Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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Succeed vs Successful

I have this English sentence, The "XYZ" has been successful at mopping up the working-class vote. Since I want to make sure that I've correctly understood the meaning of the two words (the verb ...
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He was mad or madly in love with her?

I found this in Swan's PEU He was mad madly in love with her. It says adverb modifying adverbial phase. But... He was mad in love with her --sounds okay to me as I consider mad as an adjective ...
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My hair is too dry and knotted

My hair is too dry and knotted. My hair is too dry and tangled. Which word is more commonly used? Knotted or tangled?
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Can present simple mean present passive?

Are you married? (Essential Grammar in Use) They may say the tense of the example is present simple. But it is semantically ‘present passive.’ Is this a usage of present simple in English? If yes, ...
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Use of “so many” without specifying: so many WHAT?

I read a certain script of some film. An old man : But so many have been killed. We've lost so many. He said, "so many" instead of "so many people". Is this fine? Natural? I know the word "many" ...
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Usage of “live” and “alive”

live adjective 5. (informal) full of life and energySource: Collins Dictionary – definition of "live" For the meaning above, which of the following usages is correct? Which one would you ...
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Would you help me with choosing the right adjective?

The child's hair must be washed with a strong chemical rinse. Getting rid of lice requires a lot of hard work. The only symptom of head lice is a very strong itching of the head. Would you tell me ...
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What are the differences between “lively”, “alive” and “living”? [duplicate]

Which one is correct or more accurate? "A lively child" or a "child who is alive"? When you want to say a person is not dead and he is normally living in his country, for instance, what do you say? ...
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When would you rather use one over the other?

Thank you so much all for supporting and wrote back to my previous question? They are 15-year-old girls They are 15-year-olds
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Would you help me with using combined adjectives and it's shortened of them? [duplicate]

They are 15-year-old girls They are 15-year-olds Are both of them the same and correct? if so, could anybody possibly kindly tell me when would you rather use which one?
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An adjective for something that has been achieved with a lot of effort through years

I am looking for an adjective that describes something that has been achieved hardly after a lot of effort through years. For instance, hardly-achieved experience OR hardly-gained knowledge. Is ...
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Would you please help me with adjectives? [duplicate]

Could anybody possibly kindly explain me what is the difference between these?- in meaning. They are all 10 years old They are all ten-year-olds
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Translation of “happy about one's share”

What adjective phrase describes a person that is happy with what he has, in contrast to: a person that envies what other people have; a person that complains about what he doesn't have? In Hebrew ...
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Usage of bunch adjectives, not just two or three

A barely visible shining thin blue transparent layer appears around the bulb. Here I used 5 adjectives "barely visible", "shining", "thin", "blue", "transparent". Is this correct? Can I add so many ...
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What is a “pulpy orange”?

From Hemingway's Farewell to Arms The soldier would not take the penny I offered him and brought me a pulpy orange. I sucked on that and spit out the pith. What is the difference between a pulpy ...
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Usage of Disinterested vs. uninterested

Both words seem to mean the following: Having or feeling no interest in something or someone. When do we use disinterested vs. uninterested? Are they interchangeable?
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“All items have weight one” or “All items have weights one”

I'm a little confused about which of the following sentences are correct: All items have weight one. All items have weights one. All items have the weight one. Similarly, in these sentences: The ...
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By what name do you call this phrase starting with an adjective?

Fearful, however, of losing this first and only opportunity of relieving my grief by imparting it, I, after a disturbed pause, contrived to frame a meagre, though, as far as it went, true response. ...
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How to describe this plot?

Is it good to say the smaller the parameter is, the outer the curve. or alternatively, the bigger the parameter is, the inner the curve. I don't feel they are natural. What do you think? I am ...
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What is meant by disturbing in this context

My girlfriend and I do not agree on the meaning of the following: "It's disturbing" I say that it could mean two things: it is interrupting it is unsettling But she thinks it can only mean It is ...
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Close Vs Closed and Open Vs. Opened

Which board is proper to describe the state of any shop/restaurant? For instance, A restaurant with the board Close OR Closed? A restaurant with the board Open OR Opened? Well, if I think '...
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How to interpret the sentence “I heard a little silvery laugh”?

I'm trying to interpret the sentence: I heard a little silvery laugh. What confuses me is I don't know if the speaker hear "a little laugh which sounded silvery" or "a somewhat silvery laugh"? ...
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What is the difference between“energy saving” and “energy savings”? [duplicate]

When I read the papers, I sometimes see the phrases energy saving and energy savings. I don't understand how they are different. Compare these sentences: 1) However, the maximum energy saving ...
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“energy saving” vs. “energy savings”

Assume that A and B are two systems. For example A consumes 3unit and B consumes 4unit of the energy. Now we know to A saves 0.25% in energy consumption than B.I want to draw a diagram and want to ...
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What's the meaning of “practical” in this contect?

Technique is defined on OALD as: [countable] a particular way of doing something, especially one in which you have to learn special skills The artist combines different techniques in ...
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“How long was it displaced” vs. “how far was it displaced”

How to ask a question using "displaced" when an article is displaced some distance? Is it "how long was it displaced?" or "how far was it displaced?"
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“reject pile” or “rejected pile”?

In the pantheon of classic modern buildings, Utzon's creation has the status of myth. The myth states that the unknown architect, then in his early thirties, submitted rough sketches to the ...
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Using the adjectives 'very' and 'own' for our (own!) body organs

The adjectives 'very' and 'own' mean precisely as stated or being exactly the same and not any other. I understand a subtle difference between my bike and my own bike in below mentioned instance - ...
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what (color hair vs. hair color) do you have?

My hair color is black, and the question should be what is your hair color? or what hair color do you have?. However, it turns out surprisingly to me that the question with do is: what color hair do ...
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Am I right in using these adjectives as described below?

I use these adjectives to show the amount of any entity (Sorted from highest to lowest) LIQUID/SOLID as applicable: I need a lot of milk to drink now-a-days. (Highest in quantity) I need a good ...
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Can I say “voted polls” to mean the polls I have voted in?

How can I correctly identify polls I have voted in? Is “voted polls” right? Or there is a better way?
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How do I convert a verb to adjective?

I want to say "You need activate added user." but I don't know why I say it. I don't know any rule for which I can say added user.
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“Incredulous” as an adverb

The below quote is an example that Longman has provided to illustrate the usage of the adjective "incredulous". I believe in this example, "incredulous" in used as an adverb. Please help me understand ...
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Adjective or Adverb: unconsciously vs unconscious

Position of Adjectives: An adjective nearly always appears immediately before the noun or noun phrase that they modify. The source is here. But if you look at the following sentence, the adjective "...
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“exempt” usage: adjective or verb

Children are exempt from the charges. Children are exempted from the charges. From these two sentences, the former is an example Longman dictionary provides for the word "exempt". My ...
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“Salted rim glass” vs “rimmed salt glass”

Which one is correct; The drink is served in a salted rim glass or The drink is served in a rimmed salt glass
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Adverb vs. adjective

I am not sure which sentence is correct. In general the weights could be arbitrary chosen, but one special case is obtained by using exponential weights. In general the weights could be ...
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“Normal distributed” or “normally distributed”

I am not sure if I should use an adjective or an adverb in the following sentences. The returns are normal distributed. The returns are normally distributed. Also see this example: ...
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Making a new adjective

I have just finished reading a book. It was so boring that sometimes I fell asleep. I will never buy such "put-to-sleep" books like that anymore. I would like to know if the adjective put-to-sleep ...
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Briton vs briton vs British

Two Briton rock musicians are visiting Japan. Two briton rock musicians are visiting Japan. (Lowercase 'b'). Two British rock musicians are visiting Japan. Out of the three, which are correct?
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Using an adjective form instead of the verb form

Many of the concepts covered require the reader to abandon comfortable modes of thought In the above sentence, the word "covered" is a verb. I was wondering could that sentence be rephrased like ...
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May I use a phrasal verb as an adjective, like “commented out code”?

I'd like to express that some old code that has been commented out should be removed. May I phrase it as follows? Remove old, commented out code.
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“You iron clothes if they are […]”

These jeans are […], you need to iron it. After the washing machine, the clothes are […]. You have to iron them. What adjective would you fill in the gaps with? My dictionary gives me wrinkled, ...
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What is the texture of a fruit which is not hard/fresh anymore?

When I pick up an apple from the garden, it is rather hard. If I then wait for 2 weeks, it becomes _ _ _ , which means it is not hard anymore, and not as tasty because the food's texture has changed. ...
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Can “certain” imply a negative opinion about something/somebody?

In Italian, if I say Indossano certe scarpe. (which Google Translate translates as "They wear certain shoes."), I would be expressing a negative opinion about the shoes, for example that the shoes are ...
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In the north of the country?

I want to say I come from a city in the northern part of the country. Would the following be correct? I come from X, which is a city in the north of the country. It sounds unnatural.
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“Bitter” versus “embittered”

I have difficulty understanding the exact difference between these two adjectives, semantically. This is quote from a native English speaker: Parasite single? I guess an embittered parent wrote ...
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Idiomatic English expressions for “dead tired”, “soaking drunk”, “full packed”

I have a question about using pairs of adjectives in everyday English speech. Italian uses pairs of adjectives to emphasize a quality and some idiomatic and colloquial expressions are commonly ...
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“Due to expectedly inclement weather conditions…”

Does this sound okay? "Due to expectedly inclement weather conditions..." I am especially interested in the use of "expectedly."