Questions tagged [adverbial-phrases]

Adverbial phrase (also known as adverb phrase) is a term for two or more words functions adverbially (i.e. as an adverb).

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24
votes
3answers
185k views

"at which time" vs. "at what time"

I am confused with the grammar here. Which is grammatically correct? At which time will you call me? At what time will you call me? And why?
19
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6answers
3k views

Sentences containing "refused to close his bar because"

a. He refused to close his bar because of the pandemic. b. He refused to close his bar because there was a pandemic. Are the above sentences grammatically correct, and do they make sense? The intended ...
15
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8answers
4k views

Introductory word meaning "considering what was previously said"

Is there an introductory word or phrase which means considering what was said? German-made parts are way too expensive. Taking it into consideration, we ordered Chinese ones.
8
votes
1answer
306 views

How to express something that happens currently, but that might be fixed in the future?

I'm not sure if I wrote my sentence correctly: At the time the thesis is written, one current shortcoming of the proxy tables is that. I want to say, that currently, when I'm writing the thesis, ...
7
votes
5answers
1k views

Which of "almost don't talk to each other" or "almost never talk to each other" is correct?

a. My sons almost don't talk to each other. b. My sons almost never talk to each other. Are both of the above sentences grammatically correct and do they mean the same? I use (b). (a) sounds a bit ...
7
votes
3answers
5k views

Usage of 'quick' as adverb

I heard the following dialog in a British English movie: Words go round quick. All the little tongues go clack, clack, clack. What does this mean, and why was the word "quick" used instead of "...
7
votes
1answer
49k views

What is the meaning of "for many years to come" in this sentence?

The Bilingual Education Act is clearly a work-in-progress, and related issues are likely to be found in the media and on the ballots for many years to come. There's one main clause, in skeleton ...
7
votes
4answers
42k views

"many times" or "for many times"?

I have been struggling whether or not using "for" in front of "many times". Some explanations on the internet say "for many times" is British English and "many times&...
7
votes
5answers
617 views

ambiguity?: to infinitive phrase as a purpose clause or an infinitival relative clause

I think the grammar of To-infinitive is the most difficult part of learning English because it is hard for me like ESL students to know which is which. I mean, I'm, well, just wanting to classify the ...
6
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4answers
441 views

What is the sentence structure of the sentence?

At that time I had a much-petted, much-abused doll, which I afterward named Nancy. She was, alas, the helpless victim of my outbursts of temper and of affection, so that she became much the worse ...
6
votes
3answers
913 views

Can the subject be an adjective phrase, adverb phrase, or a bare infinitival clause?

This is an exercise in Chapter 5 of a textbook by Bas Aarts, English Syntax and Argumentation, 4th edition, published 2013, on page 88: In previous editions of this book I allowed for adjective ...
5
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2answers
58k views

Early vs Earlier

Imagine you are organizing a lunch and want to ask someone (your friend or sister, etc.) to come over and help you prepare the meal. Which one of the following words works properly in the self-made ...
5
votes
1answer
323 views

About adverbial phrase

"She is at the point of her death." Here, 'at the point of her death' is said to be an adverbial phrase by the textbook which modifies the finite verb 'is'. But I thought it is an adjective phrase ...
4
votes
2answers
5k views

Never believe anything you hear at a woman's tit

I'm reading the novel "The Game of Thrones" by George R.R. Martin, and I found this sentence: Royce replied. “Never believe anything you hear at a woman's tit." Does the sentence mean that: ...
4
votes
1answer
256 views

Can we use adverb phrase with conjunction plus noun phrase?

I could not remember him; but I knew that he was my own uncle—my mother’s brother—that he had taken me when a parentless infant to his house; and that in his last moments he had required a promise ...
4
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1answer
60 views

“Friday I am in love” or “On Friday I am in love”?

The question itself is wider. If I am not mistaken, putting “Friday” in the song title by the Cure means “On Friday”. Can we use it everyday and not only with days of the week but other time markers, ...
4
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1answer
69 views

Interpretation of adverbial clauses meaning time or condition, such as when, if

I'm learning English with text books, and one of them says tenses of adverbial clauses which means time or condition(such as when-clause or if-clause) depend on the main clauses to which they are ...
4
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1answer
55 views

Adverbial position

I've found a newspaper caption reading: They organised on Monday a meeting. I would have expected the caption to be They organised a meeting on Monday. Which one of the above is correct?
4
votes
1answer
232 views

What grammatical function do down and nearly serve in the following sentence?

What grammatical function do "down" and "nearly" function as in the following sentence? Sales of our best-sellers are down nearly 10 percent. I believe that down functions as an adjective and nearly ...
3
votes
2answers
4k views

How to identify the adverbials in a phrase?

I'm trying to help my daughter with her grammar homework. She has two phrases where she needs to identify (underline) the adverbials. The sentences are: My friend Zainab went skiing last week. ...
3
votes
2answers
18k views

Passive sentences: placing an adverbial before or after the agent

This homework was done by Vasya at school. Or This homework was done at school by Vasya. Are both sentences grammatical? Is it okay to put the adverbial at school either before or after the ...
3
votes
1answer
715 views

"In his ear" - preposition phrase or adverbial phrase?

In his ear, he whispers gaily. Is "in his ear" a prepositional or an adverbial phrase? Please explain your choice and give some reasons for your answer. Thanks!
3
votes
2answers
180 views

Is the phrase "back to the Muggle world" an adjective or adverbial one?

People jostled them as they moved forward toward the gateway back to the Muggle world. (Harry Potter) Is the phrase "back to the Muggle world" an adjective or adverbial one?
3
votes
4answers
819 views

When clause; adverbial of time

I hope you can help me with these sentences: It must have been pretty tough when you started a business When you started a business must have been pretty tough. I know sentence 1 can be used ...
3
votes
2answers
37k views

phrases like on my own, by myself, and alone

I have collected the followings from various sources as your site. I would like to study them accurately. so, would you tell me, if they are right, if so, would you add them what you think of I ...
3
votes
3answers
461 views

Why can “bigly” or “big league” become a confusing question?Do they belong to the same part of speech?

I've read quite some news about one of D J Trump's frequently used word, bigly/big league. During the first debate, he used the expression while speaking about taxes. “I’m going to cut taxes [...
3
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1answer
82 views

How to analyse/decompose 'where this would otherwise lead to an unjust result'?

Source: p 102, How the Law Works, by Gary Slapper With so many rules and slightly different interpretations of them in thousands of cases, it is not always easy to see which interpretation of the ...
3
votes
3answers
511 views

adverb phrase or adjective phrase

You can take a short ferry ride from the city of Surabaya to Madura for a heart-stopping bull race, filled with excitement. In the sentence, is the phrase "filled with excitement" adverb phrase or ...
3
votes
2answers
472 views

Adverbial phrase or Adjectival phrase?

I was reading a text on archaeology came across with: Often these objects lie buried in the ground, so our image of the archaeologist is of a scientist who is always digging. I think buried in the ...
3
votes
1answer
310 views

We are seven minutes in. No score yet

While watching a football game, "We are seven minutes in. No score yet." What does "seven minutes in" mean? And what does it mean by "in"?
3
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1answer
748 views

It took two hours for her to finish her homework

It took her two hours to finish her homework. It took two hours for her to finish her homework. Q: I know #1 is correct and I guess #2 is also correct/natural. What is your opinion?
3
votes
1answer
643 views

"In spite of there being danger signs" or "in spite of the danger signs" or "In spite of danger signs, they were swimming."

Although there were danger signs,they were swimming. If I change this sentence into "In spite of structure": In spite of there being danger signs, they were swimming. In spite of the danger ...
3
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1answer
2k views

"the way" vs "in the way"

They don't write songs the way they used to. It's amazing the way she manages to stay calm. The way he was yelling, you'd have thought he was badly hurt. I love you the way you are. ...
3
votes
2answers
311 views

What does "a value that lies z or more standard deviations above the expected value" mean?

This phrase came from the book Understanding Probability written by Henk Tijms. The original sentence is: the probability that a normally distributed random variable will take on a value that lies ...
3
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2answers
4k views

Differences between adverb phrase, adverbial and adjunct

I'm trying to learn more about grammar and often come across these terms. Not sure the differences.
3
votes
2answers
117 views

Does "right upstairs" mean "on the floor directly above"?

Background This line from Monk: Mr. Monk Makes a Friend (2007) motivates this question. Adrian Monk says this just outside his home to a friend of his. Come on, I live right upstairs. Just from this,...
3
votes
2answers
748 views

Is "If you haven't finished your MR..., please finish it..." correct?

Is the sentence below correct? If you haven't finished your MR (morning reading), please finish it during the lunch break. I want to send this message to our study group to remind people ...
3
votes
1answer
843 views

Grammar : Adverb Or Adjective (noticeably or noticeable)

Jack steadily progressed, noticeably through increased eye contact and a louder voice. In this sentence, which one is grammatically right, 'noticeable' or 'noticeably'? Here, I'd like to express ...
3
votes
2answers
3k views

usage of "including as"

The following is the SAT Question of the day (August 25): The gong, believed to have originated in Western Asia, reached China in the sixth century, where it continues to be used for a wide range ...
3
votes
1answer
146 views

Adverbial Phrase, Parenthetical Phrase, or Something Different?

“It was a dark and stormy night; the rain fell in torrents, except at occasional intervals, when it was checked by a violent gust of wind which swept up the streets (for it is in London that our scene ...
3
votes
2answers
746 views

Sink Up To Their Hubs [closed]

I have a question about the usage of the verb "sink" here: Wagon sank up to their hubs. "Sink" means, loosely, going downward in some liquid. So, the part "up to their hubs" seems weird. ...
3
votes
1answer
934 views

Use of 'while' with Tenses?

1.John helps his mother while she cooks. 2.John helps his mother while she is cooking. 3.John helps his mother while she has been cooking. (A) Are the above sentences correct? I guess first ...
3
votes
3answers
1k views

I think we still need to practice some more

We all know here 'some more' used as an 'adverb': Would you like some more cake? I think we still need to practice some more. If the rice is still not cooked, add some more water. ...
3
votes
1answer
77 views

Meaning of "with too much criticism" in this article

I saw this news from tribune.com, but I am not pretty sure about the last sentence: Gabriel, who is Chancellor Angela Merkel’s deputy in a left-right coalition, warned against alienating Saudi ...
2
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2answers
5k views

Is "last two years ago, I was in a classical concert " a correct sentence?

In my English class my Teacher said I cannot use "Last two years ago...", so what should I use correctly?
2
votes
1answer
89 views

flew one meter into the air?

I am curious about how native speakers of English interpret the movement as in "The skier went over a bump and flew one meter into the air." Was the movement vertical, i.e. was the skier one meter ...
2
votes
3answers
182 views

Adverbial Phrase? [closed]

Apologies for the long question. I will request if someone can please answer this thoroughly as it will help me put a lot of pieces of grammatical puzzle together. If possible, please answer only ...
2
votes
2answers
842 views

"Deep in the forest a call was sounding", existential construction?

“Deep in the forest a call was sounding, and as often as he heard this call, mysteriously thrilling and luring, he felt compelled to turn his back upon the fire and the beaten earth around it, and to ...
2
votes
2answers
112 views

Parsing this sentence containing a "when" clause

Consider: A premium of 0.2 per cent is to be added to the CIRRs when fixing at bid. Interest rates may not be fixed for longer than 120 days. (Source) Why can "a premium" act as the subject for "...
2
votes
2answers
336 views

About the Usage of "When" Clauses as Adjective-clauses

In the 19th century, Yukichi Fukuzawa, one of the greatest Japanese politicians and philosophers, wrote during his studying abroad: "Language is a tool. It is like a hammer when you build a house." ...

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