Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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ten minutes free vs free ten minutes?

Are there two both correct? Do you have ten minutes free to discuss research paper? Do you have free ten minutes to discuss research paper? Does "have ten minutes free" means "have ...
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Transforming sentence with "as......as"

So, in Wren and Martin, Excercise 60 a statement was given as "Some boys are at least as good as Karim." which needs to be transformed into comparative and superlative. The solution is given ...
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Can I use "fixed" as antonym of "broken"?

I am wondering to know when something is broken, after repairing, can I say it is fixed or should I say it has been fixed. Can I used fixed as an adjective and antonym of broken?
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I’m looking for words or phrase to describe an office environment where nothing the employee does is ever good enough, it’s pressurizing and toxic?

I work in an office environment where our manager is always finding flaws in our work no matter how well we do. We discuss the situation amongst coworkers and I’m looking for better words to describe ...
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at a rate unparalleled ( question about the position of the adjective)

I got stuck with this sentence 'This is also a period of enormous physical change and adolescents experience changes in their physical development at a rate unparalleled since infancy.'. I am confused ...
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Balanced or Well-balanced

What is the difference between the adjective "balanced" and "well-balanced". For example, "Many families do not realize the importance of a well-balanced diet."
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What does "make it for you special" mean?

This context comes from the second episode of "Game Of Thrones" The conversation happens between a young girl, no more than twelve, and her older friend who brought her a present, which is a ...
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What does this commentator say?

I don't know if this is allowed but I want to know what this Commentator says in this video at 7:18 and 7:21 to be exact. "Slater was (something I do not understand) shoot" and the other one ...
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Can an adjective be a subject

I read a sentence from an authoritative grammar book that adjective can be a subject, but the usage is using the pairs of adjective, for instance, wet or dry will make little difference But later I ...
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the world of the scientific (is this idiomatic?)

the world of the scientific I think the young=young people but can't understnad if 'the + scientific' also makes any meaning right.
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It's more trouble than ... Is it an abbreviation of "of"?

It's more trouble than it's worth. If these sentences have the same structure as "he is a doctor," then "it = trouble" should work. However, in practice, I think it means 'it is ...
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Argentina or Argentine?

In the following extract, should "Argentina" or "Argentine" be used? The images, which show Messi and other Argentina / Argentine players celebrating their 2022 World Cup win, ...
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whichever or whatever

a. They told me to take whichever one I liked. b. They told me to take whatever one I liked. Is there any difference of the meanings of (a) and (b)? Could (b) used instead of c) They told me to take ...
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Can anyone tell me the difference in usage of "dominant" and "domineering"?

What are the various situations where we use the word dominant and domineering? I'm aware that both of these are adjectives (dominant is a noun, too), but, I'm not sure if they both can be used as an ...
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cool as an adjective

When I describe a mountain that has a fairly low temperature, I use the adjective "cool" eg(1) The wilderness has a cool mountain. eg(2) The cool mountain posed a higher risk for the ...
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Difference between adjective, verb and adverb?

How is it that the word "work" can be used as an adjective, verb and an adverb? For e.g: she worked quietly all afternoon In the e.g. 'quietly' is an adverb but 'worked' can be a verb(...
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Is the order of adjectives correct in "a new sleeveless blue woolen jumper"?

Is the order of adjectives in this sentence correct? I've just bought a new sleeveless blue woolen jumper. Which category (perhaps size, shape, or something else) is "sleeveless" in? How ...
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Can adjective(s) be used before the subject?

Can I use an adjective before the subject? Examples: Fast, he is. Tall, I'm. Slow and dumb, they are. Also, is the usage of comma in these sentences correct? Thanks.
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the way you tested me?

Which one is correct ? Why ? is this adjective clause or noun clause ? the way you tested me the way that you tested me the way which you tested me with ?
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Adjectives next to a noun, separated by a comma

Can we add the adjectives of a noun next to it separated by a comma as below in poetry and in general? eg 1: Her hair, long and shiny, blowing in the wind {..} eg 2: Your girl, her hair long and ...
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Use of 'obligatory to' vs 'obligatory for' [closed]

The context is in the late 1800s and early 1900s when there was no organized labor, i.e., brotherhood of workers, or trade unions. Aside from history, if you were an industrialist and your empire was ...
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Is packed an adjective and in an adverb? "The houses were packed in so tightly without streets."

The houses were packed in so tightly without streets. Is packed an ajective and is in an adverb? How about dropping in? The houses were packed so tightly without streets. Is packed and adjective or ...
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"To get stuck" OR "to become stuck": Which one is idiomatic in the case of "a bus on the snowy ground"? [closed]

This sentence is under one of the pictures on the BBC news about the snowfall in England. "Here, two buses become stuck in snow on Muswell Hill in north London." "To become stuck" ...
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whichever of you/whoever of you

a. Whichever student hands in their homework by the end of the week will get a prize. b. Whichever students hand in their homework by the end of the week will get a prize. c. Whichever of you hands in ...
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2 votes
3 answers
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Bloomed as an Adjective

A "thick-trunked tree" means a tree with a thick trunk. Likewise, can we say "fragrant-bloomed tree" to say that the tree gives out fragrant blooms?
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Art tool or artistic tool?

I want to study the usage of language as an artistic/art tool. What word should I choose here? It seems that 'art tool' is somewhat more common, although its meaning is very literal (e.g. art tools ...
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Are "a dog big eyed" and "big eyed dog" valid constructions in English? [closed]

a dog big eyed big eyed dog First: I would like to ask if 1 and 2 are the same in meaning? Second: are they valid constructions? and finally: is "eyed" an adjective?
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Is the phrase "in individuals already anxious" correct in the following sentence?

Is the following sentence correct with the phrase "in individuals already anxious"? I meant to say a negatively perceived event by individuals who are already anxious would give rise to ...
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"As many as 100.000 nurses" vs "Around/about/almost/nearly 100.000 nurses"? Are they the same?

This is from a CNN article: As many as 100,000 members of the Royal College of Nursing will walk out across England, Wales and Northern Ireland on Thursday. When I read the sentence, "as many ...
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Do I need to use the article if I skip the noun in a sentence with an adjective and "or"?

For example: Would you like a smoking or non-smoking table? Would you like a smoking or a non-smoking table?
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SHOULD I USE steady or steadily?

We experienced problems meeting demand and sales fell sharply in November and remained STEADY / STEADILY at 39,000 in December.
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Future delivery

Is there any adjective to describe the situation where the commodities to be delivered in the future.For example Is there any way to make the sentence below simpler by using any adjcetive instead of “ ...
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When should "black and white" use hyphens?

I would like to know what the rule is to hyphen "black and white". In example 1, I am hyphening it because it goes before a noun, whereas, in example 2, I am not hyphening it because there ...
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a French translator [duplicate]

a. He is a French translator. I think that sentence means that he is French and he is a translator. We don't know what language or languages he translates from and what language or languages he ...
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Positive and comparative degree of same adjective [closed]

A little less virtue and I might have lived longer. Reference: THE ANGEL AND THE AUTHOR -AND OTHERS by Jerome K. Jerome As less is a comparative degree of little, it's here being used right after its ...
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What is the difference between using noun as premodifier (of a head noun) and participle as premodifier?

For example, what is the difference between race car vs racing car; cook oil vs cooking oil.
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reduced adjective clause or adverbial?

These are machines that take room air and extract the nitrogen, producing greater than %90 pure oxygen. Is '' producing ''reduced adjective clause or adverbial?
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"feel motivating" or "feel like motivating" or "feel like motivated"?

It can feel motivating if you feel you have the power to adapt your responses in ways that produce the outcomes you want. Why is the form motivating instead of motivated? Is it similar to inspiring ...
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What does "put on " mean in this context?

This context comes from the Woody Allen film "Annie Hall" (Alvy) ... Alvy Singer. I'm a comedian. (ALLISON)- Oh, comedian. Yes. Oh, uh ... you're on next. (ALVY)- What do you mean, next? (...
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Date that is longer or later

He gave me a post-dated cheque with the maturity date 10 days later than I expected. He gave me a post-dated cheque with the maturity date 10 days longer than I expected. Which one should I use to ...
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"(split, divide, separate) sth into adj. and adj.": is it grammatical or just omissive?

The example sentence below is an excerpt from M. A. K. Halliday's Linguistics as Metaphor: [...] each discipline has tended to fragment into separate "branches"; linguistics, apart from its ...
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How correctly to call the following topic?

(1) -Is Rick here? -He is gone. (2) -I am finished with that customer. Who's next? (3) -Where are you? -I am stopped at a red light. Such using "to be + adjective" as in the examples above ...
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What does the adjective "well" mean in this context?

This context comes from the Steven King's novel "The Shining" "Or you take the race track. I go a lot, and I usually do pretty well. I stand by the rail when they go by the starting ...
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What does "yet" mean in this context?

This context comes from the Steven King's novel "The Shining" "-You're asking me all this because you're worried, aren't you? Why are you worried about us? Halloran put his large dark ...
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15 day or 15 days?

Is it grammatically correct to say "Enjoy 15 day free berthing"? As far as I know, 15 day acts as an adjective here, hence is correct. Correct me if am wrong please!
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Are Cheap and rich general opinion adjectives?

He's a rich unfriendly man. He's an unfriendly rich man. I'm confused two sentences above. Can you help me? Which one is correct? Thank you, guys!
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What does "Full practice day" mean?

This context comes from the movie "Five Easy Pieces" BOBBY-What're you doing right now... CATHERINE-Right now I'm going to run a hot tub and soak myself. BOBBY-Then after that? CATHERINE-...
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Why does "new" go before "huge" in: “New huge Japanese company”?

New ‌huge ‌Japanese company. In the sentence above, why does new go before huge? As I know new is a size adjective and huge is an opinion adjective. Therefore, huge has to go before new, but the ...
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Suspects found dead?

Murder suspects found dead. Is dead in this sentence an adjective or an adverb? Why ? Can you explain with examples ?
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The comparison of "lesser than" and "less than" and "smaller than"

I have come across this sentence in a dictionary: "She has little love for him. Certainly, her love for him is lesser than her love for her mother." I wonder if these are also OK "...
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