Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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Always Almost or Almost Always?

Is there any difference between: I always almost burn myself when I cook. I almost always burn myself when I cook.
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In the expression "Elevator up" is "up" a preposition or an adverb?

I know that in this example: is your house up or down the avenue? "up" is a preposition. But is it the same in "elevator up"? it looks different
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Why isn't 'half' an adjective in this sentence?

The following example is from Cambridge dictionary: A: Want some sugar in your coffee? B: Only half a spoon, please They categorise 'only' as an adverb phrase, which I agree with; however, they ...
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"Sometimes" in different positions

Are all three positions of sometimes common in both affirmative and negative sentences? Different native speakers share different opinions. To some the third sentence sounds wrong. Should it be ...
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Don't occasionally/don't sometimes

What are other adverbs that can't be negated just like "sometimes" and "occasionally"? I don't sometimes drink milk. I don't occasionally drink milk.
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Where to place the word "even": 1) "I am amazed even you would choose the day ......" or 2) "I am amazed you would even choose the day ....."

The sentence is from a British drama "Downton abbey". Two sisters are not getting along well. One is trying out new clothes and asking what others think of her clothes when her sister is sad ...
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'very' or 'much' as a modifier for past participle adjectives

I was very surprised. vs. I was much surprised. I was very tired. vs. I was much tired. I was very pleased. vs. I was much pleased. I was very bored. vs. I was much bored. I was very interested. ...
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things to make you anxious

a. He'll tell you things to make you anxious. I think 'to make you anxious' postmodifies 'things'. Would you agree with that? The sentence means: b. He'll tell you things that will make you anxious. ...
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Can we use existential 'there' and 'there' simply as an adverb of place together?

Existential 'there' works as a dummy subject. And, 'there' is also an adverb of place. So, in a situation when I need to use them together it is considered correct or needs rewording to sound natural. ...
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How does 'nominally' an adverb rather than an adjective?

My question regards the following sentences The province is nominally independent. While nominally a film student, Barnett had no aspirations of a career behind the camera. Although 75 per cent of ...
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Are "two times" and "twice" interchangeable?

In English, are twice and two times interchangeable most of the time? I went there twice. I went there two times. Many times, when I use twice, they tell me it's two times. When should I use two ...
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Confusion in 'not' sentences

Read the following sentence. "He didn't play cricket because of Tim" This means he is playing cricket but it is not because of Tim What if i wanna say he is not playing cricket . The reason ...
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using real instead of really

I sometimes hear YouTubers say "something is real good" is it okay to use real instead of really? can I say "I am real proud of you?"
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Do I need "there" in "In my room is a bed"? [closed]

I want to know what is wrong with this sentence. "In my room is a bed." How should I use "there" and why?
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change vs. change up

She changed her daily routine. She changed up her daily routine. They say in U.S. informal English, 'up' is often added to 'change'. Could there be any difference in meaning between 'change' and '...
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Why use an adverb in "an arbitrarily large number"

Why use "arbitrary" as an adverb in the following expression: an arbitrarily large number taken from wiktionary. Where is the verb?
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Where should I put "-ly" in the sentence to make it look natural? [closed]

I want to put the word which is ended 'ly' like 'resolutely', 'emphatically'. Which place is right? End of the sentence or between 'she' and 'objects'? She objects to the proposals. They remain ...
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Succeeding in college often is a challenge for students,______, most college provide services designed to help students

This question came in the Dhaka university admission exam 2018-19. Succeeding in college often is a challenge for students,______, most college provide services designed to help students. (a) ...
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"Move up, John, and let her sit down." (What's the meaning of 'up'?)

"Move up, John, and let her sit down." https://www.collinsdictionary.com/ko/dictionary/english/move-up What's the meaning of 'up' in the sentence above? The speaker presumes that somebody ...
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Difference between "particularly" and "greatly" [closed]

Can you explain what is the difference between the following sentences: Indirect objects are particularly difficult to understand. Indirect objects are greatly difficult to understand. What is the ...
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"are exaggeratedly spreading" or "are spreading exaggeratedly"--which placement of the adverb is correct?

In the phrase "negative comments are exaggeratedly spreading", is the adverb in the correct place? Would "negative comments are spreading exaggeratedly" be incorrect? Both examples ...
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What does meditatively mean? [closed]

What does "meditatively" mean? I found a sentence that goes like: He scratched his beard meditatively. And He looked at me meditatively.
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he was very annoyed

a. He was very much annoyed. b. He was annoyed much. c. He was annoyed very much. I think (b) and (c) sound a bit strange. I think (b) and (c) could mean that he was often annoyed. I think could refer ...
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don't want to die yet

I don't want to die yet. Isn't that sentence ambiguous? I can see two different meanings. I will present each in a context. a) I am in pain, but I can take it. I don't want to die yet. But the pain ...
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Can "where" be omitted in the following?

Can "where" be omitted in situations like these? The waiter carried the order to the table (where) the group was sitting. "We're going to the place (where) you're going to be trained.&...
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Using Adverbs of Frequency in Present Continuous Tense

Usually, when talking about adverbs of frequency, we put them under the topic of "Simple Present Tense". Because in this tense we consider habits and routines and adverbs of frequency are ...
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Which of the two is correct? (A) Having a bad reputation … actually bad. (B) Having a bad reputation … being bad

Which of the two is correct? (A) Having a bad reputation is worse than being actually bad. (B) Having a bad reputation is worse than actually being bad. It is the placement of "actually" ...
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How to use the word "best" as an adverb in this example

Sometimes I come across the adverb "best" and I'd like confirmation of how it should be properly used in this specific case. Please note that I made up the example sentence below. "...
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Is 'so young' an adverb or an adjective in this lyrics 'dying so young'?

I'm listening to a Japanese Anisong's English ver. Eiyu Fate's Song (original title: 英雄 運命の詩) by EGOIST. There is a part of lyrics like this: ''To give up who you are and live without your faith is ...
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Function of "as" in "Something is as what we would like it to be"

Today I've come across an English sentence that is "Something is as we would like it to be." According to English grammar and the context, I think "as" there can only be an adverb ...
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"Say it simple" or "say it simply"

I haven't confused myself about an adjective and an adverb in a long time, but this one really got me. I am trying to say: "Say it, using simple language, with one clear message." In short: &...
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How to state "as I had no other choice" adverbially?

I am looking for an adverb which can be substituted for the following phrase defined within double quotation: Example 1) She said: I was s far away from my apartment and had lost my wallet. I didn't ...
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Using "thereby" to express concurrency

I'm currently reviewing a thesis by a student who's native language is German (like mine as well). They are often using "thereby" to express concurrency, as in Fritz walked down the street; ...
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Using a comma with "and that" and so then" (adverb vs conjunctions): The human race has one really effective weapon, and that is laughter

I saw many examples using "and that". I was confused with the use of a comma before it in the middle of the sentence. In the case of independent sentences, some examples do not have a come ...
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To develop 'Global leading' or to develop 'Globally leading' products? That is the question

I am writing a piece on a company which "strives to develop global leading products". Something irks me about this phrasing, and Grammarly keeps helpfully reminding me that this adverbial (...
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Do we not normally use "also" in negative sentences?

Not only have I had enough with him, but I also don't care about him anymore. My sentence above has been corrected for me like this: Not only have I had enough of him, but I also don't care about ...
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Easily or Easier

'Self-regulation is easier said than done' Since 'said' is a verb why 'easily', an adverb is not used? 'Easier can only precede 'said' if 'said' anyhow working as a noun but that seems very far-...
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'To be taken serious' or 'to be taken seriously'

The following sentence is from an essay written by a British who is also an former IELTS examiner. ''Global warming should be taken more serious as it can result in a number of disastrous consequences....
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proper usage of "half this, half that"

One of the ways to describe a mixed feeling is to use a pattern with half. For example: I stood there half frightened, half exasperated. and I was wondering if it's common to use as long as a ...
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what's the meaning/function of *up* in this sentence? (they were *up* visiting from Louisiana...)

Below is an excerpt of a script for a CNN news clip. There are dozens of lifelike wooden penguins made by a local artist displayed in the middle of town and people passing by are absolutely enjoying ...
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Adverb placement: is it rule based or just how you use the symbol

10 years ago/later, which is 2010, the Avengers fought/ fights the villian Thanos. who else wants the burger? why else would he do that? Why are the adverbs later, ago, and else placed after 10 years, ...
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"People move westwards." vs "People move to west.". Are they both correct?

The following sentence is quoted from the BBC web site about how people leave their homes because of war. People move westwards. But, in our daily life, we would say, "People move to the west&...
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QUITE AND MUCH + SUPERLATIVE ADJECTIVES

It´s possible to use "much" and "quite" as adverbs of degree in front of superlative adjectives?
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The usage of adv + can

Some People say can only have same meaning as only can, and some not. So I want to make it clear. I only can get it. Does the sentence mean: I am the the only one who can get it? So, how do I ...
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Are "open" and "empty" adverbs in "The food bins are broken open and empty."?

The food bins are broken open and empty. The words "open" and "empty" in the above mentioned sentence seem like adjectives, but in another sense they modify the verb "broken&...
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What's the meaning of "take it any further"?

I can't understand the meaning of "take that thought any further" in the sentence: A: You can't stay in a hostel. They're for backpackers and drunks. B: Yeah. Maybe don't take that thought ...
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double vs twice the normal price

Do double and twice have the same meaning? Can they be used interchangeably? I'll pay you double the normal price if you drive me there at 2 in the morning. I'll pay you twice the normal price if ...
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Can we consider (a bit) as a noun phrase in this sentence?

It’s a bit early to come to school. A bit here is an adverb as it means a little. (A bit) here can it be a noun phrase by itself even if it is not headed by a noun?
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Can "ditto" be similar to "also" and "as well as"?

First definition from Learner's dictionary says ditto is used to say that whatever you have said about one person or thing is also true of another person or thing E.g. He is good at baseball, ditto ...
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“A Few years ago” VS “A few years before”

In conservations,when people talk about their past. They convey like this: “A few years ago”, I moved in here with my family,or I moved in here with my family “ a few years before”. Do they convey the ...
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