Questions tagged [adverbial-phrases]

Adverbial phrase (also known as adverb phrase) is a term for two or more words functions adverbially (i.e. as an adverb).

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
2answers
33 views

A phrase function : adverb phrase or adjective phrase

In text book, there is a sentence which I can't analyze. She's very conventional in her views. Is a preposition phrase(in her views) an adverb phrase or an adjective phrase? , Or does it function a ...
1
vote
2answers
33 views

difference between an adjective phrase and an adverbial phrase

In a web-site, I happen upon a sentence I can’t understand grammatically. Famished from the journey, John decided to hunker down with his horse. They mark that a front part is an adjective phrase. I ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Is the prepositional phrase an adverbial or adjective phrase

In the sentence quoted below are the prepositions "for 2021" and "without latest software" acting as an adjective or adverb? "Fossil announces new smartwatches for 2021 ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Telic /atelic verb phrases

What is the best way to identify the verb phrase as telic/atelic apart from adding durational adverbials(such as in-adverbial and for-adverbial) and using such lexical verbs as stop/finish?
0
votes
0answers
9 views

being + Noun phrases vs bare Noun phrases

I had believed that a simple sentence consisting of the verb be, or its variant, could be reduced in the following way. She is a good student. ------- I consider her a good student. I had also assumed ...
0
votes
1answer
41 views

“Don’t jump on the couch.” Ambiguity

Can “don’t jump on the couch” mean “don’t jump off the couch,” or does it only mean “don’t jump onto the couch”? How to recommend someone be on the couch and then jump? I think there’s no word like “...
1
vote
1answer
42 views

Adverbial prepositional phrase order

“I ate too much in the restaurant.” “I ate in the restaurant too much.” Is there a difference between them? “too much” and “in the restaurant” are both adverbial.
0
votes
1answer
20 views

How Is This A subordinate Clause?

The instructor said that the sentence below contains a subordinate clause ("... if only for financial reasons."), but I feel that what is being called a 'subordinate clause,' is just a ...
0
votes
2answers
43 views

Can an adverbial clause modify only a verb?

Can an adverbial clause modify only a verb? Down below, words in bold are verbs modified. Italic clauses are clauses modifying the verbs Example 1, Getting bullied because he was shorter was ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Using “in between” as an adverb

Can we use “in between” when talking about something between two things when those two things are not specified? Example: Let’s say I am watching this video with a friend of mine. Can I say, “The cat ...
0
votes
2answers
28 views

Comma before adverbial phrase at end of sentence

I am using a grammar software and it constantly tells me to use commas before what I think is an adverbial phrase at the end of a sentence (and thus is not predceded by a comme). An example: "...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

The usage of "at intervals"

The ponds are linked with each by waterfalls at intervals from higher terraces to the lower ones. The sentence is a translation from Chinese to English describing a huge pond formed by several ...
0
votes
1answer
17 views

<very well above>, <so well above>, <so much above>

Are the phrases “very well above,” “so well above,” and “so much above” correct? Example sentences: The bridge is very well above us. The bridge is so well above us! The bridge is so much above us! ...
0
votes
0answers
25 views

The position of "such as Google, Facebook, and Instagram"

I'd like to learn what places fit "such as Google, Facebook, and Instagram" in the following sentence. The internet brought new applications into our lives such as Google, Facebook, and ...
1
vote
1answer
22 views

Can these questions be answered with these answers?

I am trying to reach the question form by going through its standard sentence form. In my native language, Turkish, The question form of I'm talking about the money that is for your education = I'm ...
0
votes
2answers
33 views

What does "On what subject did you conduct studies?" exactly ask about?

I know that a question can directly be related to a verb. However, can it refer to a noun rather than the verb? For example; On what subject did you conduct studies? I think that this question can ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Is it possible to use “next” between subject and verb?

When we next see Alex and Max, who are presently parents of two children, they will have had a new baby in their family. Source: English Grammar Digest by Trudy Aronson. I know Only a few adverbs of ...
0
votes
1answer
10 views

position of "Addressing concerns over the impact of the release"

What's the difference between the following sentences? Suppose the sentence occurs in the third paragraph of a news report, and the first paragraph mentions the decision faces opposition from home and ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

The usage of "but" in a sentence

Please take a look at this passage: It is due to a misunderstanding that most modern sculptures are monochromatic. When ancient sculptures were exhumed years ago, they were discovered to be uncolored....
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Is this phrase an adverbial phrase modifying the verb “competed”?

I competed in the marathon, not because I wanted to... Is "not because I wanted to" an adverbial phrase that modifies the verb "competed"?
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Is "without" a preposition or an adverb in "Without thinking where I was going"? Lexical word or grammatical word?

I'm doing my English homework and I have this doubt so I would appreciate your help. I need to know whether "without" is a preposition or an adverb in this specific sentence in order to ...
0
votes
0answers
41 views

Is this a correct analysis of an adverbial prepositional phrase?

I am trying to analyse what I judge a compound sentence with an adverbial phrase (in italics) placed at the beginning: In what turned out to be a common experience for many people who tried to create ...
1
vote
2answers
45 views

Plurals: "As matters of fact", "As matter of facts", and "As matters of facts" which one(s) when? if any?

I am wondering which one is correct or when/where one should use them: As matters of facts, A did X and B did Y. As matters of fact, A did X and B did Y. As matter of facts, A did X and B did Y. I ...
1
vote
1answer
74 views

no later than ~ VS by no later than ~

I am familiar with "no later than"". However, I have seen "by no later than". As far as I know, "no later than" has meaning as follows. ​by a particular time and ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

Question About adveral clause

The things as they are expected to help us, As sentence above, I heard that 'as clause' is a adverbal clause, but I want to know that what someone said is right, that is, This adverbal clause modifies ...
0
votes
0answers
20 views

Conditionals and adverb clauses

(1) If I ate too much food now, I wouldn't be able to eat anything else when my pizza arrives in 30 minutes. Is the arrives correct here? (2) If I didn't sleep now, I would look terrible when I go ...
0
votes
5answers
123 views

What's the problem with "Colonization hundreds of years ago is held accountable for such situation"?

I wrote the following sentence. Colonization hundreds of years ago is held accountable for such situation. I think I have used "hundreds of years ago" as a modifier of "colonization&...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

Adverbial modifier after than?

I read a sentence as follows from a book by a Harvard professor(born in the U.S.A.): Despite the fact that farming required more strenuous physical exertion than most urban jobs, the rural grain ...
3
votes
2answers
102 views

Does "right upstairs" mean "on the floor directly above"?

Background This line from Monk: Mr. Monk Makes a Friend (2007) motivates this question. Adrian Monk says this just outside his home to a friend of his. Come on, I live right upstairs. Just from this,...
-2
votes
4answers
30 views

My question is about adverb aspect of 'hard' [closed]

Is it okay to say: the driver was driving hard because the weather was dark. Or do we say: the weather was hard dark so the driver couldn't see a thing.
0
votes
2answers
26 views

Can a noun clause be part of an adverbial phrase?

For example: "He was punished for what he did to his brother."
1
vote
1answer
50 views

Surprisingly enough vs very surprisingly

I am not a native speaker of english language but I have noted that surprisingly enough is used more often than very surprisingly. What is the real difference between two? Enough and very both are ...
1
vote
2answers
248 views

The police questioned everyone in the room. Here "in the room" is an adjective phrase or an adverb phrase

The police questioned everyone in the room. Here "in the room" is an adjective phrase or an adverb phrase I think it is an adverb phrase.But some of the teachers of our country think it an ...
19
votes
6answers
3k views

Sentences containing "refused to close his bar because"

a. He refused to close his bar because of the pandemic. b. He refused to close his bar because there was a pandemic. Are the above sentences grammatically correct, and do they make sense? The intended ...
0
votes
1answer
47 views

modificational scope of "two years ago"

In the following sentence, does the "two years ago" describe the time of buying or reading the book? I bought the book which I had read two years ago and which had the author's autograph. ...
1
vote
0answers
284 views

Meaning of 'All-out brawl'?

I know the meaning of 'brawl'.But what does this phrase 'all-out brawl' mean? Thanks in Advance.
0
votes
2answers
58 views

'prevent from willing participating' or 'prevent from willingly participating'?

'prevent from willing participating' or 'prevent from willingly participating'? For example: His active vocabulary is rather limited, but this doesn’t prevent him from willingly participating in ...
0
votes
1answer
16 views

too and either usage differences

A: I don't like oranges. B: I don't like oranges either. This is the right way to express this idea. question 1: But why can't it be written like this: B: I too don't like oranges. question ...
1
vote
1answer
25 views

Can 'hardly' convey two opposite meanings based on its location in a sentence?

Is there a semantic difference between these two sentences? I defended the case quite hardly. vs. I hardly defended the case. For my understanding, these two sentences have an opposite ...
0
votes
2answers
12 views

Can this prepositional phrase be considered an adverbial phrase?

In this sentence: "Tom is playing God of War at Tim's house." The prepositional phrase "at Tim's house" works as an adverbial phrase?
1
vote
1answer
2k views

"It was nice meeting you or it was nice talking to you", What's the grammar?

I'm not sure about this thing, but it has been tormenting me for a while. I can't really understand the grammatical structure of it was nice meeting you. I mean, if nice in itself is an adjective, ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

Use of tautology

I have read a sentence that SHOCKED me if it is correct. In the sentence I read the verb 'waste' preceding the adverb 'needlessly'. Can anything be wasted under a need? Does the adverb 'needlessly' ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Is the phrase "one too many times" an adverb? If it is, what kind of adverb is it?

If "one too many times" is an adverb What kind of adveb is "one too many times"?
0
votes
1answer
251 views

for long vs. for a long time

I have not heard from him for long or for a long time. Can I use for long and for a long time in the above sentence interchangeably? Or do these phrases have different meaning and usage?
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Is there a difference in meanig between "as someone told you to" and "as someone told you"

a. You didn't come home late last night, as your Dad told you to. b. You didn't come home late last night, as your Dad told you. Do these mean: Your Dad told you to come home late last ...
-1
votes
1answer
45 views

Can you explain me why?

I'm studying english now and something confused my mind. Question; "On average, the Japanese car companies are ........ ones in the world market. A) the most productive B) more productive I ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

so that... usage

1) You must carry on so that you will succeed 2)You must carry on so that you may succeed 3)You must carry on so that you can succeed My grammar book is saying that sentence1 is wrong and ...
0
votes
0answers
45 views

Adverb clause of comparision

example1: “He is wiser that I” example2: “He is wiser than me”. I know example1 is correct and example2 is grammatically wrong. But please check the below conditions Sentence1: “I found her ...
0
votes
1answer
263 views

"winning the lottery" vs "having won the lottery" vs "with/by winning the lottery"

I am working with clauses with adverbial meaning, and here is my sentence: Were I to win the lottery, I would have all (of) that money spent fast. Keep in mind that I have to express condition. ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Can I use almost and job together?

My question, as I said in the title, is that can I use almost and job together? For example, is the sentence below correct (meaning and place of almost)? Unfortunately, there is almost no job ...

1
2 3 4 5