Questions tagged [adverbials]

The tag has no usage guidance.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0 votes
0 answers
21 views

Participles Functioning as Adverbials

I've read that 'participles functioning as adverbials' can be usefully viewed as reduced forms of adverb clauses. My question is can all participles functioning as adverbials be reconstituted into ...
user avatar
  • 23
0 votes
2 answers
21 views

Why the correct option is 'unless properly dealt with' rather than others?

I am practicing an exercise for conditional adverbial clause, there is a hard exercise that makes me confused with all these four options. The official soon realized that, ( ), things would get worse....
user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
30 views

Participle Clause - Adjectival or Adverbial

It is hard for me to parse the participle clause in the following sentence and to know whether it is an adjectival or adverbial clause. "Notices were placed in the press all over the United ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
23 views

a knife to defend himself

a. He had a knife in his pocket to defend himself. b. In his pocket, he had a knife to defend himself. c. He had a knife to defend himself in his pocket. Are all of the above sentences grammatically ...
user avatar
  • 1,813
1 vote
1 answer
35 views

Each is correct

Today I was talking with my boyfriend and I said: I wanted to know if you got safe at work and he answered me like that Oh sorry, I got there safe. But I automatically said it’s wrong to use "...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
27 views

“In the way quoted” or “the way in which quoted”

I wouldn't use 'degree of' in the way quoted in the Cambridge Corpus Shouldn’t it be “I wouldn’t use ‘degree of’ the way in which it is quoted in the Cambridge Corpus”? Why do concrete nouns not ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
77 views

I wrote a letter for an hour

I've just read that it is not possible to say "I wrote a letter for three hours", but I've seen many examples like "I read the book for an hour" or "I watched the film for an ...
user avatar
  • 3,833
0 votes
0 answers
35 views

What parts of speech are "together" and "at the park"?

What parts of speech do you think 'together' and 'at the park' are and what do they describe in this sentence: Nobody saw Anna and John together at the park. I'm thinking 'together' is a adverb, and ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
16 views

Adverbial before verb before subject

Many grammars say that there are a limited number of sentence patterns in English, usually starting with SP.../SV... (e.g. SPO, SPA, SPOO ...). How would you then explain the existence of AVS ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
50 views

Understanding simultaneity: "Sue was surprised and said, “What the hell!”"

I have difficulty understanding the difference between three sentences below: Sue was surprised and said, “What the hell!” and Sue was surprised as she said, “What the hell!” and Sue said in ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
22 views

Phil, in his bedroom, texted Jane

a. In his bedroom, Phil texted Jane. b. Phil, in his bedroom, texted Jane. Wouldn't you say that there are three slightly different ways to understand these sentences? Phil, who was in his bedroom, ...
user avatar
  • 1,813
-2 votes
1 answer
28 views

Is there a mistake in my sentences? (inversion)

Inversion to emphasize a negative or limiting adverbial 1.We didn't discover the mistake until much later. Ans: Not until much later did we discover the mistake. 2.Nowadays People no longer go by sea. ...
user avatar
  • 1
-1 votes
1 answer
41 views

Which (if either) of these two possibilities is the better choice?

Could you please tell me which of the following sentences is right? Please arrange a meeting for today, 10 a.m. so that we can finalize the plan. Please arrange a meeting so that we can finalize the ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
76 views

How can we say that 'adverbs are placed as close as possible to the words they are supposed to modify'

eg. He ate the cake quickly, In this sentence 'quickly' modifies 'ate' but they are not close to each other.
user avatar
3 votes
2 answers
95 views

How to explain an adverbial modifier being between a verb and an object?

In any Grammar I read I see: "We don't put adverbs between the verb and the object" https://dictionary.cambridge.org/grammar/british-grammar/adverbs-and-adverb-phrases-position but when I ...
user avatar
  • 641
0 votes
1 answer
32 views

"I use my phone to keep in touch with my friends asking them about homework."

I heard a native speaker say this sentence I use my phone to keep in touch with my friends asking them about homework. I wonder why he said ‘asking’ instead of ‘to ask’. Is it a gerund?
user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
600 views

for long vs. for a long time

I have not heard from him for long or for a long time. Can I use for long and for a long time in the above sentence interchangeably? Or do these phrases have different meaning and usage?
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
244 views

'Almost' between the verb and the object

I wonder if I can use the adverb 'almost' between the verb and the object. Can I write, I ate almost the whole fish. or do I have to write, I almost ate the whole fish. It appears to me both ...
user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
35 views

What does "where" mean in "co-operating with liberal or conservative parties where possible to survive the entire term"?

In their 2020-02-05 column, “Minority report: German politics”, The Economist writes: In the 1970s West Germany’s two main parties, one centre-left, one centre-right, together captured over 90% of ...
user avatar
  • 339
2 votes
3 answers
72 views

How can I know when a present-tense verb has a future time implication not strictly a present time one?

When do I know that the present tense has a future implication not a present one? For instance: We are making some changes to the speech and we are losing the ‘ocean’ part. Does the verb losing here ...
user avatar
1 vote
2 answers
5k views

is it correct to say "at the lessons"?

Many Russian textbooks use the adverbial "at the lessons" meaning that something takes place during some lessons/classes. For example: "Children call each other names at the lessons". I heard that ...
user avatar
  • 641
1 vote
2 answers
167 views

Picking out Adverb Phrases from the given sentence

He strove with all his might to escape According to my Wren and Martin textbook, with all his might is an adverb phrase in the given sentence. But what is to escape? Is it an adverb phrase as well?
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
32 views

Are adverbials inclined to the subject?Rather than simply modifying the verb

"He writes the word on the board." If adverbials are simply about the verb, then “on the board” in “He writes the word on the board” can be explained as either an adverbial or an complement, for on ...
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
29 views

Can this clause function as an adverbial of reason?

I couldn’t analyse the structure of this sentence properly. Specifically, i don’t know what is the function of the clause “over giving weighting factor to the role of youngsters.” This is the whole ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
147 views

"Me either" or "Me too" - what's the correct reply?

My friend, she texted me ' I"m just glad no cougar or bear approached you.' And I said ' Yeah, Me either' I mean 'Me too' Is this correct reply..?
user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
127 views

Disjunct/Adjunct and the focus of cleft sentence

I generally don't follow the terminology and framework of A Comprehensive Grammar of the English Language (CGEL) by Quirk et al., rather I follow The Cambridge Grammar of the English Language (CaGEL). ...
user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
30 views

Putting a word between "every" and "day"

Can I put any word between every and day in these circumstances: I feel disappointed every exam day. He brings his umbrella along every cloudy day. Thank you.
user avatar
  • 1,795
-1 votes
1 answer
27 views

Is while in this sentence necessary? [closed]

Today I am supposed to give my introduction in front of a student whom I am going to teach. I have prepared a speech that goes like this I am Kuldeep Sharma. I am a language trainer. A language ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
70 views

Is a fronted phrase describing a state of mind a "fronted adverbial"?

My son's learning about fronted adverbials at school (at the age of 11). When he goes to write one, he generally comes up with things like this (when asked to do a sentence for a picture with a car in ...
user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
207 views

future in the past + adverbial clause

I would like to ask a question about the future in the past and the adverbial clause used in the sentence which indicates the future. I know we can indicate future in the past, for example by using "...
user avatar
  • 179