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Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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What is the meaning of "sharply" in "Jem looked up sharply"?

This context comes from the book "To Kill A Mocking Bird" by Harper Lee "Jem’s ears reddened from Atticus’s compliment, but he looked up sharply when he saw Atticus stepping back." ...
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What is the sense of adverbs in the beginning of the sentence?

One may put adverbs in English at the beginning of the sentence. For example: Yesterday, I went to the library and borrowed a much-needed book. I went to the library and borrowed a much-needed book ...
Александр Скворцов's user avatar
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Using straight as an adverb

I'm doing a worksheet where I have to identify adverbs. The sentence is "If you're running for three days straight you can't just eat energy snacks." The correct answer is "straight&...
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Alone as an adverb or as an adjective

Alone, thought Bittering. Does the word 'alone' describe Bittering as an adjective or his action of thinking as an adverb? Does the sentence mean that Bittering thought that he was alone or it means ...
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two times as little/much as - acceptable

Jack earns two times as much as I do. Jack earns two times as little as I do. I am not sure that they are correct. Can you shed some light on the issue?
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Should I say "I only need to develop iOS games, rather than other non-game apps", "I need to develop only iOS games …", or some other wording?

Swift is a programming language for developing iOS apps. However, some game engines such as Unity, uses other languages, such as C#. to inquire whether I need writing Swift, should I ask If I only ...
singularli's user avatar
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sings here only on Saturdays

a. He sings here only on Saturdays. Does that mean that he sings here every Saturday? b. He only doesn't practice on Sundays. Does that mean that he never practices on Sundays? Many thanks
azz's user avatar
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Confusing Components in a Sentence: adverbial modifier OR object in a prepositional phrase

I'm trying to understand the grammatical role of a phrase in a sentence. The sentence in question is: "And all without the government having to spend any money up-front, which is amazing." ...
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Saying: "students are most anxious about their pronunciation" instead of "mostly anxious" is acceptable?

I faced some thought-provoking matters today. While most is a superlative form and mostly an adverb, I've been wondering if the sentences below would be grammatically appropriate and interchangeable: ...
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What is the adverb in these sentences "I love you too" and "I too love you"?

I love you too and I too love you If the adverb is too, then what it does modify. Either it modifies the pronouns I and you respectively or the verb love?
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Reported Speech Time Expression

[Direct speech] We can change the environmental campaign next year? How should this sentence be written in reported speech? A: He is saying they can change the environmental campaign next year. B: ...
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drive slowly or drive more slowly?

Would it be wrong or unnatural/awkward if I asked somebody to "Drive slowly! You're driving too fast". Instead of "Drive more slowly! You're driving too fast"
Dmytro Grabovskyi's user avatar
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Is "targetedly" (i.e. the adverb of targeted) a word?

I want to convey that an action is done with a certain target in mind. Is "targetedly" (as the adverb of "targeted") the correct word? Several spellchecks don't know the word. For ...
DonQuiKong's user avatar
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"They ventured nervously into the water." & "He nervously ventured out onto the ice."— Difference between "ventured nervously" & "nervously ventured"?

oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com: (1) They ventured nervously into the water. my variant: (2) They nervously ventured into the water. What's the difference between (1) and (2)? britannica.com: (3) He ...
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Why does this native english speaker on TV use Present Perfect in her sentence that contains "years ago"? --- "She has given up years ago."

This native english speaker is telling about how she has quit 40-year habit of smoking. She says: "Linda, my sister, used to smoke. She has given up years ago, years ago." ITV-Coleen quit 40-...
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What does "radio on ahead" mean in this context?

This context comes from the video game "Bioshock". Atlas is someone who communicated with the person speaking informing them about my upcoming visit and trying to arrange help for me. "...
Static Bounce's user avatar
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Adverbs in the middle of phrasal verbs: He got quickly dressed

I did an activity with my students regarding adverb position. This is the prompt: He got dressed (quickly). The answers I provided were: He got dressed quickly. He quickly got dressed. However, a ...
Mónica Aguilar 's user avatar
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Can adverbs modify implied words in this case? [closed]

I watched soccer with my hands warmly in the pockets. This is what I made. Actually, "warmly" is meant to modify omitted "being". (I watched soccer with my hands being warmly in ...
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Article reads poorly/weird/weirdly - Are any of the given sentences grammatically incorrect? If so, why?

The article reads poorly. The article reads weird. The article reads weirdly. To me, a non-native speaker, the first sentence seems fine, the second one seems like it could be used in informal ...
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the meaning of "partially"

Here is a test I found on the website below https://ieltsonlinetests.com/ielts-mock-test-2023-march-reading-practice-test-3?mode=practice_test&parts=1&duration=120 There is a question I don't ...
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Is "more" an adverb or an adjective in "There is nothing more you need to do."

Is "more" an adverb or an adjective in "There is nothing more you need to do." I feel it can be regarded as an adverb as it modifies "you need to do." However, it can ...
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Can "-like" be an adverb?

Dumbledore gave his wand a little flick as if he was trying to get a fly off the end and a long golden ribbon flew out of it, which rose high above the tables and twisted itself snake-like into words. ...
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Understanding the Difference Between 'Usually' and 'Sometimes' [closed]

As an English learner, I often find myself confused about the correct usage of certain adverbs, especially when they seem to have similar meanings. I'm particularly unsure about the difference between ...
Iman Mohammadi's user avatar
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I didn't have enough time, however, I read the book till the end

This sentence is from an exercise ('use "However' to join the sentences : 'I didn't have enough time. I read the book till the end.'): ' I didn't have enough time, however, I read the book till ...
Didyougo's user avatar
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Adjective phrase or adverb phrase

Norma ate in silence. The word 'ate' is a transitive verb that requires an object to clear its meaning. What is the function of the phrase 'in silence' here? Either it's serving as an adjectival ...
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Can adverbs modify prepositions afterwards?

“Do you see why I feel this way?” “Oh yes, I'm with you completely.” It's not "I'm completely with you." If he's for helping the poor, I'm with him all the way! It's not "I'm all the ...
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Positions of an adverb "quickly"

My question has occured after I read this question "Confusion over the position of an adverb." Ian R answers (1) I can run quickly to the store , and (2) I can quickly run to the store ! ...
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Adverb "honestly" —At the beginning & At the mid position

I can't honestly say what time I'll be home. Vs Honestly, I can't say what time I'll be home. I think there is subtle difference in meaning, but I am not sure, Explain me the usage of the ...
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Syntax question. Why does this sentence sound awkward when I move the adverbial phrase?

Correct sentence: The dog roams the streets every day. Incorrect sentence: The dog roams every day the streets. Every day is an adverbial phrase that means "each day." I know the second ...
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Meaning of 'as saying'

"He was quoted as saying there would be further delays." Here what is the meaning of as saying? Like, Someone quoted him that, "he was saying— there would be further delays.(saying as ...
Ansh's user avatar
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Kind or kindly ways?

When I raised my first questions about the differing uses of culture I was given the impression, in kindly and not so kind ways, that these arose mainly from the fact of an incomplete education. This ...
Arseny Aleev's user avatar
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1 answer
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In this context "Possibly" is modifying what?

It's a possibly dangerous situation. I think "possibly" modifies the adjective "dangerous" or "dangerous situation", doesit(possibly)indicate manner? I found a definition ...
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Adverbs in mid postition and end position

I walk slowly I slowly walk Both sentences are right because I use adverbs in end and mid position, yes? Only one exception is badly which always goes in the end right?
train bee 282's user avatar
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3 answers
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"The layer of haze starts out tenuous": why not "tenuously"?

I watched a YouTube video about physics, and the host said the following. Similar to the Earth's atmosphere, the layer of haze starts out very tenuous. If I needed to say something like this, I ...
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Any difference between "walking slow" and "walking slowly"?

Is there a difference between these two versions? He walks so slow. He walks so slowly
Daylight's user avatar
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He is in politics some

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XVI, published 1892) Passage 249 “We've rather bad news for you, Mr. Dodd,” said Fowler. “Your firm's gone up.” “Already!” I ...
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"Best"—adverb or adjective (in the sentence)

The medicine is best taken after meals. I think it's an adverb modifying verb, but it can be an adjective after the copula.
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Why do we say 'aim high' instead of 'aim highly'?

I know we don't say 'aim highly', but I don't know how to exaplain in grammatical terms. Is 'aim high' an idiom? Is 'high' an adverb? If it is, then why can't we say 'aim highly'?
Louis Liu's user avatar
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I had just missed your call

When John walked in, I had just missed your call., Does that mean When John walked in, I had missed your call by a very narrow margin. I almost managed to get it. or I had missed your call a moment ...
azz's user avatar
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Run Into vs run onto [closed]

Why is the phrase run into and not run onto ?When you run onto someone you dont go inside his body(LOL).In is for anything with interior structure,at is for specific locations in time or in space and ...
Cerise's user avatar
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Can a linking verb be followed by an adverb?

I read a line in a grammar book "at least the play reads well" in this sentence, the verb "reads" is a linking verb, so shouldn't the right word to use be "good" instead ...
Akshit Raj's user avatar
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2 answers
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Phrasal verbs 101

Many phrasal verbs make the language more aurally pleasent for example: "Hear me out!".The verb "hear" means "listen" but it doesnt sound well if you say "Hear me&...
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Meaning of "To think of those old tin-type times about turned my head"

(From The Wrecker by Robert Louis Stevenson and Lloyd Osbourne, Chapter XI, published 1893) Passage 179 Never was a man so lucky! You and me and Mamie; it's a triple cord, Loudon. If either of you ...
philphil's user avatar
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Present Continuous+never for emotional tone

As we know Present Continuous is used with always / constantly to express some emotional nuance (often negative). e.g. My sister is always borrowing my clothes without asking! Can we similarly use ...
Aynat's user avatar
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Can adverbs act as subject complements?

Example: He is here. Or She is there. I have been taught that subject complements are adjectives, nouns, pronouns or phrases of them, but in the above example the adverb 'here' is describing the ...
Daniel Alemu's user avatar
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Is "never" an adverb of frequency or time?

Can never ever be called an adverb of time or is it always frequency? I found online that adverbs of time can express when, how long or how often. I never play volleyball. This is how often I play ...
Pumpkin cake's user avatar
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2 votes
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In this sentence, what are the main subject and the main verb?

Consider the following sentence: Though this was not a very good opportunity for showing off her knowledge, as there was no one to listen to her. In that sentence, what are the main subject and the ...
Jayjay's user avatar
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How to know when to use adverb or adverbial phrase?

Ex- In the sentence "look here" here is the adverb of the verb. If I write "look at here" why is this wrong? Can't I consider "at here" as the adverbial phrase with at ...
Akshit Raj's user avatar
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Usage of above as adverb

I know that adverbs modify adjectives, verbs and other adverbs but, this usage of the "above" as adverb is so different from the definiton of the adverb in english. the clouds above except ...
Cihan Şükrü Zorlu's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
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How to know when to use preposition with an adverb of place?

I saw a video of an English tutor saying that we say: I am going home, not I am going to home. because home is an adverb here. Why do we not follow the same guidance with sentences like: I am ...
Akshit Raj's user avatar

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