Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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23 views

Usage of “as” in a different way

Don't change a character that Gene intentionally created as straight. This is the sentence I saw on the internet. Can “as” be used to modifie adjectives . I mean Can I say ; You must raise our ...
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21 views

Can you say “everything is good” as well was “everything is well”

Is it grammatically correct to say "everything is good"? And why is "everything is well" correct? Isn't "well" an adverb? Edit: I'm looking for an answer for this phrase specifically.
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Say, I have two girlfriends. Which one would be more appropriate to say, “I love them equal” or “I love them equally.”

Honestly,the two sentences look identical to me. I have a feeling that there’s a slight difference between, "I love my two girlfriends equal" and "I love my two girlfriends equally."
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Can I put “well” before the main verb?

I've read the rule which states: One ought to put an adverb of manner after the main verb if the verb is intransitive, but if there's a direct object after the main verb and the verb is ...
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How not to use two adverbs in one sentence

How to use two adverbs in one sentence is been asked at least four times here: Use of two or more than two Adverbs in one sentence How do I put two adverbs together in a sentence? Two adverbs in a ...
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I have deliberately done this

Is it possible for an adverb derived from adjective to occur in between 'have' and 'done' in the present perfect tense?
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Is this sentence wrong? (Comparative Adverbs)

Question : The Spanish athlete / run / fast / than the other runners The Spanish athlete ran more fastly than the other runners. The Spanish athlete ran faster than the other runners. In my ...
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Why not say “we do chicken rightly”?

This is a commonly heard slogan: We do chicken right. I understand which means "we cook chicken in a right way" ,and the word right to be adverbial. 1,But why not use the adverb form rightly ...
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Use of less in different places

Is there any difference between uses of “less” in sentences below in terms of meaning. I mean use “less” in different place in sentences change the meaning ? Or Are word forms of them different from ...
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Place of adverb in sentences

1) It is estimated there are between 6000 and 10000 workers in the village. 2) It is estimated there are up to 6000 workers in the village. Would it be correct if i use “up to” and “ between” after ...
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often + used to

I know that adverbs of frequency such as "often" are usually put before the main verb (or after if the main verb is "to be") or at the end of the sentence. Examples: I often walk on the beach / I ...
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is “… from in the house” or similar structure correct?

can I use (prep.+ adv.) to describle a situation more accurately? Sometimes I can find similar expression on American TV series. For example, "I can see you from in the room" is slightly different ...
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“from ten days ahead” in this context

You should start the rehearsal from ten days ahead of the play. You should turn the indicators on from one mile ahead of the hospital. Is the sentence pattern from ahead of valid in these ...
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Can adverbs modify auxiliary verbs such as may, can, will, must, shall, should, would, could, do, and need?

For example, "You always can trust me" According to my grammar book, "You can always trust me" is always the correct form, but I'm not sure whether "You always can trust me" is wrong and whether "...
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“potential good {noun}” vs “potentially good {noun}" vs “good potential {noun}”

A good candidate But what if the candidate has the potential (n) to be good? Should I say A potentially good candidate or A potential good candidate or A good potential ...
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How each and individually differ as an adverb?

The legs of the chair are individually joined to the seat by screws. The legs of the chair are each joined to the seat by screws. I would like to know if there is any difference between the two ...
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What the adverb modifies: “I don't want to live forever” as an example

I was talking with a friend and we mentioned the song I Don't Wanna Live Forever. He said it meant "I just want to die for good." I disagreed, saying it meant "I don't want to be immortals". But ...
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How to use “best ever”

Consider this sentences: This is the best ever song that I've heard. This is the best song ever that I've heard. Which of them is correct? How should we combine "best ever" and a noun in ...
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26 views

Balls A are circumferentially aligned with balls B

I created the sentence below in order to describe the image above: Red balls are circumferentially aligned with blue balls. But, after googled, I am afraid that the sentence may describe the image ...
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Position of an adverb

I'm confused. I have this sentence (which is almost identical to what I read in the online dictionary dict.cc) I hope he will soon get well As a native German speaker, I really think that "soon" ...
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“meanwhile”, “on the other hand”, and “nevertheless”

In the following passage, is it correct to use "however"? Could it be replaced by "meanwhile", "on the other hand", or "nevertheless"? We have to remember that adolescents are often brittle! They ...
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“Till” or “up to” or “to” or another adverb?

Which one is correct? 1) "I looked at the photo album till the last photo" 2) "I looked at the photo album to the last photo" 3) "I looked at the photo album up to the last photo" Edit: I ...
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Can “quickly” be used in “I get tired quickly”?

On the English language quiz I wrote the sentence "I get tired quickly." And then I was corrected and said that "quickly" doesn't suit here. Instead of it I am to use the word "easily". Can I really ...
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Why is that “therefore” is usually followed by a comma and not “and so”?

I thought "therefore" and "and so" meant basically the same. Why, then, is "therefore" usually followed by a comma? (When it appears at the beginning of a sentence.) Therefore, Sunday's Super Bowl ...
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1answer
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Does this article have “adverbs” and “conjunctions” mixed up?

This is what the site says: Now used as both an adverb (first example) and a conjunction (second example): Now I need to pull my pie out of the oven. Now, I know it’s a bad idea, but ...
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Possible ambiguities when using “home” as an adverb? (study home, write home…)

I'm aware of the adverbialization of the word "home" in English. I go home. I read letters at home/home. But in what kind of sentences could we find that home and at home can't be interchangeable? (...
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What does “quite” mean in different contexts?

When I say something is quite clear, does it mean that it's 'so clear' or that it's 'moderately clear but not very'? According to Cambridge dictionary, quite can mean 'very' or 'moderately but not ...
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Is there any difference between the phrase “all the better” and “so much the better”?

Is there any difference between the phrases? For example: If can come earlier, it is all the better. If can come earlier, it is so much the better. By the way, do I have to include it is as ...
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When can we use adverbs as subjects of sentences? Why “Down came the rain” instead of “the rain came down”?

See this "The Itsy Bitsy Spider" song The itsy-bitsy spider Climbed up the water spout Down came the rain And washed the spider out Out came the sun And dried up all the rain And the itsy-bitsy ...
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Could have, Should have, Would have, Must have, Might have - Time Adverbs

When talking about past ability or possibility, we use could have or might have. When talking about past obligation or suggestion, we use should have. When talking about past strong guess, we use ...
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What does the “more” mean here?

What does the "more" mean in the following sentence: HTTP is used to transport more the HTML, HTML from the browser to render the view. The picture source:
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Is there any difference between “sideways” and “to the side”?

Is there any difference between sideways and to the side? For example: Stop leaning sideways/to the side! The car in front of us suddenly moved sideways/to the side. I feel that in the ...
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Can every adjective be after a noun?

I’ve heard that [noun] [adjective] equals [noun] [that is] [adjective]. But, then can every adjective be after a noun? She is a girl cute. This is a book interesting. The dog black is mine. ...
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The correct order of adverbs

I can't figure out which is the correct order of adverbs in the sentences below. We met each other in the subway by chance yesterday. We met each other by chance in the subway yesterday. Could you ...
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4answers
68 views

Can 'whole' be used as an adverb?

It rained the whole week except on Sunday. In this question is the word 'whole' an adverb? Or since the word 'week' is a noun, will it become a determiner?
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meaning: do something together

Does the following sentence make sense? This doesn't seem be a grammar question. Neither John nor I am having dinner together. I'd appreciate your help.
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The word “late” means “till a later time”

I got up late today. Here the word late means at a later time than usual and the opposite of early. Now, I worked late at work today. He stayed up late last night. Are these sentences fine ...
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Used to VS Before VS Earlier

If we talk about some actions which were happening in the past and don't happen anymore, we can use "used to": I used to smoke We can say the same without "used to" but with "before": I smoked ...
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I exactly will come\ I will exactly come

I got a little stuck with "exactly" in the word order: Don't doubt about me, I will exactly come to the party! Where should I put it? Can it be: Don't doubt about me, I exactly will come to the ...
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rather A than B vs A rather than B vs more of A than B

Does the position of "rather" make a difference in a comparison? For instance, is there any difference between the following sentences? He is rather a writer than a politician. He is a writer rather ...
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More Happily… right or wrong

"Happily keeping a 4.0 GPA, more happily done with that class" Is this sentence grammatically correct? It sounds wrong but might be right. Please help.
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369 views

When to use “I” or “I am”

I've been having some texting with someone else. None of us are English native speakers, but we are both pretty advanced. She thinks I'm more advanced than her, although I think I just have more ...
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the position of 'annually' in the 'as much amount of soybeans as' sentence

If you were to say the annual consumption of soybeans by one American is about the same as that by one Canadian, where would you place annually? [1] One American consumes about as much amount of ...
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Is there an adjective that means “elsewhere”?

Let's say we have an example: Sorry, I just meant something I observe in elsewhere discussions, not in our past topics Since elsewhere is an adverb, not adjective, the example is ungrammatical. "...
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Verb + object + to sb + adjective

Our own identities were simply given to us complete. Why doesn’t the adverb ‘completely’ comes, but adjective ‘complete’ to the end of the sentence above? Is it because that ‘complete’ modify the ...
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Meaning of the adverb “especially” after a subject in context

Tell me please what especially means in the following sejtence. All my family likes music. My father, especially, goes to as many concerts as he possiblay can. I would get it if there were the ...
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How to use the verb “play”?

A class has particularly enjoyed a film and want to see it again. Could they ask their teacher: "Could you play it again please?"
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“Straight up and down” meaning

A dictionary defines the word vertical adj as: straight up and down. So can I say someone draw a line that is straight up and down? Can the word horizontal mean straight from side to side? Please ...
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Truly VS really

1>Mahatma Gandhi was really a great man 1>Mahatma Gandhi was truly a great man If somebody says I have got job . we say really? but not truly? we say the question paper is reallydifficult but ...
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Why the adverb “lately” is sometimes used with the present progressive?

The following example is from this video. It is at 5 minutes and 48 seconds. You are killing it lately. I am confused because as this dictionary says the adverb is usually used with perfect tenses,...