Questions tagged [adverbial-phrases]

Adverbial phrase (also known as adverb phrase) is a term for two or more words functions adverbially (i.e. as an adverb).

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1answer
33 views

How to analyze this sentence, 'He apologised to me for that.'?

'He apologised to me for that.' I know that 'he' is the subject and 'apologised' the verb but I don't know about the rest.
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Can we place an adverbial prepositional phrase before a verb?

This led to the creation of their trademark bricks, which were at the time referred to as 'Automatic Binding Bricks.' Traditionally, it is said that adverbs can be positioned at the beginning, middle,...
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Comma before adverbial phrase at end of sentence

I am using a grammar software and it constantly tells me to use commas before what I think is an adverbial phrase at the end of a sentence (and thus is not predceded by a comme). An example: "...
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Do these sentences have the same meaning? 1) "That is what I said." 2) "I said it, too."

The following sentences seem to have the same meaning? 1-"That is what I said." 2-"I said it, too." For instance; The boss says to an employee: You should not smoke here. It is ...
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What is the right punctuation when the object clause has an adverbial clause of reason?

What is the right punctuation when the object clause has an adverbial clause of reason? The example is as follows. The intuition is that, since A is right, B is right. Some alternatives: The ...
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How to tell if adverb clauses are essential or not?

"Essential clauses provide essential information and are not set off with commas." "Non-essential clauses provide additional, non-essential information and need commas." It seems ...
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16 views

was careful to straighten / carefully straightened

Could you please explain what's the difference in their meaning/emphasis? He was careful to straighten his room before leaving. He carefully straightened his room before leaving.
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23 views

out of anger/ because of my anger

a. I said that because of anger. b. I said that because of my anger. ========================= c. I said that out of anger. d. I said that out of my anger. Which of the above sentences are ...
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65 views

to-infinitival clause expressing a manner

Experts say the drowsiness many of us feel during the day may not be because we had too little sleep at night, but because we need an early afternoon nap. Humans were made to sleep not once, but twice,...
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Conditionals and adverb clauses

(1) If I ate too much food now, I wouldn't be able to eat anything else when my pizza arrives in 30 minutes. Is the arrives correct here? (2) If I didn't sleep now, I would look terrible when I go ...
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Is "every bit" an adverb?

I found out 'every bit' is similar expression to 'entirely' while reading through another post put up on here. So in this line (from the movie 'Dead poets society' Source:Yarn Clips): "It's every ...
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Usage of "comparative + Than" as an adverb

In a formal writing, can the sentence: I became more interested in mathematics than physics. be rephrased as: I became interested in mathematics more than physics. Do they both have the same ...
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Which of "almost don't talk to each other" or "almost never talk to each other" is correct?

a. My sons almost don't talk to each other. b. My sons almost never talk to each other. Are both of the above sentences grammatically correct and do they mean the same? I use (b). (a) sounds a bit ...
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107 views

position of adverbial phrase in sentence

Using of placement of adverb, manner, place, and time in sentence. I am a bit confused speaking to place them in sentence. While speaking with my boss: I went to Ram's home, I connected my ...
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2answers
35 views

"A way" or "any way" , what is correct?

What of these is correct? and if both are correct, what is there any difference or connotation in the meaning? or, are there different in terms of formality? Is there a way you could send me the ...
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1answer
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"It was nice meeting you or it was nice talking to you", What's the grammar?

I'm not sure about this thing, but it has been tormenting me for a while. I can't really understand the grammatical structure of it was nice meeting you. I mean, if nice in itself is an adjective, ...
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1answer
73 views

Present Continuous with Adverbial Clauses

I heard present continuous is also used for temporary events which must not be happen in the same time with 'saying' but the first sentence below sounds wrong to me , even leaving work when he starts ...
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1answer
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Is there a rule for using adverbial clauses/phrases directly after conjunctions?

I went to the park because I needed to clear my head, and when it was morning, I returned home. In this sentence, we see two subordinate clauses and two independent clauses. The two subordinate ...
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as adjective as to infinitive or as adjective to infinitive as

Older workers can be as adaptable and quick to learn as anyone else. This sentence is from Oxford Advance Learner Dictionary. I wanted to know whether I can change this sentence as follow. Older ...
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What is the function of ‘before clause’ in the sentence?

When I was reading the book The Giver, I read the following sentences. There was a time, actually—you’ll see this in the memories later—when flesh was many different colors. That was before we ...
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35 views

Is there a difference in meanig between "as someone told you to" and "as someone told you"

a. You didn't come home late last night, as your Dad told you to. b. You didn't come home late last night, as your Dad told you. Do these mean: Your Dad told you to come home late last ...
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1answer
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Is this prepositional phrase adjective or adverb?

Is this prepositional phrase "with same sex quickstep" an adjective describing "history" or adverb modifying "makes in the sentence below? Andrew Makes ‘Dancing With The ...
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occasionally vs every once in a while

Following Phrase meaning: every now and then vs every once in a while, what's the difference between "occasionally" and "every once in a while" in formal writing? E.g.: Occasionally, I ask the ...
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A phrase function : adverb phrase or adjective phrase

In text book, there is a sentence which I can't analyze. She's very conventional in her views. Is a preposition phrase(in her views) an adverb phrase or an adjective phrase? , Or does it function a ...
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difference between an adjective phrase and an adverbial phrase

In a web-site, I happen upon a sentence I can’t understand grammatically. Famished from the journey, John decided to hunker down with his horse. They mark that a front part is an adjective phrase. I ...
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Is the prepositional phrase an adverbial or adjective phrase

In the sentence quoted below are the prepositions "for 2021" and "without latest software" acting as an adjective or adverb? "Fossil announces new smartwatches for 2021 ...
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Telic /atelic verb phrases

What is the best way to identify the verb phrase as telic/atelic apart from adding durational adverbials(such as in-adverbial and for-adverbial) and using such lexical verbs as stop/finish?
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H independent or independently sorted?

I read these two sentences: Such an array is said to be h-sorted. Put another way, an h-sorted array is h independent sorted sub-sequences, interleaved together. I don't know the grammar behind ...
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“Don’t jump on the couch.” Ambiguity

Can “don’t jump on the couch” mean “don’t jump off the couch,” or does it only mean “don’t jump onto the couch”? How to recommend someone be on the couch and then jump? I think there’s no word like “...
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Adverbial prepositional phrase order

“I ate too much in the restaurant.” “I ate in the restaurant too much.” Is there a difference between them? “too much” and “in the restaurant” are both adverbial.
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How Is This A subordinate Clause?

The instructor said that the sentence below contains a subordinate clause ("... if only for financial reasons."), but I feel that what is being called a 'subordinate clause,' is just a ...
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2answers
52 views

Can an adverbial clause modify only a verb?

Can an adverbial clause modify only a verb? Down below, words in bold are verbs modified. Italic clauses are clauses modifying the verbs Example 1, Getting bullied because he was shorter was ...
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Using “in between” as an adverb

Can we use “in between” when talking about something between two things when those two things are not specified? Example: Let’s say I am watching this video with a friend of mine. Can I say, “The cat ...
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The usage of "at intervals"

The ponds are linked with each by waterfalls at intervals from higher terraces to the lower ones. The sentence is a translation from Chinese to English describing a huge pond formed by several ...
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1answer
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<very well above>, <so well above>, <so much above>

Are the phrases “very well above,” “so well above,” and “so much above” correct? Example sentences: The bridge is very well above us. The bridge is so well above us! The bridge is so much above us! ...
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The position of "such as Google, Facebook, and Instagram"

I'd like to learn what places fit "such as Google, Facebook, and Instagram" in the following sentence. The internet brought new applications into our lives such as Google, Facebook, and ...
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Why can “bigly” or “big league” become a confusing question?Do they belong to the same part of speech?

I've read quite some news about one of D J Trump's frequently used word, bigly/big league. During the first debate, he used the expression while speaking about taxes. “I’m going to cut taxes [...
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Can these questions be answered with these answers?

I am trying to reach the question form by going through its standard sentence form. In my native language, Turkish, The question form of I'm talking about the money that is for your education = I'm ...
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What does "On what subject did you conduct studies?" exactly ask about?

I know that a question can directly be related to a verb. However, can it refer to a noun rather than the verb? For example; On what subject did you conduct studies? I think that this question can ...
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Is it possible to use “next” between subject and verb?

When we next see Alex and Max, who are presently parents of two children, they will have had a new baby in their family. Source: English Grammar Digest by Trudy Aronson. I know Only a few adverbs of ...
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position of "Addressing concerns over the impact of the release"

What's the difference between the following sentences? Suppose the sentence occurs in the third paragraph of a news report, and the first paragraph mentions the decision faces opposition from home and ...
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26 views

The usage of "but" in a sentence

Please take a look at this passage: It is due to a misunderstanding that most modern sculptures are monochromatic. When ancient sculptures were exhumed years ago, they were discovered to be uncolored....
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Can "direction" have sides?

I am trying to describe the positional relationship among objects A, B, and C with reference to direction X. The relationship may be described as follows when it is literally translated from my ...
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Is this phrase an adverbial phrase modifying the verb “competed”?

I competed in the marathon, not because I wanted to... Is "not because I wanted to" an adverbial phrase that modifies the verb "competed"?
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Is "without" a preposition or an adverb in "Without thinking where I was going"? Lexical word or grammatical word?

I'm doing my English homework and I have this doubt so I would appreciate your help. I need to know whether "without" is a preposition or an adverb in this specific sentence in order to ...
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Does "right upstairs" mean "on the floor directly above"?

Background This line from Monk: Mr. Monk Makes a Friend (2007) motivates this question. Adrian Monk says this just outside his home to a friend of his. Come on, I live right upstairs. Just from this,...
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"in the morning" could mean "tomorrow morning", but what about "in the afternoon / evening"?

This site says: If something will happen during the morning of the next day, you can say that it will happen tomorrow morning or in the morning. I've got to go to work tomorrow morning = I'...
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Does the second paragraph convey the intended meaning? If not, how can I rewrite it?

The Qinghai Tibet Railway, the highest in the world, begins operation on Saturday. The first train will leave Golmud, the second largest city of Qinghai Province in Northwest China, for Lhasa, ...
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Is this a correct analysis of an adverbial prepositional phrase?

I am trying to analyse what I judge a compound sentence with an adverbial phrase (in italics) placed at the beginning: In what turned out to be a common experience for many people who tried to create ...
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Plurals: "As matters of fact", "As matter of facts", and "As matters of facts" which one(s) when? if any?

I am wondering which one is correct or when/where one should use them: As matters of facts, A did X and B did Y. As matters of fact, A did X and B did Y. As matter of facts, A did X and B did Y. I ...

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