Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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1answer
28 views

I just have done or I have just done

are both of "I just have done" and "I have just done" correct? I guess the first sentence is more informal but grammatically correct.
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How to differentiate "this" and "that" to mean "so"?

I'm confused about differentiating these "this" and "that" when they're used to mean "so". E.g. Can you tell me why you're this angry? Can you tell me why you're that ...
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35 views

I have yet to see the results

I have yet to see the results. What does this sentence mean? I can understand it without "yet". But with "yet", it puzzles me. Does it mean I haven't yet seen the results. If it ...
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1answer
19 views

Jane's often visited the museums before

What's the difference between these two sentences? Are "in the past" and "before" used interchangeably? Jane's often visited the museums in the past. Jane's often visited the ...
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0answers
18 views

"Now I don't" vs "I don't anymore"

What's the difference between these sentences? Group A I used to travel by train, but now I don't. I used to travel by train, but I don't anymore. Group B I used to have trouble with my sleep, but ...
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1answer
40 views

in the past /before in present perfect and past simple

Does "in the past" work well both in the past simple and present perfect? Does "before" work better in the present perfect than in the past simple? Here are four groups of ...
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1answer
136 views

You don't sometimes hate them

This sentence is from "English File" by Clive Oxenden, and Christina Latham-Koenig. I am confused by their use of "sometimes". I remember being told by a native speaker that it's ...
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4answers
617 views

What is the function of "there" in the structure, "There is/are/..."?

In the following sentence, what are the form and function of the word "there"? There were fifteen cats and an eviction notice on Janet's front porch. My answer was this: Form: adverb of ...
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1answer
38 views

He never believed Peter before

He never believed Peter until now. I think it indicates a change: He begins to believe Peter now. However, in the following sentence, is there a change implied? He never believed Peter before.
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I've hunted a wild boar before

I've hunted a wild boar before. The word "before" implies 1) I'm currently hunting a wild boar or 2) I'm planning to hunt one soon. But can it imply something else? Let me give you two ...
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0answers
20 views

Correct usage of only

I read this rule somewhere: Only can be used before a verb though it may put emphasis on a noun used later in the sentence Is it true? For example, is this sentence correct? Although he only earns ...
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1answer
305 views

This computer's always belonged to me

The word "never" negates all the time, and any time up to now in the present perfect tense. This computer's never belonged to me. If I want to express the opposite of the meaning, which ...
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1answer
40 views

is fond of driving fast / is fond of fast driving / is fond of driving too fast

Obviously, the driver is fond of driving fast. (here: fast - adverb) Obviously, the driver is fond of fast driving. (here: fast - adjective) If I understand correctly, the second version is more ...
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1answer
14 views

Can a sentence adverb function as a focusing adverb?

He plays soccer, surprisingly, at home. Does it mean different from “surprisingly, he plays soccer at home” or “he, surprisingly, plays soccer at home”? Precisely saying, does “surprisingly” focus on ...
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Can adverbial phrases and clauses modify an entire clause?

A sentence adverb modifies an entire sentence. Here is a basic example: [1] Surprisingly, the sun had already set. However, my question refers to phrases and clauses that function adverbially. In ...
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19 views

Barely have enough/have barely enough

Is there any difference in meaning between the following two sentences? They barely have enough money to afford a new phone. They have barely enough money to afford a new phone. Additionally, do ...
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1answer
37 views

What is the difference between quick and quickly when both of them are meant as adverbs?

This page is taken out of quite a respectable book. It's 'Grammar and vocabulary for First Certificate'. The table demonstrates that there are two adverbs quick and quickly, but it provides no ...
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2answers
40 views

Can we say 'pathetically grateful'?

This problem is originated from an app I'm using for learning English called Grammar English. The question and the options: John was just __ grateful that all his friends bothered to read his first ...
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39 views

Can "notwithstanding" be used without a complement?

I have checked Cambridge Dictionary, Longman, and Merriam-Webster, but I fail to find a conclusive answer to whether notwithstanding can be used without a complement. According to Merriam-Webster, it ...
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1answer
24 views

Can't do it just like that

a. You can't carry out a scientific experiment just like that. You need to use the proper method. or b. You can't carry out a scientific experiment in any old manner. You need to use the proper ...
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1answer
36 views

Which sentence is correct? (Had vs has)

"After a client had performed Step 1 but HAD not performed Step 2, he/she will.." OR "After a client had performed Step 1 but HAS not performed Step 2, he/she will.." I think ...
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1answer
25 views

Wasn't simply a case of negligence

a. The management says that the fire started because a technician was negligent. But it wasn't only a case of a technician being negligent. The whole system was flawed. b. The management says that the ...
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2answers
26 views

"therefore" to connect two sentences

The following is taken from a reworked version of an article where some sentences have been reordered. Do you think "therefore" properly connects the sentences? The “sweet spot” for sleep ...
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5answers
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Isn’t ‘approximately’ an adverb?

‘Approximately’ is an adverb and modifies a verb. Does that mean for example that ‘approximately five people’ refers to five people until there’s a verb included? So my answer is: ‘approximately five ...
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1answer
21 views

Much + Noun nuance (this much earth surface)

What does "much" add in this construction? This much earth surface has to fit onto this much map surface compared to This earth surface has to fit onto this map surface Context: I found ...
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2answers
27 views

do the work anyway [closed]

a. You will have to do the work anyway. I think here 'anyway' means 'in any case', but could it also mean 'in any manner you can'? Is the sentence ambiguous?
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1answer
51 views

Twice more than

I read the reports twice more than you. I read twice more reports than you. I thought there are difference between two sentences. The first one means the number of the reports is twice more than the ...
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1answer
43 views

How can "How do you play tennis often?" be rephrased?

How can "How do you play tennis often?" be rephrased: "In what way do you often play tennis?" "How do you manage to play tennis (so) often?" "How come you play ...
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1answer
39 views

‘I gave three people an egg each.’

I want to ask about how focusing adverbs change meanings of nouns or noun phrases. First off, ‘approximately 99 degrees’ in ‘water boils at approximately 99 degrees’ means ‘100 degrees.’ Likewise, ...
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1answer
41 views

'Not yet' or 'Never yet'

What's the difference between usage of 'Not yet' and 'Never yet' in the following sentences.. I've not yet tasted it. I've never yet tasted it. And is the second sentence grammatically valid?
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‘We didn’t get ten points each.’

I got ten points, but you didn’t get ten points. In this case, can I use sentence ‘we didn’t get ten points each’? Or does it mean both of us didn’t get ten points?
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24 views

From (every / any / all) angles

Could anyone possibly let me know which collocation below sounds better in English? Apparently, you have decided to cooperate with them! Your manager don't seem to be a reliable person. Well, even ...
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0answers
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Why is 'else' categorised as an adverb? [duplicate]

In multiple dictionaries (such as Cambridge, Merriam Webster, and Macmillan) the word 'else' can be categorised as an adverb. Why is this? I would've assumed that 'else' was a postpositive adjective, ...
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14 views

more than usually

Can one use (a) instead of (b)? a. He worked more rapidly than usually. b. He worked more rapidly than he usually does. I use (b). I am not sure (a) is correct.
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3answers
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Is "the" an adverb or an adjective?

I read an article that states that the definite article "the" is an adjective before nouns the ball and is an adverb before superlative adjectives the best player What is its type (part ...
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1answer
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"In a surprised way" or "In wonder" or

I ran for her and put my hand on her shoulder and called Sarah (my wife's name), but immediately, I found out that I had mistaken another woman for my wife! When the woman turned around I said: "...
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Alone among the animals on the farm he never laughed

I don't quite understand this sentence, especially the word order. The problem is that what part of the sentence does "alone" modify? Is it "he"? If I understand it right, can this ...
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1answer
8 views

Separately or individually, which can indicate one to one relationship?

The pair of cables are each connected to a different one of the pair of ports. I am trying to rewrite the sentence above I created into a simpler form by using an adverb . Which of the following can ...
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2answers
40 views

Can a present participle function adverbially?

She hit the ground running. He went flying. In these two examples, the present participles 'running' and 'flying' are clearly modifying their respective verbs. 'Running' complements 'hit', and '...
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1answer
23 views

Is "where" in "place where" redundant?

Example sentence: We're heading to the place (where) you're going to have your next challenge. Is where redundant in situations like this? Why or why not?
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53 views

Using "Much" with a gerund

Much walking was necessary.​ "Much" as a determiner (quantifier) is used in negative sentences or questions, but it can be used in positive ones though it's formal or unnatural. However, in ...
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Subtle meaning difference in usage of adverb vs adjective in here

our current vague knowledge our currently vague knowledge As far as I know the two above phrases are grammatically correct. In the first one both adjectives "current" and "vague" ...
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are sharply and steadily opposite?

Is this natural to say that something is changing sharply and steadily? Prices have been climbing sharply and steadily. In this sentence I want to say that prices increase sharply, not gradually. At ...
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29 views

"Apart from": exсlusion or inclusion?

Some people say that apart from means inclusion (example 1), and some say that it means exclusion (example 2). Apart from being a good husband, he is also a good father. It means he is a good husband ...
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42 views

His wishes still haven't come true

Can I use "still" before "haven't" or after "haven't" or at the end of the sentence? "His wishes still haven't come true." "His wishes haven't come true ...
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1answer
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In general, can we subsititute adverbs with 'on a ... basis' when used to modify *some* adjectives?

This question leaped to my mind after reading the definition of basis, especially in this sense: on a … basis the way things are organized or arranged; how often something happens (1). In relation ...
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726 views

I don't sometimes drink tea

Why don't native speakers use "sometimes" between verbs? "I don't sometimes drink tea."
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39 views

Where the adverb of manner could be placed in this sentence

I'm looking for information about the position of adverbs of manner in a sentence. I looked up several pages related to adverb placements here, here, here and here. As I understood, adverbs of manner ...
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1answer
58 views

"Before" as an adverb

I have a question regarding the use of "before" as an adverb. In the following examples, what word or words does "before" modify? As an adverb, it should modify either a verb, an ...
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36 views

Whether however or though

Wild monkeys are a problem for many areas in Japan. Every year they cause heavy damage to crops._______ the farmers are fighting back. In the above blank whether though or however should be used. I am ...

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