Questions tagged [adverbial-phrases]

Adverbial phrase (also known as adverb phrase) is a term for two or more words functions adverbially (i.e. as an adverb).

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The usage of “but” in a sentence

Please take a look at this passage: It is due to a misunderstanding that most modern sculptures are monochromatic. When ancient sculptures were exhumed years ago, they were discovered to be uncolored....
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Is this phrase an adverbial phrase modifying the verb “competed”?

I competed in the marathon, not because I wanted to... Is "not because I wanted to" an adverbial phrase that modifies the verb "competed"?
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Is “without” a preposition or an adverb in “Without thinking where I was going”? Lexical word or grammatical word?

I'm doing my English homework and I have this doubt so I would appreciate your help. I need to know whether "without" is a preposition or an adverb in this specific sentence in order to ...
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Is this a correct analysis of an adverbial prepositional phrase?

I am trying to analyse what I judge a compound sentence with an adverbial phrase (in italics) placed at the beginning: In what turned out to be a common experience for many people who tried to create ...
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Plurals: “As matters of fact”, “As matter of facts”, and “As matters of facts” which one(s) when? if any?

I am wondering which one is correct or when/where one should use them: As matters of facts, A did X and B did Y. As matters of fact, A did X and B did Y. As matter of facts, A did X and B did Y. I ...
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no later than ~ VS by no later than ~

I am familiar with "no later than"". However, I have seen "by no later than". As far as I know, "no later than" has meaning as follows. ​by a particular time and ...
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Question About adveral clause

The things as they are expected to help us, As sentence above, I heard that 'as clause' is a adverbal clause, but I want to know that what someone said is right, that is, This adverbal clause modifies ...
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Conditionals and adverb clauses

(1) If I ate too much food now, I wouldn't be able to eat anything else when my pizza arrives in 30 minutes. Is the arrives correct here? (2) If I didn't sleep now, I would look terrible when I go ...
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What's the problem with “Colonization hundreds of years ago is held accountable for such situation”?

I wrote the following sentence. Colonization hundreds of years ago is held accountable for such situation. I think I have used "hundreds of years ago" as a modifier of "colonization&...
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Adverbial modifier after than?

I read a sentence as follows from a book by a Harvard professor(born in the U.S.A.): Despite the fact that farming required more strenuous physical exertion than most urban jobs, the rural grain ...
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Does “right upstairs” mean “on the floor directly above”?

Background This line from Monk: Mr. Monk Makes a Friend (2007) motivates this question. Adrian Monk says this just outside his home to a friend of his. Come on, I live right upstairs. Just from this,...
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My question is about adverb aspect of 'hard' [closed]

Is it okay to say: the driver was driving hard because the weather was dark. Or do we say: the weather was hard dark so the driver couldn't see a thing.
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Can a noun clause be part of an adverbial phrase?

For example: "He was punished for what he did to his brother."
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Surprisingly enough vs very surprisingly

I am not a native speaker of english language but I have noted that surprisingly enough is used more often than very surprisingly. What is the real difference between two? Enough and very both are ...
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2answers
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The police questioned everyone in the room. Here “in the room” is an adjective phrase or an adverb phrase

The police questioned everyone in the room. Here "in the room" is an adjective phrase or an adverb phrase I think it is an adverb phrase.But some of the teachers of our country think it an ...
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Sentences containing “refused to close his bar because”

a. He refused to close his bar because of the pandemic. b. He refused to close his bar because there was a pandemic. Are the above sentences grammatically correct, and do they make sense? The intended ...
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modificational scope of “two years ago”

In the following sentence, does the "two years ago" describe the time of buying or reading the book? I bought the book which I had read two years ago and which had the author's autograph. ...
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Usage of Could vs Usage of Can

He goes to Delhi every week so that he could see his Mother. My friends and people here said that it’s wrong and we should use “can” instead of could, as “could” is used in past forms and the given ...
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Meaning of 'All-out brawl'?

I know the meaning of 'brawl'.But what does this phrase 'all-out brawl' mean? Thanks in Advance.
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Interpretation of adverbial phrases

“Shut up,” said the man with the gun in her face. Here are my interpretations of this sentence. the man who has the gun said "shut up" to her directly. the man while aiming the gun to her ...
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2answers
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'prevent from willing participating' or 'prevent from willingly participating'?

'prevent from willing participating' or 'prevent from willingly participating'? For example: His active vocabulary is rather limited, but this doesn’t prevent him from willingly participating in ...
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1answer
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too and either usage differences

A: I don't like oranges. B: I don't like oranges either. This is the right way to express this idea. question 1: But why can't it be written like this: B: I too don't like oranges. question ...
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1answer
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Can 'hardly' convey two opposite meanings based on its location in a sentence?

Is there a semantic difference between these two sentences? I defended the case quite hardly. vs. I hardly defended the case. For my understanding, these two sentences have an opposite ...
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How could you divide this sentence with 'all (bare noun-phrase adverb)' into two sentences?

If it ever was true, does the possibility even exist for it to be true today? At your age, can anyone still influence you in a bad way? Or have you been influenced all you can ever be influenced, ...
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2answers
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Can this prepositional phrase be considered an adverbial phrase?

In this sentence: "Tom is playing God of War at Tim's house." The prepositional phrase "at Tim's house" works as an adverbial phrase?
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“It was nice meeting you or it was nice talking to you”, What's the grammar?

I'm not sure about this thing, but it has been tormenting me for a while. I can't really understand the grammatical structure of it was nice meeting you. I mean, if nice in itself is an adjective, ...
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Use of tautology

I have read a sentence that SHOCKED me if it is correct. In the sentence I read the verb 'waste' preceding the adverb 'needlessly'. Can anything be wasted under a need? Does the adverb 'needlessly' ...
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Is the phrase “one too many times” an adverb? If it is, what kind of adverb is it?

If "one too many times" is an adverb What kind of adveb is "one too many times"?
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1answer
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for long vs. for a long time

I have not heard from him for long or for a long time. Can I use for long and for a long time in the above sentence interchangeably? Or do these phrases have different meaning and usage?
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Is there a difference in meanig between “as someone told you to” and “as someone told you”

a. You didn't come home late last night, as your Dad told you to. b. You didn't come home late last night, as your Dad told you. Do these mean: Your Dad told you to come home late last ...
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Can you explain me why?

I'm studying english now and something confused my mind. Question; "On average, the Japanese car companies are ........ ones in the world market. A) the most productive B) more productive I ...
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so that… usage

1) You must carry on so that you will succeed 2)You must carry on so that you may succeed 3)You must carry on so that you can succeed My grammar book is saying that sentence1 is wrong and ...
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Adverb clause of comparision

example1: “He is wiser that I” example2: “He is wiser than me”. I know example1 is correct and example2 is grammatically wrong. But please check the below conditions Sentence1: “I found her ...
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“winning the lottery” vs “having won the lottery” vs “with/by winning the lottery”

I am working with clauses with adverbial meaning, and here is my sentence: Were I to win the lottery, I would have all (of) that money spent fast. Keep in mind that I have to express condition. ...
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Can I use almost and job together?

My question, as I said in the title, is that can I use almost and job together? For example, is the sentence below correct (meaning and place of almost)? Unfortunately, there is almost no job ...
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1answer
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Man, it's not easy to decide

I'd love to hear your opinions. Please tell me which one is correct or incorrect. the original sentence: You all must have played this game at least once. You don't have to take specific context into ...
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the early months

In the first few months**,** when he stayed at the hotel, he went to restaurants a lot. In the first few months when he stayed at the hotel, he went to restaurants a lot. In the early months**,** ...
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Ajective and Adverb grammar

adjectives followed by prepositional phrases.Is it adjectives or adverbs ? Example: He is afraid of rats. She is scared of cats. Are both "of rats " and "of cats" adverb prepositional phrases?
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as if in a superhero movie/as in a superhero movie

a. Those kids were talking as in gangster movies. b. Those kids were talking as if in a gangster movie. (Meaning: They were talking the way they do in gangster movies.) =============================...
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is it correct to say “at the lessons”?

Many Russian textbooks use the adverbial "at the lessons" meaning that something takes place during some lessons/classes. For example: "Children call each other names at the lessons". I heard that ...
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Which type of adverbial is “ about this policy”?

“I will think again about this policy.” In my view, “about this policy” is a preposition phrase, functioning as an adverbial. But I don’t know which type of adverbial this phrase is.
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Is “ located on the upper side than…” understandable?

It should be located above the line. For some reasons, I need to rephrase the sentence above using "upper side". My drafts are as follows: It should be located on the upper side than the line. ...
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Sentence starting with a prepositional phrase

This is from a TOEFL practice book: Of all the lawsuits in the world, _____ in US courts. A. Filed 95 percent of them B. 95 percent of them are filed C. That filed are 95 percent of them D. Which ...
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Easier accessible?

Is it correct to say “It is easier accessible”? I think the correct way is to say “It is accessible more easily” or “It is easier to access something”. I think that we cannot describe an ...
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Is there an adverb like “in during”, for a meaning similar to “on the way”?

I am inclined to use the phrase "in during" to end some of my sentences. Here's an example: I was headed to the library, and I've talked with my mom on the phone in during. Does this phrase exist? ...
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Is “every bit” an adverb?

I found out 'every bit' is similar expression to 'entirely' while reading through another post put up on here. So in this line (from the movie 'Dead poets society' Source:Yarn Clips): "It's every ...
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60 views

Using “get to” rather than “arrive at”?

Is this a grammatically and syntactically correct sentence? When you have got to at home you have to get on with the work straight away. I want to say when a person arrived at home he has to ...
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Can this clause function as an adverbial of reason?

I couldn’t analyse the structure of this sentence properly. Specifically, i don’t know what is the function of the clause “over giving weighting factor to the role of youngsters.” This is the whole ...
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Analyzing “This was the long way, which we had to go”

This was the long way, which we had to go. I think this sentence is grammatically correct and which is referring to the long way and there is no need to use that to restrict the long way because as ...
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Do you consider them as parenthetical phrases or adverbial phrases?

We, for our part, admitting the fact that no feat of intelligence and character is so exacting as that required of two people who desire to live permanently together on a basis of amity, are ...

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