air at my home.
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Order adjectives when using nationalities or geographic names + characteristics

I am a bit confused with the adjectives order when I need to use adjectives that indicate nationality and adjectives that indicate characteristics of an object. Is it, for instance, Indian traditional ...
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Is it actually appropriate to use "unconditional" with words such as love or nothingness? [closed]

At times, I see terms such as unconditional love and unconditional nothing. I'm not a native English speaker so the combination of these terms such as "unconditional" with "love" ...
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Can I say "I scare of dogs" instead of "I am scared of dogs"? [closed]

I have a big problem with this concept. What is different between "I scare of dogs" and "I am scared of dogs" since scare means "to become frightened" Can you help me, ...
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Place of “the same”

Should I use “same” before noun always? Does the meaning change when I use it after noun or why can’t we use it after noun? I mean can I use it after noun ? Like ; I have the same computer as yours ...
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Adverb modifying adjective

There are too many good people to talk to. There are too many same cars as yours. I couldn’t understand what the difference between two structure. In the first sentence I can use “too many” before “...
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What's the difference between 'generic' and 'common'?

The two words both have the meaning that something is of the ordinary kind and not special. There are 2 examples (from Collins dictionary) following: ...generic California apartments, the kind that ...
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I'm looking for a "game girl"

Let's say someone is going to introduce himself to a girl and talk about his tendencies, inclinations and interests. He tends to say: I've always looked for for a girl who is OK with most of the ...
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"A bit" and "a little" can only be used in front of an adjective when the adjective is being used after a verb such as be, but if a noun follows

Page 557 of Collins English Usage reads A bit and a little can only be used in front of an adjective when the adjective is being used after a verb such as be, but not with an adjective that is in ...
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Thirsty vs thirstily

I wandered in the desert thirsty. I thirstily wandered in the desert. Which one is correct to describe “Being thirsty, I wandered in the desert.”?
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Is the prepositional phrase an adjective or adverb?

In the sentence, "Justice Department to announce lawsuit against Texas over law that bans nearly all abortions" are the prepositional phrases "against Texas" and "over law&...
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Blessed are the undefiled in the way [closed]

The word blessed describes what? The undefiled in the way or just the word undefiled? Is the word undefiled used as noun? Why is it in past tense?
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“He is now a happy man” & “he is now a man (who is) happy”

Is there the difference between “he is now a happy man” and “he is now a man (who is) happy”? I think the former means he is happy now but the latter can mean he isn’t happy now but it’s the general ...
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“ What is the different between COVID-19 antibodies that you “ - Is the word different wrong in this sentence?

I read this on redcross.org It says: Q: What is the different between COVID-19 antibodies that you develop from exposure to the virus and antibodies you develop as a reaction to the vaccine? I ...
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Absolutely must or absolutely should?

There's a problem I don't understand why I can't use absolutely should according to the book (Oxford Grammar Intermediate by Swan). Anyway, here's the problem: Put in the best word: must or should ...
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Why is noun+adjective allowed?

I saw this phrase while I was reading an example of the usage of an adjective on Cambridge dictionary online i.e. included. This is the provided link: included. The complete sentence is: The trip ...
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Sentences structure subject+verb+object+adjectives

I read this sentence: You'd boil the kettle dry. Shouldn't there be an adverb to describe the verb boil like dryly? Why has dry been used which is an adjective? Secondly following the same sentence ...
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difference between an adjective phrase and an adverbial phrase

In a web-site, I happen upon a sentence I can’t understand grammatically. Famished from the journey, John decided to hunker down with his horse. They mark that a front part is an adjective phrase. I ...
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A "big" crime or what?

I was wondering what is the most natural adjective to amplify the magnitude of a crime in the following example: There is no freedom of speech and press in that country. If you protest against the ...
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What's the proper adjective associated with Seattle?

I wonder what the proper adjective associated with Seattle is. Wikipedia claims it is Seattlite, however wordsense and Wiktionary just say this is a noun (demonym). An autochthon from Seattle also ...
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Is 'all' an adjective?

In the following sentence, is 'all' an adjective? If yes, then what kind of adjective is it? "She could answer all the questions."
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serrated three stripes mark

Should the boldfaced phrase in the following have been "three-stripe mark" or "three-striped mark"? The toy company's designers have been faithful to the original sneaker, with ...
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Position of "empty" and "full" when used with another adjective

How can I can explain to a learner why we say "an empty blue glass" and not "a blue empty" glass, both adjectives seem to be facts.
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Is the prepositional phrase acting as an adverb or adjective

Is the phrase "after contracting covid-19" acting as an adjective or adverb in the sentence below? Unvaccinated teacher infects students after contracting COVID-19
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Is the prepositional phrase an adverbial or adjective phrase

In the sentence quoted below are the prepositions "for 2021" and "without latest software" acting as an adjective or adverb? "Fossil announces new smartwatches for 2021 ...
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"Too much" before adjectives

You use much too in front of an adjective to say that something cannot be done or achieved because someone or something has too much of a quality. In sentences like these you put much in front of too,...
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It is faraway / far away (from X) to Y

It is faraway / far away (from X) to Y Here, to say how far it is from one place to another, should we use the adjective faraway or the adverb far away?
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Can we swap (adjective+noun) with (noun+adjective)?

I got this sentence below from english app: A fight broke out in the pub and it was hard to pull the people involved apart. I wonder, why isn't involved people? That sounds better to me. And I don't ...
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Do you always need 'the' before superlative adjectives?

Attending a school with over 800 students was her ________ nightmare My answer is the worst, but correct answer (from this website) is worst. I'm not exactly saying that my answer is completely wrong,...
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How do native English people know what is a gradable adjective?

Sphenoid: of, relating to, or being a winged compound bone of the base of the cranium I found out we cannot say “this alien is very sphenoid” (this alien has lots of sphenoid bones). Rainy: marked ...
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Possesive adjective : his/her/its

If for example there is a new person who will come in my team and I don't know if it's a girl or a boy, should I say "his/her or its" qualities are remarkable?
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"Continual" if something undesirable happens or exists without stopping

If you are describing something undesirable which continues to happen or exist without stopping, it is better to use continual rather than continuous. Life for her was a continual struggle because she ...
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The Position of the "Necessary"

It is correct that the "necessary" in bold in the following sentence. If it is skills' adjective, I wonder why it isn't placed before the word of skills? If the "necessary" be ...
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“Sad face,” “sad time,” and “sad friend”

A sad face means a face by which sadness is shown. A sad time means a time when sadness is shown. Then, technically, can a sad friend means a friend by whom sadness is shown? It’s a little bit ...
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Are (I was completely fool) and (I was a complete fool) the same?

I wonder if these two sentences are equivalent: I was completely fool. I was a complete fool. If no, let me know the difference and if they're incorrect, please change the sentence, so I know how ...
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Is it wrong to use -ed adjectives when using Personification or Transferred Epithet?

I know that ….saying “boring house” ✔️ is correct, and …saying “bored house” ❌ is incorrect cause a house cannot have the feeling of boredom. However my point is about personification, when you add a ...
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Is the expression “a bored pencil tapped the school desk" grammatically incorrect? (personification)

I know that saying “boring house” is correct, and saying “bored house” is incorrect because a house cannot have the feeling of boredom. However my point is about personification, when you add a human ...
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Usage of “very cardiac”

I’m trying to describe the disease is related mostly to the heart, and I found the word “cardiac” meaning “relating to the heart.” Can I describe it as “the disease is very cardiac”?
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When should you pluralize an adjectival noun?

When should you pluralize an adjectival noun? I am not sure if both are valid, I think both might be valid, so I am wondering if both are ok or not? So, for example, you may want to say "Apple ...

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