Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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1answer
35 views

Shouldn't “Wednesday last” be “last Wednesday”?

In the following sentence I have not seen him since Wednesday last. How is last used? I think it should be I have not seen him since last Wednesday.
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What's the difference between 'that's true' and 'that's right' in English?

'He is good at English,' 'That's true.' And: 'He is good at English,' 'That's right.' According to Collins dictionary, right is defined as: If something is right, it is correct and ...
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235 views

Which part of speech is “left” in this sentence?

I've always thought (perhaps, erroneously) that if there is some ambiguity in determining whether the given word is an adjective or a past participle, you need to look at whether the "source" of ...
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33 views

What does “quite” mean in different contexts?

When I say something is quite clear, does it mean that it's 'so clear' or that it's 'moderately clear but not very'? According to Cambridge dictionary, quite can mean 'very' or 'moderately but not ...
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28 views

Adjectives or Verbs in phrase “He has been .. ”

Are these all adjectives tired, selected, hired? He has been tired to study. He has been selected as an entertainer at the party. The job I had been hired to do was no longer needed. Or, these are ...
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felt still more gloomily

The following extract is from Frankenstein. Does anyone know why the adverb gloomily is used after the linking verb felt? Yet, as I drew nearer home, grief and fear again overcame me. Night also ...
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27 views

A hot-shot business man

"Well-dressed and travels a lot. Are you some kind of hot-shot business man or something?" I see "hot-shot", "hotshot" an "hot shot" used. Are all of them ...
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adjective + to + verb vs adjective + verb+ing

I practice to improve my writting skills. I just learned the following: after adjective we use to + verb. For example, These students are difficult to teach. However, I am confused about the following ...
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How to find the right adjective to a word?

When I am writing an article, from time to time, I am not sure which adjective to use when describing that something is significant (or insignificant). My current problem is: significant advance in ...
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What is the opposite to laudatory when describing an adjective?

For instance, when I say that the word "great" is a laudatory adjective. What would the opposite to that be in the case of a word such as "evil"? Thank you.
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Adjective rules [make(s)/made+ pronoun+adjective]

I am trying to help non native speakers understand the [make(s)/made+ pronoun+adjective] sentence structure. They are struggling with picking the right adjectives. I am getting sentence such as ...
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Can I use Past Simple and Present Simple in one sentence?

Actually I have two questions: Can I use Past Simple and Present Simple together in the sentence: 'He looked stunned when he realized that she lives here'?! I know about Sequence of tenses but I'm ...
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Verb + object + to sb + adjective

Our own identities were simply given to us complete. Why doesn’t the adverb ‘completely’ comes, but adjective ‘complete’ to the end of the sentence above? Is it because that ‘complete’ modify the ...
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Adjective for tax to use in “from a tax standpoint”

Is there any adjective for tax one could use in the phrase "from a tax standpoint"? In French I would say "from a fiscal standpoint" but I don't see the expression in the Google Ngram Viewer and ...
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Article with absolute adjectives

Can we use article with absolute adjectives? Examples: a) He has complete game of the top10 pros. b) He has the complete game of the top 10 pros. a) It's perfect copier ever invented. b) It'...
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Is there an online source to find the right adjective? [closed]

I am looking for a tool that tells me proper potential adjectives for a word. Is there any online source for it? For example, "question" and the source should tell me the options: hard ...
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widow or widowed?

In the following sentence, should we use widow or widowed? Why? My father died when I was nine, and so my mother was a [widow / widowed] with four young children.
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Adjective + noun + noun + noun

In the phrase "appropriate substance use information", what noun does appropriate modify? I'm guessing it is information, is that correct? Is this a general rule? How would you go about modifying ...
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Confused “Complements and adjuncts” in these sentences “Did I hear this correct?” & “Am I reading this right?”

Source Complements and adjuncts are different. A complement is necessary in order to complete the meaning. An adjunct is not necessary, and adds extra information. Compare He put the cake ...
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Is “taken” adjective here?

In this sentence, is “taken” adjective? The imitation process begins when the collection of fashions is presented by models on catwalk through some of photos taken and sent to manufacturers.
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Is there a word describing the feeling when cold water is drank, similar to “spiciness”?

Weird question, but you see how spicy food can be described by the word “spiciness”? How can one describe the feeling when cold water is drank? Do you know any adjective which describes this best?
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Directly asking questions about adjective complements

Can we ask some questions about adjective complements? I was disappointed with your behaviour.(1) Can we ask its question like With what were you disappointed? (2) or What were you ...
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How to describe a 90-degree down instead of up side down?

In a scenario of a box, up side down is a 180 degree down. But, how to describe a 90 degree down? Such as fall down? Thank you!
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Cowardly - Adjective or Adverb?

In the following sentence, is the word 'cowardly' an adjective or adverb? He acted in a cowardly manner. What I understand is the word cowardly is modifying the verb act. So it should be an adverb. ...
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“Spread your legs as WIDE as your shoulders” VS “Spread your legs as WIDELY as your shoulders”

Let's say I am a drill sergeant at a boot camp. In this scenario, I want to tell the recruits that at "parade rest" position, the space between their feet should only be as wide as their ...
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His new song is English vs His new song is an English song vs His new song is in English

If I am talking about a song in English by a musician who is not English, can I use these sentences interchangeably to mean the song is in English? His new song is English. It is an English ...
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Why can't we write “common place”?

Is "common place" a not valid saying in English? As an example: can't we say like "We will meet in a common place"? Spell checkers always suggest to replace it with commonplace ...
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What is the adjective for each of “upheaval” and “debacle”? [closed]

I know some words have their own adjective, and some can be constructed by adding the suffixes like "some", "ic", etc. But how can we mint a neologism, i.e. an adjective, for each ...
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Verb or Adjective

Sometimes we use verb+ing form I don't know what they are gerunds or adjectives. Like in this sentence The car mowed down two people before hitting the tree.
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“These” or “Those” as adjectives for non-tangible nouns?

I know which one to use when describing objects. These pencils are cool. Those trees [300 meters away] are blocking my view. But what happens if the noun you're describing is not tangible? ...
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Either much or a lot of [closed]

What should be used in the following sentence Either much or a lot of and why? He has got many friends because he had got ________ money.
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Distinguishing past participle and adjective when spelled the same

Past Participles A past participle often ends in -ed, but there are also many irregular past participles. For many verbs, including -ed verbs, the simple past and the past participle are the ...
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Can the adjective phrase describe the object of a sentence like this?

Could you please tell me if the sentences I have written are grammatically correct? Can I use adjectives to describe the object of the sentence like this: He hung the flowers on the wall, dried and ...
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Should there be a comma between a shape adjective and color adjective?

Example: A tall(,) green pole. This site says that cumulative adjectives don't need comma. In my example, "tall" describes shape, and "green" describes color. So they are ...
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Does “when” modify the noun?

I will go to the beach next Saturday, so I want to know the weather at the beach next Saturday. I am trying to describe this without referring to the specific time "next Saturday". My examples are ...
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ED endings: identifying Adjectives or Verb Past Participles

I'm having a hard time wrapping my head around this. In the passive voice, we could see sentences like these:    "The car is heated."    "His spirits are lifted."    ...
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Which one is appropriate: “I am taking a recurring training” or “I am taking a recurrent training”

I am emailing my supervisor and I want to let her now that I am taking a training that happens every week at the same time (like a series of trainings).
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Verb (as adjective) + subject vs subject + verb

Which one is correct or seems more natural? Please, walk on the path provided. Please, walk on the provided path. I've looked it up on google and the former seems more common than the latter, but I ...
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Using “opened up ” as adjective

I heard the following in a movie "I want you to open up a little bit" Can I say instead "I want you to be opened up "
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(Large or big) inheritance

I was wondering whether we can swap "large" and "big" in the following example without sounding odd: When her husband died, she came into a large inheritance. I think they both ...
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Any adjective to describe that something I already have?

Is there any existing adjective to describe something I already have? Like, I want to eat the food I already have. I don't want to buy anymore. Is there any adjective alternative for "I already ...
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63 views

Is stupidest a word?

Is the word stupidest grammatically incorrect? I've seen that you have to write "the most stupid," or something like that. But we're taught that stupidest is wrong.
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Putting to+infinitive at the beginning

My question is about the place of to+infinitive in some sentences. For example, 1- Before I went on holiday for a week, I was really eager to study at mathematics. I know this is correct. How ...
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Present tense passive (The moon is made of the same material as earth.)

The moon is made of the same material as earth. I got this sentence from a grammar book as an example of present tense. However, the past participle made is confusing to me. Is this also an example ...
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Should “India soldier 'ambush'“ be replaced by “Indian soldier 'ambush'”?

The Telegraph has this headline: Brutal details emerge of India soldier 'ambush' on contested border with China as Modi tries to calm tension Should India used there be replaced by indian?
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Are both of them correct? [closed]

a. Instead of running straight ahead, ~ b. Instead of straight running ahead, ~ Q1) Are both of them grammatically correct? Q2) If so, do they have the same meaning?
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Parallelizable vs. Parallelable

Which sentence is correct and meaningful? The following computer algorithm is highly parallelizable. The following computer algorithm is highly parallelable.
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Attributive adjective usages

Today I bumped into this: "The woman responsible for this incident is not here at the moment." The sentence sounds perfectly natural and easy for the ears. However, when I replace "the woman"...
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“It was nice meeting you or it was nice talking to you”, What's the grammar?

I'm not sure about this thing, but it has been tormenting me for a while. I can't really understand the grammatical structure of it was nice meeting you. I mean, if nice in itself is an adjective, ...
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Usage of ''as'' before adjective

Can I use "as" to make adjective into adverb like examples below: 1) I always think as different from other people. 2) I always think differently from other people. Are both sentences have same ...

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