Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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Why isn't 'half' an adjective in this sentence?

The following example is from Cambridge dictionary: A: Want some sugar in your coffee? B: Only half a spoon, please They categorise 'only' as an adverb phrase, which I agree with; however, they ...
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Gerunds or adjective clauses

Can someone explain this to me? I am confused by these gerund or adjective clauses. Lionel messi attending the party. Dolphins jumping at marineland in California. Mafia selling drugs. Bertrand ...
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Could you tell me the pronunciation of "a learned behavior"? [closed]

a learned behavior How do you pronoun the 'learned' in the sentence?
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Is it okay to omit the first "as" in "as adj. as" in informal speech?

I think I sometimes hear sentences like "Much as I think ..." or "Soon as he ...". I'm not certain, but when the "as adj. as" form comes at the beginning of the sentence, ...
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Adjective from "Problem Solving Independently" [closed]

I need to know whether there's an adjective that could represent this sentence "I will help you to problem-solving independently." I hope that the answer could be similar to word like "...
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compound adjectives with "-made"

Can compound adjectives ending in -made denote something that is made of or from a material? For example, is "seaweed-made packaging" okay?
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Does the adjective honey-tongued carry a positive meaning

I know honey-tongued can be used to describe a person such as businessman or a politician who is not sincere and persuasive trying to lobby ideas. Can it also be used to describe people who are good ...
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How does 'nominally' an adverb rather than an adjective?

My question regards the following sentences The province is nominally independent. While nominally a film student, Barnett had no aspirations of a career behind the camera. Although 75 per cent of ...
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adjective order: a pink patterned shirt

I have a question concerning adjective order in English. As far as I know the adjective order goes this way: number, opinion, value, size, age, shape, weight, color, origin, material, and purpose How ...
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using real instead of really

I sometimes hear YouTubers say "something is real good" is it okay to use real instead of really? can I say "I am real proud of you?"
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Adjectives and ambiguity in meaning

Read the following sentence: The lazy people of our family like this car. Does the word "lazy" in the phrase "the lazy people of our house" only refer to the group of people that ...
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Why these adjectives comes after the noun, is this case?

The Headline: "ee the Read Like the Wind Newsletter Our critic’s latest recommendations for books old and new include “Pigeon” and “The Odyssey.” why "old" and "new" after ...
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How to understand the world "plain"?

Rough and gray as rock, I'm plain as plain can be. But hidden deep inside there's great beauty in me. What am I? What does "I'm plain as plain can be" mean? Does it mean the first plain is ...
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a good game for them to lose

I was thinking about the structure 'adjective+noun+for+noun+infinitive' and was wondering whether the structure itself could be used in two ways. Consider the following sentences: a. This is a good ...
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What is a common adjective that expresses a child who excessively tells on his friends to his parents for trivial things?

Bob got pushed by his friends, not a big push. Maybe, his friends were just teasing him. Bob, then, told on his friends to his parents. In another situation, Bob's friends then kidded him in a funny ...
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Order of adjectives plus commas [closed]

What is the proper order and use of commas in this sentence and how strict is it? I feel this is correct, but want to hear from other native speakers since English is complicated and sometimes ...
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"-style" and "-like" in compound adjectives

To describe something that looks similar to something else, English provides us style and like words to create compound adjectives. For example: Elvis–Presley-style dance Elvis–Presley-like dance Or:...
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Making a compound adjective using "mundane" and "oriented"

In compound modifiers, we sometimes use nouns instead of adjectives, however, I do not know which one is the correct choice in the sentences below: However, one can claim that such an inspiration, in ...
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In this use of 'far-ranging theorist', does 'far-ranging' mean 'of great influence', 'of a theory of broad scope', or both?

Searching through the definitions given by dictionaries, I was not able to decide between the meanings. The complete sentence is "The most original and far-ranging theorist of his generation, ...
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Invasive (adjective)

A native British teacher shared this; Invasive: (especially of an action or sensation) tending to intrude on a person's thoughts or privacy "Our neighbour is so invasive, he's constantly looking ...
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The type of a grave

What would this sort of grave be called which is not earth-pit now? What adjective will best describe it? A. Constructed grave B. Built grave C. Plastered grave D. Masonry-built grave E. Structured ...
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Adjective: doctrinal

There are different kinds of adjectives i.e. attributive, predicative, etc. We sometimes use some adjectives for people but some aren't used in such a way. What about the adjective 'doctrinal'? We can ...
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'He walked off embarrassed and sad'

He walked off embarrassed and sad. (I can't remember where I found this sentence as I then just noted it without citing the source to ask later). 'Embarrassed' and 'sad' are functioning as Subjective ...
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is 'rolling' participle or adjective? [closed]

A rolling stone gathers no moss Here is "rolling" an adjective or a present participle? If it is both, which one is more accurate? If you have to choose one, which one would you choose? ...
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What's the right adjective to use when referring to someone in their infancy?

What's the right adjective to use when referring to someone in their infancy? Suppose I've just watched a video recording of something Jack did when he was a newborn. Which adjective should I use in ...
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Is good-sounding a valid adjective?

I'm a high school student from China. My English teacher likes to use adjectives like "good-sounding, nice-looking" etc. like this: "This is a nice-looking hat", "This is a ...
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Can I call a door to the left 'left door'?

Can I call a door to the left 'left door'? The word left is also an adjective, and it doesn't sound wrong to me, but I wanted to make sure. Let's say I'm in a room, and there's a door to my left and ...
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"Dark, straight hair" and "Curly gray hair"

My book says "dark, straight hair" and "curly gray hair" are ways to describe physical appearance. I've seen there's an order of adjectives people usually follow and I wonder why ...
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Can i say "Tree is fallen" as "considering "fallen" as an adjective instead of past participle which will make the sentence passive voice?

Can i say "Tree is fallen" as "considering "fallen" as an adjective instead of "past participle" which will make the sentence passive voice? I know we cannot say &...
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Is 'so young' an adverb or an adjective in this lyrics 'dying so young'?

I'm listening to a Japanese Anisong's English ver. Eiyu Fate's Song (original title: 英雄 運命の詩) by EGOIST. There is a part of lyrics like this: ''To give up who you are and live without your faith is ...
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Depending or dependent? [closed]

"Sometimes the tiles were cold, other times warm, dependent on when I woke up." or "Sometimes the tiles were cold, other times warm, depending on when I woke up." If both are ...
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About substantive adjectives abd their arrangements

Is phrase "those responsible" substansive adjective? Which rule regulate this phrase? As I read, when we want to form substansive adjectie in plural, we add article "the" before ...
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About substantive adjectives

What is the difference between phrases "those sick is laying here" and "the sick is laying here"? Does they mean the same thing?
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Can COMMA be replaced with AND between two adjectives?

Can I replace the COMMA with AND in the following sentence? He was a difficult, stubborn child.
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In the sentence "Wait to be seated" is it in passive voice or is seated and adjective?

I can figure out this sentence is an imperative sentence but is the word "seated" a verb or an adjective? and is it active or passive voice?
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Adjective Order and Commas? Do we need commas in these situations?

I'm a Canadian English speaker trying to review my grammar on coordinate and cumulative adjectives. I know the conversational or natural rules by heart, but I need to teach the rules for writing to my ...
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What is a good way to describe this kind of behavior?

I've been watching a lot of Norm Macdonald lately, and inevitably, you get those kind of comments: RIP Norm - not a good time to lose voices like yours Which is true, but at the same time, on ...
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2 votes
1 answer
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Could 'you were not' be used to replace 'you were away' here?

I was making a sentence to polish up my fiction, I wrote down it out of my instinctive understanding. The three-year time you were not was terrible. This is the background: during the three-year ...
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Adjectives + prepositions

Different adjectives are followed by different prepositions. For example: I'm good at running. or My answer is different from yours. Is there any rule in adding prepositions to adjectives?
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Function of "as" in "Something is as what we would like it to be"

Today I've come across an English sentence that is "Something is as we would like it to be." According to English grammar and the context, I think "as" there can only be an adverb ...
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"Say it simple" or "say it simply"

I haven't confused myself about an adjective and an adverb in a long time, but this one really got me. I am trying to say: "Say it, using simple language, with one clear message." In short: &...
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The best "attributive" adjective describing someone or something that has to take its turn to do something? Can "Due" be attributive?

Let's say three people, A and B and C, must take turn to roll a die. Is it idiomatic and correct to say The due candidate rolls the die either on the table or on the ground depending on the previous ...
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What is suspicious about this phrase " American famous Doctor of Neurology"? [closed]

What is suspicious about this phrase " American famous Doctor of Neurology" circulating on social media?
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The vanishing glass vs The vanished glass

I was reading a grammar book by M. Swan about present and past participle that are used as adjectives when I came across this example: a vanished civilization. In his book Oxford Grammar, he explains ...
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To develop 'Global leading' or to develop 'Globally leading' products? That is the question

I am writing a piece on a company which "strives to develop global leading products". Something irks me about this phrasing, and Grammarly keeps helpfully reminding me that this adverbial (...
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2 votes
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'To be taken serious' or 'to be taken seriously'

The following sentence is from an essay written by a British who is also an former IELTS examiner. ''Global warming should be taken more serious as it can result in a number of disastrous consequences....
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1 answer
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Adjective for multiple nouns

Like many others, I'm still not sure about the right understanding in such complex phrases as ... your greater success, happiness, and fulfillment. Does "greater" apply to all of the ...
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2 votes
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How to use adjective followed by two separate things that are being described?

I am trying to formulate the following sentence: Rob has to find suitable shirt and hat. Is this grammatically correct? it feels a bit strange to me because there is no "a" or "the"...
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QUITE AND MUCH + SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES

It´s possible to use "much" and "quite" as adverbs of degree in front of superlative adjectives?
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his jokes became more unfunny

a. His jokes were not funny at first and then they became even more not funny. Is (a) grammatically correct? It makes sense. I am not sure one could use 'less funny' here, because they were not funny ...
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