Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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7
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1answer
394 views

“Black and white dogs”: ambiguity with coordinate adjectives

A black and a white dog means "two dogs". A black and white dog means "one dog". Then what about black and white dogs? Does this mean two things? "Dogs, each of black and white color" and "dogs of ...
7
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1answer
810 views

-ed and -ing adjective, how to use it properly?

Why is it grammatically correct to use these -ing adjectives: annoying habit exciting news and NOT these -ed adjectives: annoyed habit excited news
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Grammatically correct? 'big fat funny cats' and 'fat silly cats'

As someone who didn't emphasize on learning grammar at all, I still sometimes find a case that calls for grammar rules. I was asked which one is correct: fat silly cats or silly fat cats? ...
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3answers
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The Times is a highly (respected or respectable) journal?

What is the correct usage? The Times is a highly (respected or respectable) journal. And if we changed the sentence to this, would you change your choice? The Times is a highly (respected or ...
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2answers
217 views

Usage of alternate vs alternative with “equally”

Here's the scenario of the usage: ... doing something is equally alternate to dooming yourself. or, ... doing something is equally alternative to dooming yourself. Which is the correct usage? ...
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2answers
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Are the highlighted past participles acting as adjectives or passive voice in these examples?

The park was covered with snow. Mr. Smith is known to everyone in this town. The legislator participates in the delegation and is involved in sweeping reforms. English is spoken in the ...
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3answers
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Should there be a comma between a shape adjective and color adjective?

Example: A tall(,) green pole. This site says that cumulative adjectives don't need comma. In my example, "tall" describes shape, and "green" describes color. So they are ...
2
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2answers
555 views

Exclusion in formation of comparative statements

I was going through the topic "formation of comparative and superlative". The rule says When two objects are compared with each other, the latter term of comparison must exclude the former, ...
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1answer
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Is there any difference between very & much?

Please tell which one is correct. I am much interested. Or I am very Interested. Please explain scientifically.
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4answers
394 views

Are these Dummy subjects?

Are these Dummy subjects? It was nice to see him It's obvious that in this sentence "It" is a dummy subject and the sentence can be reconstructed as "To see him was nice". But what about this: It ...
63
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7answers
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Why can “low” become “lower” and “lowest”, while “up” can't?

Why can "low" become lower (comparative) and lowest (superlative), while "up" can become only comparative (upper), rather than superlative (uppest)? The second question is what does act as a ...
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5answers
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“my” vs “mine” (adjectives vs. possessive )

Is correct to say "my question is" or "mine question is". When I talk, I automatically use "my question is", but "mine" is a possessive pronoun and somehow when I think about it (and translate it ...
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4answers
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Why is “crime story” more correct than “criminal story”?

Criminal is an adjective and story is a noun. Why is "crime story" used instead of "criminal story"? While both crime and story are nouns. What's this latter combination? Is "criminal story" even ...
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3answers
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Is “deep” an adjective or adverb?

She worked quickly but without hurry. She put an old apron to cover her clothes. In the basement she found a jelly jar with a top and carried it out to the carriage house where the tools were kept. In ...
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1answer
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How to say that my English isn't very good?

A: My English is poor. B: My English is not good. C: I am not good at English. D: My English is bad. Which one is more appropriate to use in conversation?
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1answer
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When to use articles before adjectives in a sentence?

I am struggling a bit with when I need to use a/an/the before adjective followed by a noun. I understand the rules for articles in general but I discovered that this particular case is always ...
5
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1answer
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to be due something - in the meaning of expecting, owing

I am desperately trying to understand this concept. Lets use this sentence: The world is due ‘a major cyber attack causing widespread harm’ before 2025, say experts”. Dictionaries do not ...
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1answer
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“It is not well” or “it is not good”?

Watching an old Dr. Who episode, one character said to another, "Highness, it is not well to think of the past, there is still the future to make." ("The Ribos Operation", 1978) To my ear, this ...
3
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2answers
889 views

Why “think bright” is used with adjective instead of adverb (think brightly)? [duplicate]

I find "think bright" is much more common usage, but why? In my opinion, "Think" is a verb, so it is reasonable to use adverb to describe it. Examples: THINK BRIGHT! The National University ...
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3answers
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“Desolated”; past tense of an adjective?

He looks around the desolated street. In this sentence, If I'm not wrong, 'desolated' is an adjective, right? Or is it a verb? In the dictionary 'desolate' is defined as an adjective. "Desolated" is ...
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2answers
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“A little” Vs. “The little” (in reply to “Have you got any money?”)

A: Have you got any money? B: Yes, a little A: Have you got any money? B: yes, the little How a little is differ from the little in above context? As far as I know the meaning of "a little" ...
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5answers
196 views

By the homeless OR homelessess

I heard it was possible to make a noun from an adjective like: They are poor and live there. All the poors live there. We mean "poor people" by the adjective "poor" + "s", like the plural form of ...
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Rule for using “the” with nationality

My English teacher taught me about usage of "the" in any sentence. There was one thing which he taught that you have to use "the" with any nationality which ends with "sh", "se", "ss" and "ch" E.g. ...
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superlative without “the” [duplicate]

Is my use of the superlative in the following sentence correct? People in Germany don't care whether there are Jews, Muslims, Christians, followers of other religions or atheists in a store. They ...
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Usage of “live” and “alive”

live adjective 5. (informal) full of life and energySource: Collins Dictionary – definition of "live" For the meaning above, which of the following usages is correct? Which one would you ...
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1answer
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“-ic” vs “-ical”, which to use

Is there a rule about when an adjective should end with "ic" or "ical"? Geometr-ic Analyt-ical Theoret-ical Kinet-ic
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Bizarre, eccentric, funny, odd, strange, unusual and weird

I can't find much differences among these words above, neither from my what little English experience, nor from my dictionary's translations. So far, I know at least "odd", "weird" and "strange" have ...
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1answer
86 views

Is “Pour water into every a certain numbers of glasses ” acceptable?

There are 100 glasses arranged in a row. When I would like someone to pour water into the 3rd glass, the 6th glass, ..., I think I can say Please pour water into every three glasses or every 3rd ...
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1answer
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past — a postpositive adjective?

Usage example with a context: Putin, like Hitler, lives in a mental time-warp that was outmoded already in 1914 — see his strangely 19th century views on diplomacy — and would be laughably obsolete ...
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1answer
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Can a proper noun be used as adjective?

I was reading an editorial in 'The Hindu' and I came across a phrase in the headline: A difficult campaign: on the Pakistan elections Is it correct? 'the Pakistan elections'. I don't know if a ...
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3answers
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The role of 'sleeping' in 'sleeping baby'

A "sleeping baby" generally means a baby that is sleeping at the time of speaking, as shown in this sentence: After finishing all the feeding, bathing and nappy-changing duties, a number of dads ...
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3answers
318 views

“Paingry” can be only used as an adjective?

Can the word paingry be used only as adjective? "I was too paingry to react" I am paingry, ha!
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1answer
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Can I use “few” with “staff”?

I am curious to know if you would use "few staff" in a sentence. I find it very strange, but have found some examples for the construction when I googled it. I have always thought that "few" could ...
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2answers
276 views

“Some” vs “some of” with adjective

Suppose an application user selects certain objects and then attempts to perform an operation involving them. Which of the following responses is correct, and why? Operation is not supported ...
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1answer
597 views

missing commas between coordinate adjectives?

to reach a mutually-agreed long-term comprehensive solution that would ensure Iranˈs nuclear program will be exclusively peaceful. As I see, in the noun phrase a mutually-agreed long-term ...
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2answers
113 views

Difference between similar words like “electric-electrical”?

What is the difference between words like: Electric-Electrical ? For example is it correct to say Electric engineer rather than Electrical ?
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1answer
319 views

How do I describe the two types of adjectives, terminologically?

In adjectives there are two main groups: First Group: adjectives that their 3 grades (base, comparative and superlative) are changed whether regularly (nice > nicer > nicest) or irregularly (good > ...
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“The man standing …” a gerund or an adjective?

Please tell me if "standing" is a gerund or an adjective- The man standing over there is a friend of mine.
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3answers
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Is the order of adjectives correct?

Is the order of adjectives correct? "Delicate golden body" "Then something small, golden and fierce jumped on Allen’s body"
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1answer
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Is “very much” an adverb or an adjective?

I would like to know what "very much" is in terms of grammatical classification. Is it an adjective, adverb or other part of speech?
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1answer
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Use of [any other] in a sentence

The Nile is longer than any river in India. The Nile is longer than any other river in the world. In both of these above sentences, we are comparing one river with the rest. But still we have ...
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1answer
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The definite article before superlative degree [duplicate]

What are the special cases when we can't use "the" before superlative degree? I'd like the answers with proper explanations. Some of the examples: He is most likely to succeed. It is fairest of all ...
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“Despicable Me”: can “me” be used in such a way?

We know a movie named Despicable Me. I guess it means "I am despicable". But can me be used in such a way? For example, can I further say unavoidable me to mean "I am unavoidable"? Are there other ...
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3answers
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Is “drawable” a correct word?

In French, we have the word "dessinable" which is an adjective for something that can be "dessiné" or in English that can be drawn. However, when I search the term "drawable&...
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Confused using the word 'Transgendered'

If we go by the dictionaries like OALD and MacMillan, the word is adjective and used for a person who is in between male and female. But, I often read 'transgender man' or 'woman'. Here, ...
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1answer
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The meaning of “still-beating”

I could hear a still-beating pulse of his heart. Could it mean two things? It is still beating. (still now) It is beating quietly.
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Verb to Adjective “inviteable” or “invitable”?

I really wonder what's the right way to make a verb to adjective? "inviteable" or "invitable"? "closeable" or "closable"? Are there rules about these or it's just my decision which one to use?
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1answer
735 views

What is the difference between “is subject to” and “is subjected to”?

I found the following sentence on the U.S. Customs and Border Protection website: All persons, baggage, and other merchandise arriving in or leaving the United States are subject to inspection ...
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1answer
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Many/Much more difficult problems

Pick the correct sentence: There were many more difficult problems than we were thought possible. There were much more difficult problems than we were thought possible. I think both are correct. The ...
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13k views

Was Married or Had Married?

I want to say. Couple did marriage on 1 April and after 5 years they taken divorce. How should is say? A) They were married on 1 April 2014 and taken divorce after 5 years. B) They had married on 1 ...