Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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Why we say president Obama or princess Diana but we say Canterbury Cathedral or Marian shrine or Imam Ali mosque?

It always was one of my question that why we say the position of person first and then tell their name but for places or rivers etc, we say the name of the place and then say the quality of it ( for ...
fatemeh khayat's user avatar
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Is the order arrived?

Our teacher keeps telling us that * Is the order arrived? * is grammatically correct and added that Arrived here functions as an adjective. Anyone can help us solve the problem if there is one. Thank ...
Mahir Alhuthali's user avatar
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What is an antonym of -wards?

In words as eastwards and leftwards, -ward or -wards indicates the direction the object moves to. What is an adjective suffix for movement in the direction from? Needless to say, but metaphorical and ...
Frode Alfson Bjørdal's user avatar
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This is a TV show going to be a great hit - correct reduced form?

Example 1 ‎"This is a TV show that is going to be a great hit." Is the reduced form of the above sentence like this? Example 2 "This is a TV show going to be a great hit."
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Should compound nouns treated as singular or plural

All, Which one is correct: "statistical techniques is " or "statistical techniques are" I Googled "statistical techniques is" and also "statistical techniques are&...
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Odd one out–Is “a lush beach” so strange?

The exercise asks [emphasis mine]: Cross out one adjective which does not collocate with the noun   unspoilt / scenic / pebbly / rocky coastline   sandy / pebbly / tropical / rocky / lush beach As ...
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Big and large: why is it not correct to say 'big cappuccino'?

Big and large have similar meanings but in some cases, they are not interchangeable. Is it right that one of such contexts is when speaking about drinks and containers for liquids? For example, a ...
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Bored or a bored person

a. He is bored. b. He is a bored person. Is it correct to use a noun with past participle when used an adjective? For example, The tired singer is not singing a new song. How to use past participle ...
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Should I use an attributive noun or an adjective?

Is there a guideline or rule of thumb to assist in deciding whether to use an adjective or an attributive noun when expressing concepts, as seen in examples like "dental medicine" versus &...
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Identifying coordinate adjectives [duplicate]

Most of the coordinate adjectives fall under the quality/opinion classification. However, we do have many adjective combinations as in the following examples: Big, red apple (or Red, big apple) Tall, ...
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"Pay the full amount" or "pay the whole amount"?

Can you please tell me if I need to use full or whole in the context below? I would like to pay the full amount instead of breaking it down into installments. I would like to pay the whole amount ...
Dmytro O'Hope's user avatar
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Is "more" an adverb or an adjective in "There is nothing more you need to do."

Is "more" an adverb or an adjective in "There is nothing more you need to do." I feel it can be regarded as an adverb as it modifies "you need to do." However, it can ...
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I have heard that my "former" high school teacher is shooting videos and no longer teaches. - is "former" necessary here?

Example 1 I graduated high school 6 years ago. I have heard that my high school teacher is shooting videos and no longer teaches. Example 2 I graduated high school 6 years ago. I have heard that my ...
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The usage of "and" between adjectives

This car is fantastic and old. Did I make any mistake by putting and between these two adjectives since they are from different categories?
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The word "Americans" can't be an adjective, but "Scots" can be. — Why is it so?

We can use "American" as an adjective but not "Americans" because "Americans" is a plural noun. By this logic, we should use "Scot" as an adjective but not &...
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Adjective phrase or adverb phrase

Norma ate in silence. The word 'ate' is a transitive verb that requires an object to clear its meaning. What is the function of the phrase 'in silence' here? Either it's serving as an adjectival ...
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The usage of adjectives [closed]

Please help with this. I love also you. Wrong right? I also love you. Correct right? Also I love you. That's correct too? Do I need a comma after also?
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Use of "emeritus" adjective [closed]

Can I use "emeritus" adjective colloquially (i.e., not necessarily in academia settings)?
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"Born"— Adjective or Verb in this context?

Her brother was born blind. In this context,"Born" is an Adjective or verb? Webster defines it as "Adjective" while OALD defines it as "Verb".
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Meaning of "aphasiac piano"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XXI, published 1892) Passage 326 I stepped toward the window. It was the old familiar room, with the tables set like a Greek P, ...
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How is "make" used when talking about a type of car?

Those are all cars make Chevrolet. Those are all make Chevrolet cars. Those are all Chevrolet make cars. Are any of these syntactically correct English phrases?
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Can we say "I got starving"?

I know we can say "I got hungry/tired/scared/etc." meaning "I became hungry/tired/scared". I was wondering if the following sentence sounds as natural: "I got starving while I ...
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Kind or kindly ways?

When I raised my first questions about the differing uses of culture I was given the impression, in kindly and not so kind ways, that these arose mainly from the fact of an incomplete education. This ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
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"The layer of haze starts out tenuous": why not "tenuously"?

I watched a YouTube video about physics, and the host said the following. Similar to the Earth's atmosphere, the layer of haze starts out very tenuous. If I needed to say something like this, I ...
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Meaning of "elaborate"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XIX, published 1892) Passage 289 The same night I had Nares to dinner. His sunburnt face, his queer and personal strain of talk,...
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Meaning of "judicial emphasis"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVII, published 1892)[1]passage 271 “Yes; I think I understand,” said he. “Suppose I pass you my word that, whatever may have ...
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Using 'powerful' as a noun - "Britain's powerful"

The bane of Britain’s great and powerful is a couple of inches long, has warty skin and a bright orange underbelly—and the power to disrupt some of their most heartfelt ambitions. 'Britain's great ...
SHIN JaeGuk's user avatar
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For to tell the truth is not in itself diplomatic, and to have no care for the result a thing involuntary

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVI, published 1892) Passage 257 Indeed, I believe that was my only reason for entering upon a transaction which was now ...
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The word that describes the feeling when you're disgusted by a certain taste

Imagine that you're having a really sweet and high-fat piece of cake. At first, you can have it just fine, but after a while you get sick of its overwhelming taste. How do I describe that I am now ...
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what type of adjective is "what"?

Consider the sentence, What folly!" identify the adjective in the above sentence What type of adjective is this? According to me, what is the adjective. It looks like an interrogative adjective ...
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Is heavy an adjective of quality or an adjective of quantity

The bus sustained heavy damage in the accident In the above sentence, is heavy an adjective of quality or an adjective of quantity? Adjectives of quantity refer to how many or how much of something ...
lokesh L P's user avatar
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"Best"—adverb or adjective (in the sentence)

The medicine is best taken after meals. I think it's an adverb modifying verb, but it can be an adjective after the copula.
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Does use of superlative adjective affect the order of adjectives?

According to an article about adjective order by Cambridge Dictionary, the following adjective order is correct: a small young man But is the order the same when you make one of the adjectives ...
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Meaning of "That was a home word of Pinkerton's"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XV, published 1892) Passage 232 THE CARGO OF THE “FLYING SCUD.” In my early days I was a man, the most wedded to his idols of ...
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There vs It: 1) <There is> <It is> likely to be heavy snowfall; 2) <There are> <It is> bound to be changes when the new system is introduced

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1a) There is likely to be heavy snowfall. my variant: (1b) It is likely to be heavy snowfall. What is the difference between (1a) and (1b)? oxfordlearnersdictionaries....
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I am a Chinese? [duplicate]

The most rampant and fossilized mistake I've heard from Chinese EFL speakers/learners is "a Chinese" where 'Chinese' was used as a singular noun, for instance, "I am a Chinese". I ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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Why do we say 'aim high' instead of 'aim highly'?

I know we don't say 'aim highly', but I don't know how to exaplain in grammatical terms. Is 'aim high' an idiom? Is 'high' an adverb? If it is, then why can't we say 'aim highly'?
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Meaning of . . . "not one that has any mortal thing to do with Trent"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XIV, published 1892) Passage 224 “Captain,” I said at last, “there is something deuced underhand about this brig. You tell me ...
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The most people/most people

These are correct: Most people agree on this. Most of the people agree on this. This is said to be wrong: The most people agree on this. But I come across "the most people" which are ...
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the more / the less of the two of you

It's OK to say. Who is the taller of the two of you? But how should this issue be treated? Which one of the two of you has the less/the more money? According to the rule, it's correct. But it ...
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Is there any difference between "A + ADJECTIVE + NUMBER + NOUN" and "NUMBER + ADJECTIVE + NOUN"? (e.g. "a full ten bottles" VS "ten full bottles")

Are "A + ADJECTIVE + NUMBER + NOUN" and "NUMBER + ADJECTIVE + NOUN" interchangeable? If not, then what is the difference between them? For example (a-variants are from ...
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Red as noun or adjective

In 'The team whose favorite color is red won the match' is 'RED' used as a noun or an adjective?
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definite article 'the' before a comparative degree of adjective

This was the more remarkable because I was found unable to answer a single question in the Latin paper. Reference: FIRST YEAR AT HARROW by Winston S. Churchill In this sentence, the definite article '...
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Can a linking verb be followed by an adverb?

I read a line in a grammar book "at least the play reads well" in this sentence, the verb "reads" is a linking verb, so shouldn't the right word to use be "good" instead ...
Akshit Raj's user avatar
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What does *monte* mean in the term *three-card-monte* game?

What does monte mean in the term “three-card-monte” game? I have looked up the word in dictionaries but I'm afraid I couldn't find any applicable answer. I was not long set, before my friend returned....
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Incline[d] bench?

While reading about weight lifting, it's common to bump into mentions of incline benches. There's the "incline bench press" exercise, for example, which is a bench press variation used on an ...
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3 free months or 3 months free

Recently my dad and I got into a debate over a Spotify advert which said "Get 3 free months of Spotify Premium". My father said that it was incorrect and should be "3 months on Spotify ...
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Does "I saw a blue car and bus" mean "blue bus" or any coloured bus?

What is the outcome of any and every sentence in the following sentence format when the rules of English grammar is applied upon them. sentence format <Noun Verb Determiner Adjective Noun ...
Stechavy's user avatar
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Worth as a predicate adjective?

I saw the first time 'worth' acting as a predicate adjective here: I do it because it makes me happy. And I now know that I deserve happiness. I deserve love, rest and time for myself. Because I am ...
Lerner Zhang's user avatar
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Why "this" in this case?

Ivan: Could you give me that book on the table over there? Sergio: Do you mean this book here? Ivan: Yes, that book. Sergio: Here you are. Oh, could you give me that magazine too on the table over ...
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