Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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2answers
41 views

'A high pyramid' or 'a tall pyramid'—which is correct and why?

It seems the more I learn the language, the more complicate it becomes for my mind. At school, our teacher taught us that 'tall' is used for people and 'high' for inanimate objects. Then, when I got ...
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1answer
18 views

A term for only a pre-noun and a post-noun adjective

The red ball is expensive. The ball is red. The answer is absolutistic in its nature. The absolutistic answer that he provided didn't quite fit the given problem. In the four examples above I can ...
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0answers
22 views

Why is it “you look beautiful” and not “you look beautifully”? [duplicate]

You look beautiful "Beautiful" is an adjective here. We often use "adverbs" to modify "verbs". Here the verb is "look" and instead of an adverb, we have an ...
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1answer
47 views

“He is small enough to walk.” But baby wasn't walking so why didn't they use “small” instead of “small enough”? [duplicate]

I'm confused because in my textbook there's a sentence: He is small enough to walk. because baby was so small that he couldn't walk. Why didn't they just use small instead of small enough?
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1answer
31 views

Has verb3 or Has been verb3

The light has gone for a while now. The light has been gone for a while now. I think both of these are correct but can't understand why. Could you please shed some light on it?
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1answer
59 views

Is the subject complement a noun or an adjective here?

It's well-known that a subject complement can be a noun or an adjective. It's not hard to make out what part of speech the subject complement belongs to— For example, in He is a pilot and She is ...
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1answer
81 views

How do I use 'amicable' in a sentence?

I've made some sentences with the word 'amicable': An amicable family. Our relationships are amicable. We get on amicably. Does it sound normal for a native English speaker? If my sentences are ...
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1answer
29 views

Why do we say “main site header” and “main site style” instead of “site main header” and “site main style”?

When I want to say that a website has a main header, I and almost everyone else say the main site header, but I feel this is wrong because the adjective refers to the header, not the website. The same ...
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1answer
70 views

What's the difference between 'time-consuming' and 'time-consumed'?

How do I distinguish whether to use v-ing or v-ed within compound adjective?
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1answer
13 views

Difference between 'a place good for' and 'a good place for'

Take a look at these sentences: a. This is a place good for business. b. This is a good place for business. Is there any difference between the meanings of the above sentences?
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1answer
58 views

Can articles modify adjectives?

I came across a sentence where a modifier seemed to be modifying an possessive adjective. These are not the same sentences but they work similarly (the article's and adjectives I'm wondering about are ...
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2answers
17 views

In the sentence “we always buy toilet paper in bulk”, does 'in bulk' function as an adverb or adjective?

Does in bulk modify buy as in we buy loads of toilet paper or does it elaborate on the number of toilet papers we buy? Is one way of seeing it less wrong than the other? Based on my intuition, I am ...
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0answers
3 views

Can I refer to those certificates as Qualification certificates?

I have qualified some exams. Now I need to send those certificate to a recruiter. Can I refer to those certificates as Qualification certificates?
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3answers
53 views

What is the adjective/verb describing someone who is repeatedly explaining itself in an argument when rest of the people already got the point

I don't remember if it is adjective describing a person or action, but I had come across an adjective describing someone who is constantly reapiting itself when trying expalining something. It occures ...
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1answer
13 views

Using “lacking” without specifying an exact area

There is an adjective "lacking" which could be used in a form like "lacking in sth", e.g. He is lacking in confidence. Is it possible to use it without providing specific area, e....
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Why do you say “air conditioned” and not “conditioned air”?

For a non-native English speaker, it seems that "air" is a noun and "conditioned" is an adjective. Following the correct word order, the adjective should precede the noun, so it ...
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1answer
22 views

How does ellipses work in these sentences?

In the book Angel and Demons, Dan Brown says under chapter 3: The camber was dark. Medieval. Stone. To me it looks like a very telegraphic kind of describing a space, which is very different than ...
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1answer
28 views

Had been operative Vs had been operated

What is the difference between had been operative and had been operated. Example : the machines had been operative at the premises. the machines had been operated at the premises. Would it be ...
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1answer
19 views

The known unknowns

Is "known" an adjective while "unknown" is a noun here? The known unknowns of T cell immunity to COVID-19 Abstract: Tremendous progress has been made in understanding the role of ...
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1answer
36 views

Adjective form of “develop” as a transitive verb

Can I use developing as an adjective, in reference to something that has developed something else? That is, if I say "It was a developing experience", does it work in the sense 'the ...
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1answer
15 views

Please explain the use of the word Easy in this sentence

The tennis player, easy through the opening set against her opponent, rallied to take the final two sets for the biggest victory of her young career. Of the following pattern, which one is implied ...
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1answer
17 views

Order of consecutive determinatives

Is there any accepted order for different determiners? I read in an article that “determiners” come before adjectives, but what about different kinds of determiner? For example: The memory of Lilian’...
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1answer
32 views

part of speech of 'much' in 'That's too much of a hassle'

What is the part of speech of 'much' in 'That's too much of a hassle'? While this sounds so simple and basic, the answer could not seem to converge on one. The answer may be (a) a noun, although a ...
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3answers
28 views

Adjective for a fraction that can't be represented in a simpler way

7/21 can still be represented as 1/3, 3/12 can still be represented as 1/4, 2/26 can still be represented as 1/13, but 9/13 can not be represented in any simpler way. So, if I ask a student to find ...
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0answers
47 views

(Singular or Plural Noun Adjunct) Stories Feature or Story Feature?

What should we call the feature in Instagram and other websites that lets you post stories - "stories feature" or "story feature"? This question is similar: https://english....
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796 views

Why do we say AWS service and not service of AWS?

Why do we say in English things like a Facebook post, an AWS service, the Silicon Valley, etc.? In Portuguese, we would say "A post of Facebook", "a service of AWS", and "the ...
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1answer
158 views

“New” adjective in comparative form

There's a rule about one-syllable adjectives that end in a single vowel and a consonant, that duplicates the consonant in the comparative form: big --> bigger hot --> hotter I've been asking ...
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1answer
32 views

questions about flabby

He is a bit on the flabby side. Is it clear that this is about weight? Is flabby commonly used this way? Would "flabby" be seen as a comedic way to describe that someone is overweight? ...
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1answer
21 views

Lexicon usage, adjectives order

He was carrying a nice new black leather briefcase. He was carrying a nice black new leather briefcase. Is there any difference?
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correct adjective: (a clear memory) or (a strong memory) or (a deep memory)

(1) Jack has a clear memory of his most important childhood event. (2) Jack has a strong memory of his most important childhood event. (3) Jack has a deep memory of his most important childhood event. ...
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can i use followed in place of following in following sentence

what if i replace following with followed in following sentence However, schools are supposed to prepare the youths for their lives following high school.
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What is “shut” in “close the door shut”?

I have heard the sentence "close the door shut" a lot. However I am not sure about the function of "shut". Is it an adverb or an adjective here? How do I parse this sentence? I am ...
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1answer
29 views

is repulsively a correct word?

In the following sentence, does it make sense to use "repulsively" as an adverb? the most repulsively nationalistic sporting event. Generally, what is the best way to find out if an ...
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0answers
17 views

She's got hair of a raven VS She's got raven hair

She's got hair of a raven Can we just omit "of" when we cannot add a suffix to a noun to turn it into an adjective? For example, She's got raven hair I mean situations where if a suffix ...
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29 views

Is “unaware” appropriate here?

Jeff: So what do you think of our new coach? The new coach steps into the locker room. Unaware, Jeff goes on -- Jeff: What an idiot, huh? I mean, who the hell does he think he is? Question: Is "...
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2answers
44 views

Why is it “Server Side Include” instead of “Server-Side Include”?

Thanks to Lambie I recently learned that compound adjectives are hyphenated, for example server-side request forgery. When looking up server-side include(s), it appears that most places write this ...
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1answer
80 views

Is there a difference between 'a small smile' and 'a little smile'?

I was really angry but managed a small/little smile. Is there any difference between a small smile and a little smile?
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2answers
71 views

Is adj+noun=noun+(which to be) adj?

It was not the action intentional = It was not the action which was intentional = It was not the intentional action. Is 1st sentence right and is it grammatically correct? is the 1st sentence equal to ...
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73 views

Adjectives in the introductory there structure can come after nouns?

I have seen in some grammar book the following pattern, which allows to place an adjective after a noun: A shelf is empty. ➔ There is a shelf empty. I want to know whether the above pattern is a ...
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1answer
23 views

Is the number of year plus s used as an adj?

For a sentence from a ACT English test: Her goal was to revive the literary boom of the 1920s Harlem Renaissance of which she had been a part. So my question is, since there is no comma after "...
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2answers
27 views

Plural adjectives of plural nouns: “Device terminals” VS “devices terminals”

My mother tongue is Spanish. I'm trying to complete a legend for a technical drawing I'm doing. The text I'm writing doesn't have a context that makes it clear what I want to say. I want to put a ...
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1answer
13 views

If one tool of the kit is intended to be used in another one, then the description should have a reference to another/the other tool?

Which one is correct: If one tool of the kit is intended to be used in another one, then the description should have a reference to ANOTHER tool. If one tool of the kit is intended to be used in ...
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2answers
37 views

“I have 6 legs, hands, and eyes.” - that sounds nonsensical, doesn't it? How to state a total for a list of items without any ambiguity?

Okay, this might be a very basic question, but I can't seem to figure this out. Usually, a single adjective modifies multiple nouns or noun phrases individually in a series. For example, "expired&...
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1answer
38 views

Noun after “have been”

Here is a part of ACTIVE Skills for Reading 2, page 137: Humans have traditionally been omnivores, with a diet of both meat and vegetables. But lately it seems we've become a society of meat eaters. ...
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2answers
31 views

Want + to be + adj or want + adj

Which one is correct? I want him out I want him to be out Thank you very much
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1answer
5 views

Can I use single adjective with auxilary IS

Can I use only one adjective with auxiliary IS? I/he + am/is + adjective <paragraph> <pronounce>I/he</pronounce> <auxiliary>am/is</auxiliary> <adjective>...
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does anyone help me with the grammar structure of “XXX is likely to cause deaths, both proportionally and in absolute numbers.”

I appreciate any help you can provide. Which part is "both proportionally and in absolute numbers" modifying? Naturally, it should be "to cause," but here "to cause" is ...
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1answer
44 views

an adjective that makes condition “unbreakable”

I need an adjective that, when applied to the word "condition", makes that condition "unbreakable". In the text below the word "necessary" is used. Is there a better ...
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1answer
236 views

Is “closed” an adverb or adjective in “pinch your nose closed”?

It is helpful to pinch your nose closed when you have to swallow something that tastes yucky, like cough syrup. In this sentence, how should I understand the word "closed" is it adverb or ...
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1answer
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what's the meaning of early in this sentence?

Look at this sentence from a Toefl reading exam: Other researchers go even further, suggesting that the data provide evidence for large open expanses of water on the early Martian surface. Here the ...

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