Questions tagged [adjuncts]

An adjunct is a part of a sentence which provides additional information to another part, but is not essential for its structure. E.g. 'in the park' in the sentence 'I saw you in the park'. Use this tag ONLY if the question is about an adjunct itself, not just because an adjunct appears in the sentence you have a question about.

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About connecting multiple noun adjuncts

This Wikipedia article states: Noun adjuncts can also be strung together in a longer sequence preceding the final noun, with each added noun modifying the noun which follows it, in effect creating ...
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Disjunct/Adjunct and the focus of cleft sentence

I generally don't follow the terminology and framework of A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (CGEL) by Quirk et al., rather I follow The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CaGEL). ...
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“Pieces of equipment” vs. “equipment pieces”

In the sentence: The detonator for a nuclear device may be made of_____: A) two pieces of equipment B) two equipment pieces I strongly feel that the correct option is A. But why? When should I use ...
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Order of noun adjuncts and adjectives

Is the term core common properties (of some objects) grammatical? The writer wants to address the common properties. From those, he is only interested in the core commonalities (whatever that means ...
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Can somebody explain the grammar of this sentence?

"Looking at the first and second stages of the process, there are three ways of collecting data." I saw this sentence in an IELTS diagram report but im not sure of the grammar. Do we have a reduced ...
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124 views

Using an article before a noun adjunct

I have an issue with putting articles in phrases like: "the equipment diagnostics and repair", "the equipment damage or breakage", "the Asset user’s explanation", "the asset damage or breakage causing"...
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“for a walk to the seashore” or “to the seashore for a walk”

Which of the following sentences is grammatically correct? Are both grammatically correct? I sometimes go out for a walk to the seashore. I sometimes go out to the seashore for a walk.
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Help to understand the structure: why before the needles returned, shredding my thoughts

I AWOKE WITH NEEDLES in my brain. Thousands of them, biting, blocking out everything. Then they disappeared for one dizzying moment and I got my bearings. It was morning, early; amber sunlight poured ...
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the icing on the cake: Is 'on the cake' an adjunct or complement?

It's the icing on the cake. Here, is on the cake an adjunct or a complement of the noun icing?
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250 views

Plural or singular noun adjunct?

Wikipedia says: Noun adjuncts were traditionally mostly singular (e.g. "trouser press") except when there were lexical restrictions (e.g. "arms race"), but there is a recent trend towards more use ...
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Is this to-infinitive clause an adjunct or a complement?

He'll keep his pledge to donate 10,000 mosquito nets to charity to help fight Malaria in Africa. In this sentence, is the to-infinitive in bold a complement or an adjunct of purpose? Perhaps more ...
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SPEND [a period of time] ENGAGED/ENGAGING in something

I came across the following sentence in the book - ORIGIN - written by Dan Brown Since 1893, hundreds of spiritual leaders from nearly thirty world religions had gathered in a different location ...
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“Did I hear that correctly?” or “Did I hear that correct?” Which one is correct?

This is a conversation in the film "A Wish for Christmas", you can download its subtitle on the internet The boss is talking on the phone: Boss: Frankly, the way things are going, Christmas is ...
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Confused “Complements and adjuncts” in these sentences “Did I hear this correct?” & “Am I reading this right?”

Source Complements and adjuncts are different. A complement is necessary in order to complete the meaning. An adjunct is not necessary, and adds extra information. Compare He put the cake ...
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Which form is correct if a child won't go to school today because he has an appointment?

He won't go today to school because he has an appointment. or He won't go to school today because he has an appointment.
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How can I differentiate the words?

How can I differentiate the words a big chocolate-chipped pie ㅡ a pie that has big chocolate chips ㅡ and a big chocolate-chipped pie ㅡ a big pie that has chocolate chips.
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…waited until recently…[Is 'until recently' a complement of 'waited'?]

This article says in part: Though the White House first announced his nomination in April, lobbyists waited until recently to begin publicly mounting an aggressive opposition effort. Is 'until ...
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“I cut it by hand” - what is “by hand”? (Grammatically)

I cut it by hand. Does it (vaguely) make sense to call it a transitive verb?
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Is “chicken” a modifier in “chicken soup”?

Wikipedia says "chicken" is an adjunct which modifies the head noun "soup." But I think this analysis is a little bit weird. How could it be modifying "soup"? "Chicken" doesn't seem to be describing ...
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Adjuncts in front position: Do they provide the reason behind the main clause's action?

I'm having an argument with a friend about the role of predicative adjuncts in front position and whether they modify the reason behind the action in the main clause. Examples: "Tired and sleepy, she ...
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“Someone was refreshingly honest when […]”: is the adverb an obfuscated adjunct?

Please consider the following: (1) My colleague was refreshingly honest when I asked her for feedback. (2) It was refreshing to see my colleague being honest when I asked her for feedback. (3)...
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Is this a modifier in this sentence?

Perhaps most far reaching, California is prepared to expose the extent to which low-wage employers get a free ride on taxpayers. In this sentence, is 'perhaps most far reaching' is a modifier? If so,...
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(In) no way? - She will agree to you leaving early in no way

A manner adjunct - (in) no way. It can move freely in a sentence. (In) no way will she agree to you leaving early. But when (in) no way change its position, we can't drop in. She will agree ...
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Is there any difference between these two sentences

Is there any difference between these two sentences: He explained to her what he meant. He explained what he meant to her. I feel 'what he meant' should be treated as the ...
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Use a plural noun to describe a second one

I want to explain char *szArray[], it denotes : In singular noun, an array of which each element is a pointer to a zero-terminated string. In plural noun, an array whose all elements are pointers to ...
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What's “A Slave” in “12 Years A Slave”?

A grammatical analysis of the title for the movie "12 Years A Slave" has baffled me. Particularly the fact that possibly some kind of inversion (A Slave for 12 Years ⟶ 12 Years A Slave) has taken ...
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“Of that time” vs “at that time”

The following is a sentence from the wikipedia page on Drexel Burnham Lambert's early history. However, the company's ability to expand was limited by the structure of the investment banking ...
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Placement of “with” before an absolute clause

Normally, there is a selection in advance of a raising cam, with each feeder course being associated with a particular selection device. This sentence has been chosen from "Knitting Technology" by ...
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In this sentence, who are sitting on the bench?

Consider: She spoke with him sitting on a bench. I think it is likely to mean she is sitting on the bench or he is sitting on the bench. So, I wonder if there is a way to eliminate this ...
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337 views

How can I correctly form collocations such as 'cough trouble'?

I read a new collocation cough trouble which I could not found in any dictionary. How can I form a noun + noun collocation?
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“crying remember” or “remember crying”? — “One day, you will ______ my words!”

Let say that someone is not listening to your advise which is for his/her benefit and making a big mistake. So can he say: One day, you will crying remember my words! Or  One day, you will ...
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“They each tells a story.”

Which one is correct: They each tells a story. or They each tell a story. Does "each" change the plural form of the verb? Thanks.
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The body's cells or The body cells?

I'm not native English speaker and I'm confused about the two following options: Should I use the possessive apostrophe or not? Option no.1: They help in carrying oxygen to the body's cells. Option ...
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“They have *both* got …” or “They *both* have got …”

So I had to check my friend's homework, but I myself don't even know the answers. For instance: "Yes, they are. They are both tall and they have both got brown eyes. "Yes, they are. They are ...
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“bullied as a kid” vs “bullied in your childhood” - any difference?

Do following sentences imply same thing and Is there anything wrong with the first one? 1) Were you bullied as a kid? 2) Were you bullied in your childhood?
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The fire demon won't bend down his head to be cooked on

“I can cook,” said Sophie. “Unhook that frying pan and I’ll show you.” “She reached for the large black pan hanging on the closet wall, in spite of Michael trying to prevent her. “You don’t ...
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Does the sentence “To get back to the main point, the budget needs to be bigger” make sense to you?

To get back to the main point, the budget needs to be bigger.(cited from https://www.noslangues-ourlanguages.gc.ca/bien-well/fra-eng/grammaire-grammar/absolu-absolute-eng.html) Does this sentence ...
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859 views

stand your way; stand in your way

(I don't want to?) stand your way I think I might be remembering what I'd heard on the educational local radio while driving, but those three words are all I can remember. When I heard them, ‘your ...
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The sun rises “east.”

The sun rises “east.” “East” can have this meaning: “in the east.” Then can the sentence above be used?
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What is this grammatical structure called?

I noticed that there is sentence construct that starts with an adjective, something like this: Ready to race, John started the car. John, ready to race, started the car. I looked at some ...
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she greeted me 'warm'

She greeted me warm. In ‘He died young,’ young is added as predicative adjunct. Likewise, can the sentence, ‘she greeted me warm,’ be used: ‘warm’ is the predicative adjunct for ‘she’?
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Fire engine red paint

Unlike HTML, which reveals itself in flashy text and graphics, XML is more of an under-the-hood kind of technology. If HTML is the fire engine red paint and supple leather interior of a sports car, ...
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Julian Assange walks out a free man

Julian Assange plans to walk out of Ecuador’s embassy a free man, avoiding arrest and extradition to Sweden to face questioning about sexual assault and rape allegations. (The Age) ‘A free man’ gives ...
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Differences between adverb phrase, adverbial and adjunct

I'm trying to learn more about grammar and often come across these terms. Not sure the differences.
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How to analyse/decompose 'where this would otherwise lead to an unjust result'?

Source: p 102, How the Law Works, by Gary Slapper With so many rules and slightly different interpretations of them in thousands of cases, it is not always easy to see which interpretation of the ...
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this where and that where

[i] Well, as we reported earlier the chief executive of the Dutch airport where the flight departed says 27 Australians were on board. (ABC news) [ii] There was where Vadinho used to sit on the wall,...
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Could this word, there, be read both adjective and adverb?

i) What’s that over there? ii) People can take their pets there. iii) I believe one of the boys there thinks I'm pretty. (All three are from COCA) iv) Let’s go and see the pets there. Does there ...
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Confusion about adjunct and complement

In my recently concluded test, I was asked to identify the sentence pattern of this sentence: It stands tall I split it as: It | stands | tall S V A For me, "tall" is an additional ...
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In 'book a table for two', can 'for two' be interpreted as an adjunct?

[i] Inside, a room had been turned into a grotto with a table for two … (COCA) [ii] He takes a seat at a table for two… (COCA) [iii] I'd like to book a table for two. (Naver.com) In the first ...
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Is this, something terrible, a predicative adjunct?

"I guess Gilbert Blythe will be in school today," said Diana. "He's been visiting his cousins over in New Brunswick all summer and he only came home Saturday night. He's AW'FLY handsome, Anne. And he ...