Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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Question about adverbial phrase

I want to move here San Pedro. I want to move here in San Pedro. Which one is grammatically correct and why?
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Can I put the adverb “exponentially” after the intransitive main verb “grown” when the auxiliary verb “had” precedes the intransitive main verb?

Can I put the adverb "exponentially" after the intransitive main verb "grown" when the auxiliary verb "had" precedes the intransitive main verb "grown"? (...
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What part of speech is up in the sentence, the time is up

This sentence, the time is up, is confusing me. I think up is a preposition
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“to be keenly interested in”

It is correct to use "to be keenly interested in", but "to be keen on sth" means "to be interested in sth", and so, isn't it essentially saying "interestedly ...
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In the case that adverbs don’t modify verbs

For example, ‘I run happily.’ I notice that doesn’t mean running is happy, but I run, being happy. However why is it called ‘verb modifier’? Do I misunderstand adverbs?
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1answer
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the adverb between verb and preposition

A example: I care more about others and I care about others more Is there any difference between both sentences? for first sentence: Does more modifies verb care or prep about ? for second ...
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1answer
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about the position of adverb `ever`

A example: I don't think I'll ever go there and the alternative: I don't think I'll go there ever And I wanna know is there any difference between both sentences? Furthermore, I don't know whether ...
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3answers
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Which of these sentences with the adverb “ever” are correct?

We always say: I have never been to London. But is it possible to say: I haven't ever been to London. Or I haven't been to London. The task was: Find a mistake in the following sentence: "...
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1answer
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Is the word “by” being used as a preposition or adverb in “Sort by extension”?

In the short sentence "Sort by extension.", is the word "by" being used as a preposition or an adverb? When I look it up in an English dictionary, one of the examples inclines me ...
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Usage of twice-twice-broken-glass

Glass has been broken twice and there exists twice-broken glass twice. Is twice-twice-broken glass a proper expression?
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Can I use the word “thereof” at the beginning of a sentence?

I know the general meaning and use of the word "thereof" in a sentence, but I was wondering if the word could be used at the beginning of a sentence like in the following example. (I didn't ...
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Participle as Adverb

Is it possible (and common) to use a participle as an adverb? Examples: The damp walls looming overgrown and ruggedly out of the water bear witness to ancient grandeur. (In this case, the adverb ...
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1answer
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Does “located off to” mean “located closer to”?

I am trying to describe the positional relationship between the rectangle and the circle in the image. When my language is literally translated in English, it is described as follows: The circle is ...
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Demonstratives + adverbs of frequency + adjective/participle + noun

Demonstrative pronouns are determiners used instead of nouns to refer to things and identify their position and distance from the speaker. Then, if I want to use 'this always-walking guy,' should I (...
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Nouns used with particles

I saw 'way back,' 'way up' 'way down' 'way out' kind of things. Then can I say 'road in,' 'door out' and so on?
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1answer
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How idiomatic is “He cooks badly” vs. “He doesn't cook well” & “He cooks poorly”?

How idiomatic is "He cooks badly" vs. "He doesn't cook well" & "He cooks poorly"?
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How quickly is she running towards the exit? = How fast is she running towards the exit? [closed]

What is the difference in meaning between How quickly is she running towards the exit? and How fast is she running towards the exit? Is the following dialogue ok: - How soon can she drive here? - She ...
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Upstairs/The floors above

Will: Two men have been found dead upstairs. If will is on the 6th floor of an office building, while the two men have been found dead on the 8th and 9th floor respectively, could I use "upstairs&...
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1answer
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ever and never exercise [closed]

https://www.perfect-english-grammar.com/ever-and-never-exercise-1.html I don’t understand these sentences If you ever come to the UK, give me a call! This is the best party I've ever been to Do I ...
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Is there any differences in two sentences?

Here are two sentences below. I would have taken a lot for her to say that. I would have taken her a lot to say that. The position of 'a lot' makes the difference?
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How do we use 'pretty much" in this sentence?

You would succeed in pretty much everything. I wonder what is the part of speech of 'pretty much', which part does it modify? 'succeed' or 'everything'? In my point of view, it modifies 'everything', ...
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How to use “most” or “the most” after a verb? [duplicate]

I can't make out which one of these questions is correct: "What impressed him most?" or "what impressed him the most?" If both are correct, what is the difference in meaning and ...
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2answers
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MOVEMENTS with “back” vs “backward(s)”

Imagine you're a personal trainer and you're explaining how to do an exercise. For example, you have a choice of two sentences: Bring/draw/etc. your leg/arm/pelvis/etc. backward(s). Bring/draw/etc. ...
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Adverb of frequncy, word order question

I’m an English teacher of young learners. I ‘ve got a question about a sentence from an online present simple exercise: Here is the example: (she / dance often)? That's the correct answer given by the ...
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Can “Then” be used at the beginning of a sentence like “ And”?

This device includes components A and B. A has element c and d. Then, B has element e and f. I would like to know whether Then" in the sentence above I created is used correctly. You may think &...
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Only how clause

A. We no longer worry about only how to stay alive ; we now worry about working for a living and how to spend our spare time . B. Older print publication systems had no capability to know what the ...
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2answers
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The sentence “I just have noticed now […]”, tense and adverbial constructions

The phrase I just noticed now [...] seems to be quite common, as a google query reveals. However, I am wondering why is simple past used here, and also why not "justly" instead of "...
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Putting “only” in front of a clause in order for “only” to be focused on the clause

If the focus is a whole clause, we can put only in front position: Ex) My arm hurts but only when I try to raise it. I just came across this explanation above in this link : https://www.google.com/amp/...
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Is 'I'm' a verb, noun, adjective, or adverb? [closed]

I am currently doing my online work, and I was sorting verbs, nouns, adjectives and adverbs. I was doing well, until 'I'm' came up. I would really appreciate it if someone could answer my question, is ...
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“short” vs “shortly” as adjective

"Short" seems to have two adverbs, "short" and "shortly", with different meanings. The first seems to be used primarily idiomatically ("he stopped short"), but ...
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1answer
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no later than ~ VS by no later than ~

I am familiar with "no later than"". However, I have seen "by no later than". As far as I know, "no later than" has meaning as follows. ​by a particular time and ...
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1answer
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Question About adveral clause

The things as they are expected to help us, As sentence above, I heard that 'as clause' is a adverbal clause, but I want to know that what someone said is right, that is, This adverbal clause modifies ...
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2answers
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Is there any difference in meaning between “still” and “so far” when used in negative present perfect sentences?

Could you please tell me if there is any difference in meaning between still and so far when used in negative present perfect sentences? For example: So far I haven't found a job. I still haven't ...
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1answer
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Adverb or Adjective?

How to use and differentiate between linking verb and main verb? For example, in the below sentences, should I use adjective or adverb: He did great / greatly. She dances amazing / amazingly. He ...
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2answers
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Is there any difference between “already” and “now” when used with the present perfect?

Could you tell me if there is any difference between already and now when used with the present perfect? For example: I have already had five tablets, so I know a thing or two about them. I have had ...
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Can I use “carefully” and “cautiously” interchangeably in this context?

She carefully/cautiously stepped back to the body, grabbed the gun, and ran out of the room. I can't figure out if I should use "carefully" or "cautiously" in this context. Are ...
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1answer
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to transfer to or for transfer to

Which of these examples is correct? As she prepares for her transfer to a new academy to pursue her formation or As she prepares to transfer to a new academy to pursue her formation
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I don't think I was fairly treated, but “then” that's life, isn't it?

What is "then" here? I can hardly understand the "then" here. "Then" means at a particular time in the past or in the future.
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1answer
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Conditional type 2 with an adverb of time

Is it possible to use conditional type 2 with an adverb of time and would it change its meaning? For example: What would you do if you lost your job? comparing to: What would you do if you lost ...
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1answer
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“Goes to”/“Goes over to”

Alan sees Mary standing at the other end of the bar. He goes (over) to her and says "hi". Would it sound odd if I didn't add "over" in this sentence?
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What is the function of “unmodified” in “It is passed unmodified to the next block”?

What I have learnt so far, an adverb can be placed adjacent to a verb. For example, It is directly passed to the next block. or It is passed directly to the next block. I found a sentence as ...
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1answer
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believe wholeheartedly [closed]

Does (1) sound natural in English? What we believe wholeheartedly is not necessarily the truth. What we believe with all our hearts is not necessarily the truth.
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Is crorrect and natural to say “don't do something nearly as much as someone”?

Could you tell me if it is crorrect and natural to say don't do something nearly as someone? For example: Sara doesn't eat nearly as much sugar as you. What I'm trying to say that Sara eats a lot ...
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Applying adjective/adverb to nouns/verbs in a conjunction sentence

Take this simple sentence for example: I like dogs and cats. Which means I like dogs and I like cats. Simple. What if I add an adjective "big" before the word "dogs"?: I like big ...
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2answers
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Adjective or Adverb?

When someone asks "How are you doing?". Is it: I am doing bad. I am doing badly. Though I always hear the first one, I think the second is more correct because here, doing acts as a verb(...
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2answers
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What is the importance of “however” in this specific sentence?

Kindly read the last sentence of this paragraph: "In the 1920s, a German named Adi Dassler created a new sneaker brand that he named after himself: Adidas. His brother, Rudi, later started his ...
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2answers
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Can I use adverbs in a different way?

1. "Something scientifically in white helps to avoid car accidents." 2. "Something in white helps to avoid car accident scientifically because clothes are bright." 1 means that ...
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kind of VS a little

While I was learning "kind of" and "a little" based on the below captured meanings, I realized the below points. (1) "kind of" can be placed before verbs and after be-...
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Can we say “x is almost double y” if x is more than y doubled?

I just read a sentence in an English lesson: Male winnings were almost triple those of female earnings. (Talking about male vs female earnings in a golf competition). However, the graph shows that ...
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Why is it “you look beautiful” and not “you look beautifully”? [duplicate]

You look beautiful "Beautiful" is an adjective here. We often use "adverbs" to modify "verbs". Here the verb is "look" and instead of an adverb, we have an ...

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