Questions tagged [adjectives]

An adjective is a word that describes a noun. In English the adjective usually (but not always) precedes the noun it describes.

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2answers
64 views

Am I using the correct adjectives?

Am I using the correct adjectives and is this construction grammatically correct? It can also be characterized as a vertically dominated object. The idea is the object that I am focusing on can ...
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Idiomatic English expressions for “dead tired”, “soaking drunk”, “full packed”

I have a question about using pairs of adjectives in everyday English speech. Italian uses pairs of adjectives to emphasize a quality and some idiomatic and colloquial expressions are commonly ...
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“Due to expectedly inclement weather conditions…”

Does this sound okay? "Due to expectedly inclement weather conditions..." I am especially interested in the use of "expectedly."
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1answer
200 views

Is the structure of “a/an X kind of Y” correct? [closed]

Is this structure correct or not? An orange kind of morning is desired. Can I replace X with a noun like Europe,Japan,India etc. or not? For example: An India kind of morning is desired after ...
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Deep vs Deeply in the sentence?

Atlantic Ocean has a deeply/deep indented coast line which facilitates trading and other mercantile activities. My understanding says deeply would be the appropriate choice. But I'm not sure.
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What is the reason that the two adjectives are placed in a row?

"Barking," said Uncle Vernon, "howling mad, the lot of them.” (Harry Potter and the Sorcerer's Stone) ‘Howling’ and ‘mad’, all two are adjectives in dictionaries. What is the reason ...
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Comparing “the same ideas”, “two similar ideas” and “two same ideas”

I'm very surprised to get only one result for "two same ideas" on Google Books, especially because the result appears in a grammar book (Everyday Grammar by Irene Chong): Molly and Jimmy are good ...
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2answers
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Does the adjective “mute” apply to “Light”?

I learned the meaning of mute is "characterized by an absence of sound; quiet" from Oxford Dictionaries Online. From the above meaning I understand mute is an adjective or attribute which is ...
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3answers
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Comparing “atom bomb” & “atomic bomb” with “atom explosion” & “atomic explosion”

Merriam Webster says that "atom" is a noun, not an adjective, albeit there is the entry "atom bomb" in which, I think, "atom" is used as an adjective. Google Books has a lot of hits for "atom ...
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1answer
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Is 'causal' strictly needed in “… the most important 'causal' agents …”

1-. Salmonella is considered one of the most important causal agents of food-borne illness in developed countries. (US National Library of Medicine, National Institutes of Health) After having read ...
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May I use a phrasal verb as an adjective, like “commented out code”?

I'd like to express that some old code that has been commented out should be removed. May I phrase it as follows? Remove old, commented out code.
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Noun phrase as an adjective

This testimonial I accordingly received in about a month, forwarded a copy of it to Mrs. Fairfax, and got that lady’s reply, stating that she was satisfied, and fixing that day fortnight as the period ...
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Are there cases in which “empiric” and “empirical” are not interchangeable?

On stackoverflow.com I found 3 instances of empiric solution and 4 instances of empirical solution. What does this mean, if it means something—perhaps empiric and empirical are completely ...
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1answer
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How to express something that happens currently, but that might be fixed in the future?

I'm not sure if I wrote my sentence correctly: At the time the thesis is written, one current shortcoming of the proxy tables is that. I want to say, that currently, when I'm writing the thesis, ...
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Difference between “little” and “small”

Is there any obvious difference between little and small? A couple of examples: Big car vs. small (or little) car You have to pay just a small (or little) amount for such a wonderful item ...
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1answer
263 views

Can an adjective phrase include conjunction?

Probably, if I had lately left a good home and kind parents, this would have been the hour when I should most keenly have regretted the separation; that wind would then have saddened my heart; this ...
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Is this 'fun' an adjective or noun?

Playing tennis is a lot of fun. Is this a structure of [adjective: a lot of][noun: fun] or [adverb: a lot of][adjective: fun]?
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1answer
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Can we add “more” with an adjective to convert it into comparative degree? [duplicate]

We say "more beautiful" to refer to someone's beauty as being greater than another person's or other people's beauty. Here we use more because beautiful has no comparative form. When we deal with the ...
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1answer
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“is violative of” vs. “violate” [closed]

All forms of discrimination on grounds of gender is violative of fundamental freedoms and human rights. (LINK) Would a native of English language use is violative of, rather than "violate(s)", in the ...
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“I bought children books for my children” - is it grammatical?

Is it grammatical to use children as a possessive adjective in a phrase like this: I bought children books for my children If it's incorrect, what is the proper way to say the same, and is there ...
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Differences between “envious” & “jealous”

I am a little confused with them because sometimes they have been translated similar and sometimes different in my native tongue. For example please choose the best adjective for following situations: ...
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3answers
674 views

Why “buy a little happy” instead of “buy a little happiness”?

I came across the following sentence: Buy yourself a little happy. I don't understand why the adjective form happy is used instead of happiness.
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1answer
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By what name do you call this phrase starting with an adjective?

Fearful, however, of losing this first and only opportunity of relieving my grief by imparting it, I, after a disturbed pause, contrived to frame a meagre, though, as far as it went, true response. ...
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“bigger” vs. “more big”

As we know, comparatives compare two things. So, for example, we say that one thing is larger or more temperate than another thing. Now, let us consider the following examples. A. The African ...
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How to properly position adjectives

Sometimes I find myself in the position to describe something and of course making massive use of adjectives. Check out the following sentences, I would say, for example: three large red apples; ...
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Can I say that “his experiments are doubtful”?

I would like to express the fact that I don't have confidence in what a scientist has told me concerning an experiment he has led. Can I say that "his experiments are doubtful"?
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Wealthy and Rich, what's the difference

Is there any difference between someone being wealthy and someone being rich? For instance, is Bill Gates rich or wealthy? Or maybe he is both. I don't get the subtle difference if any.
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Noun used as an adjective in “passenger seat”?

A friend of mine (a native speaker of Japanese) wrote "passenger's seat", which a native speaker of English corrected to "passenger seat". Onelook.com has entries for the latter but not the former, ...
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When do “well” and “good” mean the same?

I know good normally is an adjective ("[object] is good"), and well is normally an adverb ("[activity] is performed well"). But quite a few times I've seen good used in place of well. For example, you ...
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“Despicable Me”: can “me” be used in such a way?

We know a movie named Despicable Me. I guess it means "I am despicable". But can me be used in such a way? For example, can I further say unavoidable me to mean "I am unavoidable"? Are there other ...

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