Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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I had a question about the meaning of 'bare' in a context

could someone tell me that what is the meaning of the word 'bare' and the phrasal verb 'divide over' in this sentence please? Here's the sentence: "Biden lays bare Nato divide over Russian ...
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that running boy

a. Stop that running boy! b. Stop that boy running! You see a young boy running towards a street and you think he is going to try and cross it and put his life in danger. You shout to other people to ...
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native English speakers

a. Native speaker men speak English differently than native speaker women. b. Native speaking men speak English differently than native speaking women. ========================== c. Native English ...
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the dog's barking/the dog barking

a. The dog barking was coming from the house next door. b. The dog's barking was coming from the house next door. It seems to me that in (a) the dog is coming from the house next door while in (b) ...
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similarity or difference between on and in

Last week my friend asked me if I found the information that he asked me to find. And I said yes. He asked how did I find about it. I said i found the information in my computer, and he said that, I ...
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Does "any" change to "some" in reported speech?

This sentence appeared in a reported speech exercise assigned to me. "Are there any oranges in the fridge?", she asked her mom. This is the exercise's key — it changed "any" to &...
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What part of speech is (red)?

Is the word (red) in this sentence an adjective modifying the noun (leaves) Or (red) is a common noun functions as an object complement. ? Pigments turn the leaves red.
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"They are more convenient and reliable." vs "They are more convenient, and reliable."

They are more convenient and reliable. They are more convenient, and reliable. <--- [I'm not sure that this sentence is natural.] Am I right that in the first sentence the adjective is "more ...
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Does "to show" function as an adverb modifying an adjective in this sentence? [closed]

Does the usage of the infinitive to show serve the purpose the task below? Task: write a sentence using the infinitive "to show" as an adverb modifying an adjective. I tried to use "to ...
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Help me with be + adj/ verb grammar in the below sentences

I know how to use passive grammar but here I'm confused with the use of be + adj. Is there any differences in the meaning of below sentences? You can cook cauliflower until it is soft. (is + adj) ...
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How to use participles in front of a noun with object for the participle?

I know that a participle following a noun can have an object. As like, The boy throwing a ball Mother goose followed by the baby gooses However, how can we use participles in front of the noun with ...
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Does "Yet-not-something" exist? [closed]

I was writing a text and started thinking if this grammar construction exists: "yet-not-something". The phrase I was trying to write is: It is expected the operations start by May and, by ...
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have available something

We have plenty of office space available. (from Oxford learner's dictionaries) In the above sentence, what is the grammatical role of 'available'? 1)a modifier that is included in the NounPhrase ...
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Do "spare bedroom" and "extra bedroom" mean the same thing?

a. extra bedroom b. spare bedroom Is there any difference in the meanings?
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Finding the correct word for something which is optional and can be empty

I was actually writing a program but couldn't find the suitable word I write Breakable for something that can be broken Nullable --> Something that can be null Callable --> Someone who ...
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When asking if someone agrees or not with one word, do you say "agreed" or "agree"?

I've watched a few televised court cases. I distinctly hear the lawyers, when examining the witnesses, say with one word "agreed" and not "agree"? Which is correct and why?
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"Be everywhere" V "Be available everywhere"

When referring to a feature request in software to make a particular functionality easily reachable in the UI, which statement is more correct between: This feature should be available everywhere in ...
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Can an adjective precede a determiner? [closed]

Start browsing our collection of officially licensed the Beatles merchandise. For my job, I am required to write about various types of products. Recently, while I was writing about band merchandise, ...
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What does "hyper-functional" mean in the following context?

Two tales are often told about Japan. The first is of a nation in decline, with a shrinking and ageing population, sapped of its vitality. The second is of an alluring, hyper-functional, somewhat ...
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Can "current" on its own be used as a heading, in the sense 'going on'?

I'm translating a webpage, containing a section with news, upcoming events etc. In the original, this section is headed by a single word meaning 'current'. On other webpages like this one this heading ...
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We say "super chill", so is it valid if I say "super mature"? [closed]

We say "super chill", so is it valid and if so, why, and can I say "super mature" or "super conscious" or "super popular" ?
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Resultative adjectives

Couples shouldn’t go to bed offended against each other. Larry washed the car clean. He Printed the photo very small. Today I tried to understand “resultative adjectives”, but they confused me. As ...
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Should we use possession or can we consider nouns as adjectives?

I very often come across different words which I need to use as nouns or as adjectives. For some words I can look up in a dictionary whether they can be an adjectives or not. But many of them are not ...
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the then new robots [duplicate]

a. They used then-new robots. b. They used the then-new robots. Are both sentences grammatically correct? I think they are, but there is a difference in their meanings. To me, (a) means that they used ...
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Compound adjectives with articles or not?

Which one is correct? A half-a-liter lemonade bottle A half-liter lemonade bottle Is it true that 1 is wrong?
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Using different infinitive forms for the "unreal past" and "future"

I assume these three sentences below have the same meaning. Only the first one conveys the message that the action of sitting happens for a longer period. Am I right? I'd like to have been sitting ...
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Use of comma in reduced adjective/relative clause

My first question is whether 1) The students who were well-organized passed the exam == 2) [reduced adjective clause] The students, being well-organized, passed the exam. If yes, my second ...
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How often is fine used to describe a good person during greetings?

It is very common to be greeted with a question about being 'fine'. For example, "are you fine" today? How are you? Are you alright? Are you okay? These example questions all ask about being ...
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'Writing': is it a gerund (noun) or present participle (adjective) in this sentence? [duplicate]

What is 'writing' in these two sentences, a gerund or present participle (adjective): 1) "This is my writing table" and 2) "I bought a writing table"?
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Two spellings of SEPARATE? Desperately Seeking Closure!

I am utterly convinced that I was taught two spellings of the word 'separate' The first version, separate describes something in a different location. The second was SEPERATE, a verb describing the ...
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Is it good to end a sentence with several adjectives without noun?

Are "brilliant" & "white" both adjectives (in this case), or not? Is it good to end a sentence with several adjectives when noun is absent? Is it used only in informal English, ...
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Twice more than

I read the reports twice more than you. I read twice more reports than you. I thought there are difference between two sentences. The first one means the number of the reports is twice more than the ...
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Comparative without "than", or with "as opposed to" instead of "than"

Can we use a comparative without "than", or substitute "as opposed to" for "than" in the following sentence: Beef is tastier as opposed to game meat. Is the sentence ...
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What is the function of the word 'possible' in this clause?

This is where most people are impeded from being an iconoclast. For example, when confronted with information streaming from the eyes, the brain will interpret this information in the quickest way ...
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likely for someone to V

Are the following uses of "likely for" okay? If one is okay but the other is not, please explain why: a. There are some things you can do to make it more likely for you to catch their ...
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Adjectives made of nouns

Can you show me the logic which is behind this: 1 He is a six-year-old boy. - correct 2 I hate the eight-hours-a-day office routine. - correct But why not "eight-hour-a-day"? What about ...
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Requirement VS Requisite

Could anyone please let me know how the following examples differ in meaning? Money is a requirement for life. Money is a requisite for life. Requirement: something that you must do, or something ...
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Someone who deceives people out of their possessions / money

As everyone knows, unfortunately, there are many types of people in the world who try to get your money or possess your belongings (your home, car, bank accounts information, etc.) a salesman who is ...
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Does "I am married/engaged" depicts status or action/happening?

I know that "I got married/engaged" means "I was married/engaged" as in action/happening instead of status and " I am married/engaged depicts the status but can "I am ...
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Is "the" an adverb or an adjective?

I read an article that states that the definite article "the" is an adjective before nouns the ball and is an adverb before superlative adjectives the best player What is its type (part ...
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Expressing comparison in English

Can you please explain this structure in the field of comparison and adjectives? X times as adjective as something Example: Astronomers have seen a handful of stars that put out flares of gamma and x-...
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more with a comparative degree

We use 'more' when we use the second degree of the words with multiple syllable such as "beautiful" becomes "more beautiful". We don't use 'more' with words like rich and hard. We ...
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Active Vs Proactive

As you can see in my provided dictionary definitions, there is hardly a definite distinction between the two adjectives at least here in my case. I was wondering how these two differ semantically and ...
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Subtle meaning difference in usage of adverb vs adjective in here

our current vague knowledge our currently vague knowledge As far as I know the two above phrases are grammatically correct. In the first one both adjectives "current" and "vague" ...
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Should the adjective "problem" not be used before a noun?

According to the Merriam-Webster's dictionary, the word "problem" is defined as an adjective as follows: problem adjective Usage: always used before a noun :difficult to deal with a ...
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In general, can we subsititute adverbs with 'on a ... basis' when used to modify *some* adjectives?

This question leaped to my mind after reading the definition of basis, especially in this sense: on a … basis the way things are organized or arranged; how often something happens (1). In relation ...
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consuming or consumable

I was wondering which word is correct in the phrase below and why: time- and resource-consuming experimental methods time- and resource-consumable experimental methods
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Always" "usually" "often" "sometimes" "never"

Usually we use words like "always" "usually" "often" "sometimes" "never" in present passive as in "He is always given a surprise" and past ...
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Is there a word for phrases that have an adverb and an adjective starting with same letter in it?

Is there a word for phrases that have an adverb and an adjective starting with same letter in it? Example: Moderately mindful Brilliantly bold Cunningly clever etc.
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Is it correct to say "somebody is integrate'?

In a conversation, it happened to me to say "James is integrate.". I meant he is a man of integrity.". My question is how strange my sentence sounds to a native speaker? and was it ...

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