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Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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"being" with different types of adjectives

I divide adjectives into so called ordinary ones such as: nice, famous, big. Second category is adjectives with "ed ending" or the ones which are the same as the third form of a verb like: ...
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More than one adjective for a noun separated by comma

I am of the notion that when you mention more than one adjective for a noun, you separate them with commas and finally an and before the last one. #1 eg: the evening, gloomy, rainy and cold. If there ...
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Adjective placement - why do I sometimes see "meat raw" instead of "raw meat"? [closed]

What's the meaning of "meat raw". For example: You should not eat meat raw. Why not "raw meat"?
Elham Khodami's user avatar
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Can we say “in upheaval times” instead of “in times of upheaval”?

A native English speaker told me rhat I should say “in times of upheaval” instead of “in upheaval times”. Now that confused me since I know that nouns can act as adjectives such as door-key, fire ...
Asim's user avatar
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How should I understand the following italic and bold part?

In this following context, how should I take this italic and bold part? Is something (like 'that is') omitted between the words 'Magadh'i and 'proper'? ' What is this part's simple form? Could you ...
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Is it posible to intensify an adjective + noun using "so" or "very"?

I was wondering if it is possible to intensify an adjective plus a noun using the common intensifiers for adjectives only such as "very" or "so". According to grammar, if ...
PROCESIONES CELESTES's user avatar
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2 answers
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High or tall car and desk and screen?

With which adjective is it natural to use the words screen, car/vehicle, table. I already know that when something is high off the ground, it has great distance between itself and the ground. Tall is ...
K945's user avatar
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Difference between conflicted and ambivalent?

I have been racking my brain and consulting several dictionaries to tease out the difference but these two adjectives are too similar both in terms of definition and use. Here are the defitinitons ...
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Alone as an adverb or as an adjective

Alone, thought Bittering. Does the word 'alone' describe Bittering as an adjective or his action of thinking as an adverb? Does the sentence mean that Bittering thought that he was alone or it means ...
Abid's user avatar
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Adjective for someone that refuses help from others?

I have spent an embarrassing amount of time searching for an answer to this question with no results. I am looking for an adjective that describes someone that refuses to accept help from others. I ...
King of the Hounds's user avatar
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“Only vs itself” which one should I use?

Should I use "itself" or "only" when I say I don't have something. Example: a. itself: I don't have insta ID itself b. only: I don't have insta ID only
Yaalan appa's user avatar
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"A purple bander copy"

(From A Terrible Kindness by Jo Browning Wroe, Part II Cambridge Choir, chapter 19) (in the classroom; Mr Shrubs, the teacher; William and Martin, choristers at King's College, Cambridge) It took a ...
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Which form is more natural? early or earlier

I'm a English learner form Japan. I hope someone helps me out about "early or earlier". You should have got up early. You should have got up earlier. Can we say both or not? Which sentence ...
Yuki's user avatar
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If we can say "roomy jackets", can we say "a roomy shirt"?

collinsdictionary.com: If you describe a piece of clothing as roomy, you mean that you like it because it is large and fits loosely: roomy jackets On hinative.com two American English speakers said &...
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Difference between "reliable witness / source / data / information" and "dependable witness / source / data / information"

"Reliable" on britannica.com has two meanings: able to be trusted to do or provide what is needed; able to be depended on: ... able to be believed; likely to be true or correct: (1a) a ...
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1) Can "solid" mean "considerable/substantial"?— "solid money/success/age"— 2) Can "solid" mean "imposing/important-looking"?— "solid appearance/man" [closed]

I looked up the word "solid" but I still have some questions about it. (all sentences below are mine) Can the word "solid" be used in the meaning of "considerable, ...
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Why add the word "solid" to the verb "freeze"? E.g., "The clothes froze solid on the washing line." Does the meaning change if we remove "solid"?

I'm interested in how the adjective "solid" affects the verb "freeze"? For this purpose, I found some examples. oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1a) The clothes froze solid on the ...
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What does the word "solid" mean in the context of detective work when talking about an aspect of a crime

This context comes from the movie "The Game" 1997 (No spoilers) It's a situation in which someone hired a detective to investigate an elaborate prank being played on the client. The ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
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What does "sweeping classical music" mean?

I'm watching the Johny Depp/Amber Heard trial documentary on Netflix and there is a musical composition worked into the footage of a cityscape when a narrator talks about the penthouses he owned and ...
Static Bounce's user avatar
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Right usage of 'large' ("The windows in the front room are 10 m × 12 m large")

Is it correct to say 'this is x cm large'? For example, is it O.K to say The windows in the front room are 10 m × 12 m large.
Shawn Reagan's user avatar
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This or that in this context?

I am coming to Belgium next week ,I arrive on Monday . Will your shop be open on Thursday 25th April or are you going to a record fair this day ? Can I use this day instead of that day to emphasize ...
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Half my money is invested in property

Half my money is invested in property. Can sentence 1 have two meanings, (a) or (b) below, depending on context? a) the money is currently invested in property. Here, "invested" acts as an ...
Mr. X's user avatar
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Get or Have Something Done with Past Participle Verb (Participle Adjective or Passive Voice)

I am a bit confused. Here are my examples: I get my home cleaned every other week. I'm having my office painted. They had their toilet fixed. Am I correct to think that my past participle verbs are ...
Alexander Jorgensen's user avatar
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My friend told me that he had a really long talk with his girlfriend yesterday at her home, which traumatized him - modifying scope

Example 1 ‎"My friend told me that he had a really long talk with his girlfriend yesterday at her home, which traumatized him and drained all of his energy." Is this correct English? My ...
VinceL's user avatar
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2 votes
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Are commas needed in “a small white oblong helicopter”?

I'm having trouble deciding whether these are cumulative or coordinate adjectives. There's nothing unusual to note about the context. The writer is describing a helicopter that looks a bit different ...
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Compound adjective -ed vs. -ing suffix

I find some compound adjectives has a -ed suffix, e.g., red-haired, cold-blooded, two-faced, open-minded, light-hearted, etc. In comparison, there are also ones with -ing suffix, such as good-looking, ...
oeter's user avatar
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1 answer
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Where to add the adjective, before or after the noun?

We usually put the adjective before the noun, as in "a big apple". How about this case? I ate a bigger apple than Tom's. I ate an apple bigger than Tom's. Are they both grammatically ...
kuwabara's user avatar
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Why we say president Obama or princess Diana but we say Canterbury Cathedral or Marian shrine or Imam Ali mosque?

It always was one of my question that why we say the position of person first and then tell their name but for places or rivers etc, we say the name of the place and then say the quality of it ( for ...
fatemeh khayat's user avatar
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Is the order arrived?

Our teacher keeps telling us that * Is the order arrived? * is grammatically correct and added that Arrived here functions as an adjective. Anyone can help us solve the problem if there is one. Thank ...
Mahir Alhuthali's user avatar
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1 answer
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What is an antonym of -wards?

In words as eastwards and leftwards, -ward or -wards indicates the direction the object moves to. What is an adjective suffix for movement in the direction from? Needless to say, but metaphorical and ...
Frode Alfson Bjørdal's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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This is a TV show going to be a great hit - correct reduced form?

Example 1 ‎"This is a TV show that is going to be a great hit." Is the reduced form of the above sentence like this? Example 2 "This is a TV show going to be a great hit."
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Should compound nouns treated as singular or plural

All, Which one is correct: "statistical techniques is " or "statistical techniques are" I Googled "statistical techniques is" and also "statistical techniques are&...
Kernel's user avatar
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Odd one out–Is “a lush beach” so strange?

The exercise asks [emphasis mine]: Cross out one adjective which does not collocate with the noun   unspoilt / scenic / pebbly / rocky coastline   sandy / pebbly / tropical / rocky / lush beach As ...
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Big and large: why is it not correct to say 'big cappuccino'?

Big and large have similar meanings but in some cases, they are not interchangeable. Is it right that one of such contexts is when speaking about drinks and containers for liquids? For example, a ...
Aer's user avatar
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Bored or a bored person

a. He is bored. b. He is a bored person. Is it correct to use a noun with past participle when used an adjective? For example, The tired singer is not singing a new song. How to use past participle ...
Abid's user avatar
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Should I use an attributive noun or an adjective?

Is there a guideline or rule of thumb to assist in deciding whether to use an adjective or an attributive noun when expressing concepts, as seen in examples like "dental medicine" versus &...
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Identifying coordinate adjectives [duplicate]

Most of the coordinate adjectives fall under the quality/opinion classification. However, we do have many adjective combinations as in the following examples: Big, red apple (or Red, big apple) Tall, ...
BumbleBee's user avatar
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"Pay the full amount" or "pay the whole amount"?

Can you please tell me if I need to use full or whole in the context below? I would like to pay the full amount instead of breaking it down into installments. I would like to pay the whole amount ...
Dmytro O'Hope's user avatar
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0 answers
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Is "more" an adverb or an adjective in "There is nothing more you need to do."

Is "more" an adverb or an adjective in "There is nothing more you need to do." I feel it can be regarded as an adverb as it modifies "you need to do." However, it can ...
Kevin.J's user avatar
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6 votes
3 answers
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I have heard that my "former" high school teacher is shooting videos and no longer teaches. - is "former" necessary here?

Example 1 I graduated high school 6 years ago. I have heard that my high school teacher is shooting videos and no longer teaches. Example 2 I graduated high school 6 years ago. I have heard that my ...
VinceL's user avatar
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2 votes
2 answers
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The usage of "and" between adjectives

This car is fantastic and old. Did I make any mistake by putting and between these two adjectives since they are from different categories?
train bee 282's user avatar
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The word "Americans" can't be an adjective, but "Scots" can be. — Why is it so?

We can use "American" as an adjective but not "Americans" because "Americans" is a plural noun. By this logic, we should use "Scot" as an adjective but not &...
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Adjective phrase or adverb phrase

Norma ate in silence. The word 'ate' is a transitive verb that requires an object to clear its meaning. What is the function of the phrase 'in silence' here? Either it's serving as an adjectival ...
Abid's user avatar
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The usage of adjectives [closed]

Please help with this. I love also you. Wrong right? I also love you. Correct right? Also I love you. That's correct too? Do I need a comma after also?
train bee 282's user avatar
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1 answer
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Use of "emeritus" adjective [closed]

Can I use "emeritus" adjective colloquially (i.e., not necessarily in academia settings)?
t f's user avatar
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"Born"— Adjective or Verb in this context?

Her brother was born blind. In this context,"Born" is an Adjective or verb? Webster defines it as "Adjective" while OALD defines it as "Verb".
Sam's user avatar
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Meaning of "aphasiac piano"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XXI, published 1892) Passage 326 I stepped toward the window. It was the old familiar room, with the tables set like a Greek P, ...
philphil's user avatar
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How is "make" used when talking about a type of car?

Those are all cars make Chevrolet. Those are all make Chevrolet cars. Those are all Chevrolet make cars. Are any of these syntactically correct English phrases?
cherry-noize's user avatar
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Can we say "I got starving"?

I know we can say "I got hungry/tired/scared/etc." meaning "I became hungry/tired/scared". I was wondering if the following sentence sounds as natural: "I got starving while I ...
Dmytro Grabovskyi's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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Kind or kindly ways?

When I raised my first questions about the differing uses of culture I was given the impression, in kindly and not so kind ways, that these arose mainly from the fact of an incomplete education. This ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar

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