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Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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Why isn’t “reasonable” used in “The landlords raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and REASONABLY so”?

Could somebody explain me why we use reasonably instead of reasonable: The landlords raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and reasonably so. Quite confuse this grammar.
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He arrived “breathless” at the top of the stairs

I came across this sentence when I looked up the word breathless in OALD: He arrived breathless at the top of the stairs. Why don’t they use breathlessly? I’ve learnt that there are some verbs ...
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Are these adjectives coordinate or cumulative

I'm designing a board game and I've run into an issue regarding a string of adjectives that come up frequently in the game. Sadly, I'm a non-native speaker, so I thought it best to reach out and be ...
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Organisation or organisational skills

Is it more correct or appropriate to say: "I have strong organisation skills" OR "I have strong organisational skills"?
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'Merry of soul', part of a sentence in one of Stevenson's poems: is it grammatically correct and why?

'Merry of soul' I came across that phrase in a song called 'skye boat song', I have also learned that it's a quote from one of Stevenson's poems. I understand that merry is an adjecctive that means ...
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Usage of ''as'' before adjective

Can I use "as" to make adjective into adverb like examples below: 1) I always think as different from other people. 2) I always think differently from other people. Are both sentences have same ...
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Comparison of adjectives [duplicate]

This shirt is the cheaper of the two I wonder why the comparison is cheaper and not cheapest. Aren't the sentence is referring to more than two items and so it should use -est? And cheaper will be ...
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business family or business class family

I know that there is no adjective form for business, if I wanted to say that I live in a family whose traditional job is business. which of the following sentence would be correct? 1- I was born and ...
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“so” or “such” to replace a preceding adjective

I'd like to know whether "so" or "such" is correct in the following: Those actors were not hired because they all looked indistinct or were regarded as such. Those actors were not hired ...
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How come “tales” can get 'taller' as in “his tales are getting taller”?

“You are merely repeating the names of those who were acquitted of being Death Eaters thirteen years ago!” said Fudge angrily. “You could have found those names in old reports of the trials! For ...
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adjective meaning:“free” airtime?

The Oxford Advanced Learner's Dictionary gives the following definition of airtime: the amount of time that is paid for when you are using a cell phone And it goes on to give the following example:...
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What does “more happy than surprised” mean, and why not use “happier than”?

Please tell me why people use comparative in this sentence. It is very strange to me. The parents were more happy than surprised at the study result of their son. Why don't they use "happier than ...
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What adjectives should be used in this sentence? [closed]

The population of Cairo had become too ____. Which answer is correct? Large, small, big, wide. I say too large but not sure.
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Difference between arabic , arab and arabian

Which one is correct to describe a photographer who lives in an arabic country ? (arabic photographer) Or (arab photographer ) Or (Arabian photographer) And what are the differences
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Irregular Adjectives without “than” [closed]

Somewhere I read and English grammar e.g. some comparative adjectives have lost their comparative meanings and used without "than" as positives;as: former, latter, elder, upper, inner, outer, utter. ...
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“The dangerous of” vs. “The danger of “

Can an adjective be followed by of that regarded as possessive but not the one that is a part of adjective. 1) Do you know the dangerous of smoking cigarettes? Usually I read always such ...
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Can I say “something another”?

In the following example sentence: You must choose something else. Can I say it with the following: You must choose something another. I was told that something another is not correct, but not ...
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Difference between 'humid' and 'muggy' [closed]

Could you let me know the difference between these two adjectives? In my book they seem to be slightly different(by it's not clearly explained) while on the internet most people say that they've the ...
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When an adjective is placed right after a noun it's modifying

When an adjective is placed right after a noun it's modifying without a comma between both, can it be thought to be functioning as a "restrictive modifier" as in "the attorney general", "a lion ...
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Adjective + noun + noun + noun

In the phrase "appropriate substance use information", what noun does appropriate modify? I'm guessing it is information, is that correct? Is this a general rule? How would you go about modifying ...
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Use of *Increased* as an Adjective.

Is increased here used as an adjective like "window is broken"? a) My salary is not increased. b) Prices are increased. c) Profit for this month is increased. I am aware that increased is ...
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1answer
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“Gathering evidence” vs. “Evidence-gathering”

I want to know, if there is any, the difference between the following sentences: 1) He was responsible for gathering evidence. gathering evidence And 2) He was responsible for ...
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Do “The worstest” exist in english?

I am wondering if the word "the worstest" exists in English? It seems like people sometimes use it.I have never found it in my English grammar book. I am trying to find if it is a common mistake or ...
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… needs restricted firearm

The Chief Firearms Officer is interpreting “needs” in the Firearms Regulation two different ways for their own uses. The same word “needs” is used in the identical passage, except for what the bearer’...
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Can I use the word 'subsequent' like this?

Is it correct to say? achieve something by extending something and subsequent finding something I've search the internet, but I couldn't find an example of subsequent + gerund. The whole ...
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would be/ was/ were - differences [duplicate]

1.Around midnight, as we left the previous year behind and moved into the new year, my mom would be busy cooking for the guests. I didn't like crowds so I stayed in the living room watching the telly. ...
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Concrete evidence vs. obvious evidence

Which of these two words -- concrete and obvious -- can we use in this sentence, or are they both possible? "The Moon's surface shows _________ evidence of having been affected by impact cratering,...
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Are the suffixes -al and -ar the same adjective suffixes? if not why? [closed]

This picture is about specific examples of these two suffixes.
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Several instances of the same object with different adjectives: singular or plural?

Should I say I've got a red, a blue and a yellow balloons. or I've got a red, a blue and a yellow balloon. ?
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Velocity- and displacement-proportional forces

I have troubles building compound adjectives and enumerating them. In my field (mechanics) we deal with forces which are proportional to displacement or velocity. We tend to call them "displacement ...
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“ate an animal raw” or “ate a raw animal”

To Kill a Mockingbird “if you ate an animal raw, you could never wash the blood off.” I want to know the difference between I ate a raw animal ... and I ate an animal raw.
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Make something higher

Can I say :” make something five meters higher “ or “ make something higher by five meters “ ? I mean Can I use “ five meters “ in these ways ?
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As+ adjective + as (comparing the subject with itself)

In the sentence, "When one considers the many ways by which organisms are completely destroyed after death, it is remarkable that fossils are as common as they are.", what is referred to by the word "...
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Old, rusty, electric fan or old rusty electric fan (adjective)

When you are writing this electric fan description... Old, rusty, electric fan. Or Old rusty electric fan. Which is correct? Do I have to always use sentence1 in every situation? I find that ...
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“Black skin” Vs. “Black-skinned” Vs. “with black skin”? [closed]

Are all these expressions correct? 1) A person with black skin 2) A black-skinned person 3) A black skin person 4) A person skinned with black 5) A person skinned black 6) A person of black skin
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On the correct usage of “as is”

I have a sentence like: We find 3 common strings as is. What I mean in the sentence is that I find 3 common strings between two files appear as is. Shall I use "as-is" or as is?
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Why does “common” come after “diseases” in “diseases common among older people”?

I have a question about below sentence: Diseases common among older people my problem is why "common" which is an adjective in this sentence has come after the subject "diseases"? Thanking in ...
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Can “drink” and “eat” take object complements?

I want to drink the coffee cold. I don't want to eat the soup cold. Quite a lot of times I've come across such a sentence in which people wrote "drink it cold" or "eat it cold", but I have no ...
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Bone-rattling vs. bumpy

As an ESL, I only know that when the road your travelling on is rough, I describe it as "bumpy". Road in provinces is usually bumpy. Compared to: Road in provinces is usually bone-rattling. Is ...
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if Quick means “moving fast”, why Car is quick does not work? [closed]

I have always learned that quick relates to more to time (a quick break) and fast relates more to physical speed. However, Oxford and Cambridge dictionaries state that Quick: Moving fast or doing ...
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Is the word “dairy” in “dairy farmer” being used as a noun or adjective?

Is the word "dairy" in "dairy farmer" being used as a noun or adjective?
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Is LESS is a Adjective or Adverb in the particular context

You are paying less attention to your studies than you used to do. What is “less” in this sentence? A. Noun B. Verb C. Adverb D. Adjective I was studying English mcqs at a particular website which ...
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A (Director's name) movie - why not possessive?

I have just watched a movie and noticed, during the opening credits: A James Cameron movie Why it is not "James Cameron's movie" when it actually is his film (in a sense that he directed it). Why ...
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Which adjective word can I use for describing the network can not pass data?

If have two networking devices using a link connected them, but the networking between them can not switch data to each other. I mean the physical is connected, but they do not meet the protocol so ...
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Which one is right? “person guilty” vs “guilty person”?

In the book of "1100 Words You Need to Know", about "felon" word, the following definition was presented: "person guilty of a major crime" I am wondering the following one should be right: "...
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Which part of speech is “left” in this sentence?

I've always thought (perhaps, erroneously) that if there is some ambiguity in determining whether the given word is an adjective or a past participle, you need to look at whether the "source" of ...
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Can a blunder be egregious?

A blunder is by definition already a serious mistake, can we use an egregious blunder implying an extremely bad error? The context:
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Using pp after a name as an adjective

If I want to mention the condition in which something, for example the light, is exposed to something else like the wind and I am exposed to the first thing (the light), can I say: I am exposed to ...
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Use of enough with Noun

Carrying to term a pregnancy against one's will is punishment enough -- in fact, it can amount to torture, according to the United Nations Human Right Council. I found the above sentence in New York ...
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Is there difference in meaning between these three sentences?

Is there difference in meaning between these three sentences? He was working less hard than it's usual. He was working less hard than usual. He was working less hard than usually.