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Questions tagged [adverbials]

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11 votes
5 answers
1k views

Is it grammatically correct to say 'I suspect this clause to be a bit sloppy English'?

I have been told by a user it's wrong to say 'I suspect this clause to be a bit sloppy English' because 'a bit' is used there attributively and that 'a bit' can only be used predicatively as in the ...
philphil's user avatar
  • 1,509
3 votes
3 answers
874 views

a man tall and strong

I talked to a tall and strong man like you. I talked to a man tall and strong like you. I talked to a tall and strong man, like you. I talked to a man tall and strong, like you. What is the ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
1 vote
0 answers
40 views

Can "the mornings" be used as an adverbial? E.g.: "The mornings it was raining, I went for a massage. The mornings it was sunny, I went to the beach."

I know that the prepositional phrases "in/on the mornings", "in/on the afternoons" and "in/on the evenings" can be used as adverbials. But I don't know whether the noun ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
-2 votes
1 answer
72 views

"They live ten miles north of Boston."—Does it mean "10m from the north of Boston to the north" or "from the north of Boston to an unknown direction"?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) They live ten miles north of Boston. What does it literally mean?: (1a) Being in the north of Boston, we should go ten miles north in order to come to them. (1b) ...
Loviii's user avatar
  • 4,920
5 votes
3 answers
920 views

I learned much of my English watching

I learned much of my English vocabulary watching Hollywood movies. I learned much of my English vocabulary from watching Hollywood movies. I learned much of my English vocabulary by watching Hollywood ...
Mr. X's user avatar
  • 872
1 vote
2 answers
36 views

Is the present participle phrase correctly used to establish cause and effect relationship?

She brought fourteen children to term and lost four of them, leaving her with ten kids who ranged in age from Anne, who was twenty, to Billy and Jim, the sweet-eyed twins, who were six. From Say ...
rahul sehrawat's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
44 views

talked angrily to me as [closed]

a. He talked angrily to me, as to his child. b. He talked angrily to me as to his child. Do these mean: He talked angrily to me and to his child as well. He talked angrily to me in the same way he ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
0 votes
2 answers
81 views

So that vs so to express purpose

He studied hard __ he could go to a good university A. because B. in order to C. so D. so that I guess D is the "right" answer. According to what I have learned, "so" and "...
ForOU's user avatar
  • 1,677
0 votes
1 answer
22 views

Prepositional phrase or adjective phrase

i think that we can make a step in the right direction In the sentence above, is "that we can make a step in the right direction" a noun clause or adverb clause? It's very confusing for me ...
Rifpan Afriansyah's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

Is 'skeptical' an adverbial accusative in this sentence?

I understand 'good' is an adverb meaning 'well' in this example sentence of 'start out' in the Merriam-Webster dictionary : The story started out good, but I didn't like the ending. But I think '...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
40 views

as his father played pool

a. As his father played pool, so did he. I think (a) can mean that he played pool because his father did, or that they played pool at the same time. Could it mean that he played pool in the same ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
-2 votes
1 answer
21 views

the document to analyse [closed]

a) I sent them the document to analyze. Can't this correspond to: I sent them the document for them to analyze it and I sent them the document which was to be analyzed. (It is even possible to ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
3 votes
2 answers
721 views

in four months / after four months / four months later

Are the following boldfaced options okay? If any one of them is not okay, could you explain why? The judge sentenced the murderer to death on December 15 last year, and he was executed in four months ...
Apollyon's user avatar
  • 6,006
1 vote
1 answer
37 views

Is "that" omissible after "with the result"?

In CGEL, while discussing the purpose adjuncts "so/in order" + that-clause (p. 727), it is stated that "that" is omissible after "so", but not after "in order". ...
Seymour Azzes's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
113 views

Can an "adverb of time" modify a noun/ noun phrase?

I'm aware that an "adverb of time" usually just modifies a verb and answers the question "when". But, I'm a bit confused with this sentence here: "He completed a course for a ...
DanielSun's user avatar
2 votes
2 answers
75 views

Deciding the semantic role of an adverbial clause starting with "with"

The sentence at issue is When I woke up with my legs dangling over the side of the bed, my feet touched something other than the floor. Could you help me determine whether "with my legs ...
Karl's user avatar
  • 21
0 votes
1 answer
38 views

Which is the adverbial in this sentence

You're at the station at the moment, right? OK, so I live about a kilometre from there. Go out of the station and walk down the road and away from the city centre. For sure there are many adverbials ...
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
55 views

Adverbial clause of purpose

I read in some grammar book that "If the verb in the main clause is in the present tense we use 'will, can, may' in the adverbial clause of purpose and if it is in the past tense we use 'would, ...
Englishfreak's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Participles Functioning as Adverbials

I've read that 'participles functioning as adverbials' can be usefully viewed as reduced forms of adverb clauses. My question is can all participles functioning as adverbials be reconstituted into ...
Brooh's user avatar
  • 113
0 votes
2 answers
31 views

Why the correct option is 'unless properly dealt with' rather than others?

I am practicing an exercise for conditional adverbial clause, there is a hard exercise that makes me confused with all these four options. The official soon realized that, ( ), things would get worse....
Beau Garçon Idol Lucianus's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
77 views

Participle Clause - Adjectival or Adverbial

It is hard for me to parse the participle clause in the following sentence and to know whether it is an adjectival or adverbial clause. "Notices were placed in the press all over the United ...
mahmud k pukayoor's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
25 views

a knife to defend himself

a. He had a knife in his pocket to defend himself. b. In his pocket, he had a knife to defend himself. c. He had a knife to defend himself in his pocket. Are all of the above sentences grammatically ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
1 vote
2 answers
64 views

Each is correct

Today I was talking with my boyfriend and I said: I wanted to know if you got safe at work and he answered me like that Oh sorry, I got there safe. But I automatically said it’s wrong to use "...
Da Cruz Flávia's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
29 views

“In the way quoted” or “the way in which quoted”

I wouldn't use 'degree of' in the way quoted in the Cambridge Corpus Shouldn’t it be “I wouldn’t use ‘degree of’ the way in which it is quoted in the Cambridge Corpus”? Why do concrete nouns not ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
141 views

I wrote a letter for an hour

I've just read that it is not possible to say "I wrote a letter for three hours", but I've seen many examples like "I read the book for an hour" or "I watched the film for an ...
anouk's user avatar
  • 3,954
0 votes
0 answers
52 views

What parts of speech are "together" and "at the park"?

What parts of speech do you think 'together' and 'at the park' are and what do they describe in this sentence: Nobody saw Anna and John together at the park. I'm thinking 'together' is a adverb, and ...
Willowfey123's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
53 views

Understanding simultaneity: "Sue was surprised and said, “What the hell!”"

I have difficulty understanding the difference between three sentences below: Sue was surprised and said, “What the hell!” and Sue was surprised as she said, “What the hell!” and Sue said in ...
Ray Siplao's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
25 views

Phil, in his bedroom, texted Jane

a. In his bedroom, Phil texted Jane. b. Phil, in his bedroom, texted Jane. Wouldn't you say that there are three slightly different ways to understand these sentences? Phil, who was in his bedroom, ...
azz's user avatar
  • 2,981
-2 votes
1 answer
34 views

Is there a mistake in my sentences? (inversion)

Inversion to emphasize a negative or limiting adverbial 1.We didn't discover the mistake until much later. Ans: Not until much later did we discover the mistake. 2.Nowadays People no longer go by sea. ...
Jake's user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
1 answer
72 views

Which (if either) of these two possibilities is the better choice?

Could you please tell me which of the following sentences is right? Please arrange a meeting for today, 10 a.m. so that we can finalize the plan. Please arrange a meeting so that we can finalize the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
88 views

How can we say that 'adverbs are placed as close as possible to the words they are supposed to modify'

eg. He ate the cake quickly, In this sentence 'quickly' modifies 'ate' but they are not close to each other.
ketan pendharkar's user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
131 views

How to explain an adverbial modifier being between a verb and an object?

In any Grammar I read I see: "We don't put adverbs between the verb and the object" https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/adverbs-and-adverb-phrases-position but when I ...
Let's user avatar
  • 729
0 votes
1 answer
40 views

"I use my phone to keep in touch with my friends asking them about homework."

I heard a native speaker say this sentence I use my phone to keep in touch with my friends asking them about homework. I wonder why he said ‘asking’ instead of ‘to ask’. Is it a gerund?
user117023's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
4k views

for long vs. for a long time

I have not heard from him for long or for a long time. Can I use for long and for a long time in the above sentence interchangeably? Or do these phrases have different meaning and usage?
Russell Zaman's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
474 views

'Almost' between the verb and the object

I wonder if I can use the adverb 'almost' between the verb and the object. Can I write, I ate almost the whole fish. or do I have to write, I almost ate the whole fish. It appears to me both ...
Russell Zaman's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
36 views

What does "where" mean in "co-operating with liberal or conservative parties where possible to survive the entire term"?

In their 2020-02-05 column, “Minority report: German politics”, The Economist writes: In the 1970s West Germany’s two main parties, one centre-left, one centre-right, together captured over 90% of ...
wtdark's user avatar
  • 385
2 votes
3 answers
105 views

How can I know when a present-tense verb has a future time implication not strictly a present time one?

When do I know that the present tense has a future implication not a present one? For instance: We are making some changes to the speech and we are losing the ‘ocean’ part. Does the verb losing here ...
Ahmed Hossam's user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
8k views

is it correct to say "at the lessons"?

Many Russian textbooks use the adverbial "at the lessons" meaning that something takes place during some lessons/classes. For example: "Children call each other names at the lessons". I heard that ...
Let's user avatar
  • 729
1 vote
2 answers
249 views

Picking out Adverb Phrases from the given sentence

He strove with all his might to escape According to my Wren and Martin textbook, with all his might is an adverb phrase in the given sentence. But what is to escape? Is it an adverb phrase as well?
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Are adverbials inclined to the subject?Rather than simply modifying the verb

"He writes the word on the board." If adverbials are simply about the verb, then “on the board” in “He writes the word on the board” can be explained as either an adverbial or an complement, for on ...
Inorganic_Salt's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Can this clause function as an adverbial of reason?

I couldn’t analyse the structure of this sentence properly. Specifically, i don’t know what is the function of the clause “over giving weighting factor to the role of youngsters.” This is the whole ...
Nasreen111 's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
309 views

"Me either" or "Me too" - what's the correct reply?

My friend, she texted me ' I"m just glad no cougar or bear approached you.' And I said ' Yeah, Me either' I mean 'Me too' Is this correct reply..?
Jayden Kim's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
172 views

Disjunct/Adjunct and the focus of cleft sentence

I generally don't follow the terminology and framework of A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (CGEL) by Quirk et al., rather I follow The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CaGEL). ...
Man_From_India's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
32 views

Putting a word between "every" and "day"

Can I put any word between every and day in these circumstances: I feel disappointed every exam day. He brings his umbrella along every cloudy day. Thank you.
Kumar sadhu's user avatar
  • 1,829
-1 votes
1 answer
29 views

Is while in this sentence necessary? [closed]

Today I am supposed to give my introduction in front of a student whom I am going to teach. I have prepared a speech that goes like this I am Kuldeep Sharma. I am a language trainer. A language ...
kuldeep sharma's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
128 views

Is a fronted phrase describing a state of mind a "fronted adverbial"?

My son's learning about fronted adverbials at school (at the age of 11). When he goes to write one, he generally comes up with things like this (when asked to do a sentence for a picture with a car in ...
T.J. Crowder's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
265 views

future in the past + adverbial clause

I would like to ask a question about the future in the past and the adverbial clause used in the sentence which indicates the future. I know we can indicate future in the past, for example by using "...
Motoki's user avatar
  • 179