Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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1answer
27 views

The difference between “each”, “both”, either

The issue is confusing to me. That's what I heard from natives. 1 The house has a door at either end. 2 The house has a door at both ends. Some say that 1 and 2 are correct and mean that there are ...
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Doesn’t an adjective describe a meaning of the noun? [closed]

I don’t understand ‘once-young adult’ is a possible phrase. Adjectives should describe a meaning of a noun, but ‘once-young’ does not qualify the noun because ‘adult’ means an old person.
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Is adj+noun=noun+(which to be) adj?

It was not the action intentional = It was not the action which was intentional = It was not the intentional action. Is 1st sentence right and is it grammatically correct? is the 1st sentence equal to ...
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29 views

When MUST we use noun phrase + adjective , not adjective + noun?

I always catch my students using adj + noun even when it's not suitable but I don't know how to explain why we can't always do that and what the rule is. For example: Mental health issue people need ...
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3answers
965 views

Positive, comparative, superlative and… is there a fourth?

I'm wondering whether English has something beyond its superlative degree. In my language we call that "túlzófok", it literally translates to "exaggerative degree." I'm wondering because I often hear ...
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2answers
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unbearable discrimination

a. They spoke out against the unbearable discrimination they witnessed there. b. They spoke out against the insufferable sexism in their workplace. Do these imply that 'they' consider some amount of ...
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1answer
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Poetic expression with an adjective

If a dog is surrounded by happy people, can I express it as ‘a dog happy around itself’? I mean, is it technically possible even though this expression is very rarely used? In my native language, if ...
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1answer
50 views

His new song is English vs His new song is an English song vs His new song is in English

If I am talking about a song in English by a musician who is not English, can I use these sentences interchangeably to mean the song is in English? His new song is English. It is an English ...
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1answer
10 views

Which paraphrase is correct?

Being about the same size as a domestic chicken, the kiwi bird lays eggs that are very large in proportion to its body size. A) The eggs of the kiwi bird are much larger than those of a domestic ...
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1answer
36 views

‘Alive’ in phrase ‘get out alive’

There are no adverb alive, but how is ‘get out alive’ grammatical? Is alive an adjectival complement? However, get out is not copular and a predicative adjective should be after a linking verb. The ...
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1answer
27 views

Quality qualifies quality

I don’t understand how a quality qualifies the same quality (even though my native language does). For example, small size, yellow color, hot weather. I think size is small, color is yellow and ...
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4answers
206 views

Can 'whole' be used as an adverb?

It rained the whole week except on Sunday. In this question is the word 'whole' an adverb? Or since the word 'week' is a noun, will it become a determiner?
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Slightly weaker adjective than “heavily” in “heavily used”?

This is a very simple question, but I found it's something hard to search for on the internet. When something is used a lot, we can say "something is heavily used". If it's almost abandoned, ...
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29 views

Can I use “box of chocolates” and “chocolate box” interchangeably?

The same with "list of cities" vs "city list", or "list of users" vs "user list", etc.
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1answer
103 views

How do I use 'amicable' in a sentence?

I've made some sentences with the word 'amicable': An amicable family. Our relationships are amicable. We get on amicably. Does it sound normal for a native English speaker? If my sentences are ...
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2answers
31 views

Can I avoid an oxymoron like this?

‘Nonperson person’ is an oxymoron. Then, what about ‘yesterday-nonperson person’ as in ‘the werewolf is now a yesterday-nonperson person’? It means he was a nonperson wolf yesterday, but he changed ...
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1answer
9 views

ed forms of Adjectives for intransitive verbs

Why there are no adjectives(-ed form)for intransitive verbs, for example, words like happened (It was happened), occurred (It was occurred), etc, While transitive verbs having the adjectives ending ...
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1answer
57 views

What part of speech is up in the sentence, the time is up

This sentence, the time is up, is confusing me. I think up is a preposition
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1answer
40 views

“to be keenly interested in”

It is correct to use "to be keenly interested in", but "to be keen on sth" means "to be interested in sth", and so, isn't it essentially saying "interestedly ...
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3answers
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Is “drawable” a correct word?

In French, we have the word "dessinable" which is an adjective for something that can be "dessiné" or in English that can be drawn. However, when I search the term "drawable&...
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Do we reply “approve” or “approved” in an approval request email?

If you were to approve the following email: Dear Tom, Kindly requesting for your approval on the enclosed content. Regards, Bob What would you write? Approve. Regards, Tom ...
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3answers
3k views

My father and my birthday/My father's birthday and mine/My father's and my birthday…something else?

As an esl teacher I'm a bit embarrassed about this one. I have some groups on WhatsApp to practice English and in one of them a student put: "Today is birthday of my father and my." What would the ...
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1answer
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What is the difference between “stressed” and “stressful”?

"Stressed" and "Stressful" are these two words both adjectives? And what is the difference between the two? In the dictionary it says: stressed - feeling very worried or anxious. stressful ...
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1answer
43 views

use of adjectives in different places

Are there any difference between two use of adjective in diffrent places in two sentence below ? Does these sentences have different meaning or one of these is wrong? New house was sold at ten ...
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1answer
47 views

Clear-watered pond - is this right?

Is "clear-watered" an adjective like "soft-petalled"? Is it right to say, "The clear-watered pond was serene to look at"
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2answers
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Present tense passive (The moon is made of the same material as earth.)

The moon is made of the same material as earth. I got this sentence from a grammar book as an example of present tense. However, the past participle made is confusing to me. Is this also an example ...
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2answers
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How to understand “They were not looking at you funny”?

A quote from the movie The Guardians of the Galaxy vol 2: They were not looking at you funny. How to explain the syntactic construction of this sentence? Why does the speaker put funny at the end? I ...
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1answer
223 views

Usage of ''as'' before adjective

Can I use "as" to make adjective into adverb like examples below: 1) I always think as different from other people. 2) I always think differently from other people. Are both sentences have same ...
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3answers
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What part of speech is “my” in the sentence?

This is my book. What part of speech is "my" in the sentence above? This may be considered a silly question to ask, but I have referred to some dictionaries such as Word Master and Oxford's Advanced ...
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2answers
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Ineffectual vs. ineffective

Why is that there are different suffixes of adj.?, but it seems to have the same meaning Ex. Ineffective leadership and Ineffectual leadership Is there any difference?
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1answer
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“The Dancing Queen” is using dancing applicable here?

I was watching a movie last night and It was a musical one. The movie involved a song named "The Dancing Queen". Now, I know that the word "Dancing" is not an adjective. For ...
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Is it always possible to use the pattern “the + adjective”?

I found out that it's possible to use the definite article "the" with adjectives, to refer to a group of people with a particular characteristic, e.g. the rich, the disabled, the poor, and ...
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“less cheap” Vs. “less cheaper”

If I see two products that are cheap, for example, if normally each product costs $10 and now one of them (product A) costs $5 and the second (product B) costs $7. Then what will be the correct form ...
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Prepositional Phrase vs Participle Phrase

Following the meeting, we all had a chat. In the above sentence, what is Following used as. Is it a adjective or preposition or both? Also,is following the meeting a prepositional phrase or participle ...
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'Merry of soul', part of a sentence in one of Stevenson's poems: is it grammatically correct and why?

'Merry of soul' I came across that phrase in a song called 'skye boat song', I have also learned that it's a quote from one of Stevenson's poems. I understand that merry is an adjecctive that means ...
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373 views

Is 'I'm' a verb, noun, adjective, or adverb? [closed]

I am currently doing my online work, and I was sorting verbs, nouns, adjectives and adverbs. I was doing well, until 'I'm' came up. I would really appreciate it if someone could answer my question, is ...
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be careful that-clause and be careful wh-clause

I'll be more careful what I say in the future. We were very careful that he didn't find out. The that-clause in sentence 2 is a complement of the adjective careful. The wh-clause in sentence 1 seems ...
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2answers
50 views

Differences between 'pointy' and 'pointed' when describe a noun?

Which sentence below is right? If both, are there any differences? Wolves have pointed faces. Wolves have pointy faces. The definitions of each are very similar: Pointy: Having a pointed tip or end....
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1answer
23 views

How can I use the world “neighboring ” and associate it with a country?

I'm trying to say the following context, but I'm not sure which structure I can go with ?? Different Versions of the context : 1- I'm just reciting USA'S neighboring countries. 2- I'm just reciting ...
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“Adjective Complements” in major English grammar books?

Are there any major English grammar books (like CGEL, PEU, etc.) that list "adjective complements" as one of main constituents of a predicate (or a sentence pattern)? https://www....
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I don't like speaking in public (is public an adjective or noun here?)

I speak to the public. I am speaking in public. It doesn't seem grammatically correct at all I am speaking "in public" . I am speaking "out in the open." We don't say, 'I am ...
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Adjective order/plural form of “ninety”, “story/stories”, and “tall.”

I was doing some multiple choice exercises. One of them was:- A fire in the ..... building could be a problem for firefighters 1- Ninety-story-tall 2-ninety-tall-story 3-ninety-stories-tall 4-ninety ...
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Is it natural to use “difficult” about a person?

This is said by an idiot husband in a story I'm writing: Don't mind her. She's just got her period. That's why she's a little difficult. Is it perfectly natural to use "difficult" about a ...
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Adverb or Adjective?

How to use and differentiate between linking verb and main verb? For example, in the below sentences, should I use adjective or adverb: He did great / greatly. She dances amazing / amazingly. He ...
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1answer
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tasty dishes vs delicious meals

Is there some difference in these phrases or not? tasty dishes vs delicious meals Maybe "delicious meals" are more tasty than "tasty dishes"? Are "Dishes" and "...
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3k views

What part of speech is “difficult”

It is exceedingly difficult to ascertain precisely what is meant by the word 'culture'. That is a sentence from exercise for English learners where they are asked to determine the part of speech of ...
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Verb to Adjective “inviteable” or “invitable”?

I really wonder what's the right way to make a verb to adjective? "inviteable" or "invitable"? "closeable" or "closable"? Are there rules about these or it's just my decision which one to use?
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What's the adjective of the word “use”

If I want to say "popular" about the cars. Cars were more (popular) than now days In the sense that they were used a lot, what's the adjective I should use? Not popular, but... (adjective ...
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1answer
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What is the function of “unmodified” in “It is passed unmodified to the next block”?

What I have learnt so far, an adverb can be placed adjacent to a verb. For example, It is directly passed to the next block. or It is passed directly to the next block. I found a sentence as ...
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28k views

“A small question” versus “a little question”

Which adjective should I use with question, small or little?

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