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Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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To adverb or not to adverb? How about using a postpostive adjective?

I'm not sure what's up with this sentence, but I'm debating whether or not I should use an adverb here. 1) Not only do antipsychotics have debilitating side effects ranging from tardive dyskinesia,...
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Why isn’t “reasonable” used in “The landlords raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and REASONABLY so”?

Could somebody explain me why we use reasonably instead of reasonable: The landlords raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and reasonably so. Quite confuse this grammar.
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He arrived “breathless” at the top of the stairs

I came across this sentence when I looked up the word breathless in OALD: He arrived breathless at the top of the stairs. Why don’t they use breathlessly? I’ve learnt that there are some verbs ...
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Usage of ''as'' before adjective

Can I use "as" to make adjective into adverb like examples below: 1) I always think as different from other people. 2) I always think differently from other people. Are both sentences have same ...
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Can an adverb modify gerund phrases and infinitive phrases?

Can an adverb modify gerund phrases and infinitive phrases? The adverb ‘well’ is modifying the gerund phrase ‘speaking five languages’ or just ‘speaking’ and same for the infinitive phrase ‘to speak ...
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Stripped off half its gear/stripped half of its gear

Let's say you are selling a game character online equipped with 10 pieces of gear. You posted it trying to sell it online. And then a potential buyer messaged you saying: (after checking if the ...
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I have a little bit confusion in the following answer that is given in a book

Violence takes a heavy toll and affects public life ____ . Options - Best/worst/hardly/rarely. Answer is "Best" . But how can it be instead of worst????
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“so” or “such” to replace a preceding adjective

I'd like to know whether "so" or "such" is correct in the following: Those actors were not hired because they all looked indistinct or were regarded as such. Those actors were not hired ...
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The most used + Noun VS Noun + is used the most

Are both of the following sentences grammatical and interchangeable? 'The' is the most used word. Word 'the' is used the most.
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“Often” as complement of BE

Often is an adverb according to Oxford Dictionaries Online. ADVERB 1 Frequently; many times. 'he often goes for long walks by himself' 'how often do you have your hair cut?' 1.1 ...
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Present Perfect + Adverb

What is the correct form of this sentence: "I have bought another product meanwhile"? Thanks!
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Like/as meaning difference in given context

He treated me like a dog. He treated me as a dog. Here, do both sentences mean different things? Are as and like interchangeable here?
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What does “over” mean in “in the next row over”?

What does "over" mean in the following excerpt? And I wish I could get a stone closer to them. God love my sister, but she got the stone in the next row over when she heard I was looking around for ...
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“She very wants to do it” instead of “She wants to do it very much”

Is the sentence "She very wants to do it." could be correct in a meaning of: She wants to do it very much. ? I mean to ask if it is a grammatical sentence at all.
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“simply can not be” or “can not simply be”

I am looking into adverb order in sentences and came across the following one; There are things in this world which [simply cannot be] / [cannot simply be] expressed in the form of words. Google-...
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What does “still” mean here?

How fast should you read? The answer depends on what you are reading. Sometimes you need to read things slowly and carefully. At other times, you can read quickly, and at still other times, you ...
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Where to place the adverb?

Im very confused about the answer provided by a grammarbook. This is a exercise regarding adverbs. In the exercise, I am supposed to rewrite the sentence in a correct order. Case 1 My answer: ...
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Best position for an adverb in a sentence

Consider the following sentences: I currently work as a soccer coach and have helped a number of players to considerably improve their technique. or I currently work as a soccer coach and have ...
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The verb after “thereby”

I wrote: This may be important in the context of anionic complexes extraction from water because the positive potential on the interface attracts anionic complexes to the interface, thereby ...
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Should I choose “I already belong to a museum” or “I belong to a museum already”?

Is this sentence grammatical and semantic correct? I feel like I already belong to a museum! or I feel like I belong to a museum already! or it should be something completely different?
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“as great as has”

Which sentence is more correct and why? Einstein is as great a scientest as HAS ever lived. Or, Einstein is as great a scientist as ever lived.
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Adverb for the number of people

Is there an adverb in English that can be used to refer to the number of people who do an action? For example we say Henry, Frank and Alex pulled the heavy box together. Is there a structure like ...
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“Off” VS. “Off something”

1) Spend a hundred dollars and get 10% off 2) Approximately, on Black Friday you get 25% off any item you buy. As I know, that most prepositions have dual functions: as a preposition if it is ...
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Proper use of 'there'

There is an adverb but in the following sentence as pronoun. It first said he left the mission freely, contradicting Turkish media reports that he was murdered in there. Is this correct?
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On a strictly cash basis

Can anyone explain why we say on a strictly cash basis (and not strict)? Is cash here an adjective? Is cash basis a noun phrase or compound noun?
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“surely” vs. “really"

This really looks bad. vs. This surely looks bad. What is the difference between the adverbs surely and really? Don’t they both lay emphasis on certainity? Also: You surely do know how ...
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Is LESS is a Adjective or Adverb in the particular context

You are paying less attention to your studies than you used to do. What is “less” in this sentence? A. Noun B. Verb C. Adverb D. Adjective I was studying English mcqs at a particular website which ...
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What does the adverb “out” in the sentence “We lease the land out to the forestry people” mean?

According to the dictionary: We can say "to lease something to somebody" or "lease something out to somebody" Eg: We lease the land to the forestry people. We lease the land out to the ...
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Wrongfully accused or wrongly accused?

In a court, when a person is convicted but is wrong or misjudged. Do you say: He/she is wrongfully convicted. Or He/she is wrongly convicted. A Briton writer has used "wrongly", which has made ...
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Which part of speech is “left” in this sentence?

I've always thought (perhaps, erroneously) that if there is some ambiguity in determining whether the given word is an adjective or a past participle, you need to look at whether the "source" of ...
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What does 'so' actually indicate?

There's God, so here's humans. (Meaning the reason humans exist here is that God exists there) Is it indicating 'is' here? As 'so' is classified as adverb, there seems to be no words other than '...
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Is “Aloud Reading”correct?

I was about to read a term paper written by a non-native student of English comparing between two types of reading. Then I noticed that the author started the title with ("Aloud Reading" and Silent ...
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'barely' or 'plainly' in this sentence

Can we use 'barely' or 'plainly' in this sentence? The chairman needn't even count the number of people who just raised their hands, as they were ______________ the majority.
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Is there difference in meaning between these three sentences?

Is there difference in meaning between these three sentences? He was working less hard than it's usual. He was working less hard than usual. He was working less hard than usually.
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What does “generally” refer to in this sentence?

We can see why the non-reductive understanding of the computational theory fits into scientific theorizing generally. What is the reference of "generally" exactly? Fits or theorizing?
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down: along or towards a lower point? [duplicate]

While driving down the street, Carlos sees a girl on a bicycle. Is it correct to assume that Carlos was driving along the street if the context didn't provide any information about the landscape? Or ...
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How to describe a positional relationship between two objects with respect to a certain direction?

I am trying to describe the positional relationship between the red circle and the green triangle with reference to direction A indicated by the blue arrow. I thought of two examples: The red ...
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Never in the present perfect and the past perfect

After another grammar repetition, I started thinking about adverb 'never' in the present participle and past participle. The rules say that using 'never' in the tenses is possible, but what is the ...
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Should it be “carefully” instead of “careful” in this sentence?

He paused outside the doors, taking stock of his men, careful not to give any sign of his thoughts. (source) My understanding is the phrase "careful not to give any sign of his thoughts" is an ...
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Why can't we use “almost” and “quite” together? (My textbook says we can't)

I came to know that "almost" and "quite" are not used together. But I don't get the reason why these two words can't be together. In my textbook, it's written that quite and almost both are adverbs ...
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I ALWAYS think that. What's the meaning of ALWAYS in that structure?

I wonder what's the meaning that "ALWAYS" is trying to convey when used in simple present sentences such as: I always think that John should stop drinking. I always think that Victoria lies too ...
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“taste different” or “taste differently”? [duplicate]

Tell me please if it correct different or differently in the following sentence. But eggs can taste different/differently depending on how fresh they are, the way they're cooked and the diet of the ...
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actual and actually

Is there any practical difference between the following sentences? a. That's the actual reason I'm going. b. That's the reason I'm actually going. I'd appreciate your help.
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How frequent or how frequently?

What would be the correct grammar? Should I use adverb after how? How frequent you do this? or How frequently you do this?
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Application to identify parts of speech

I’m helping my third grader with grammar homework and have differing opinions with some solutions provided to her. Is there an app where we can input sentences and they’ll identify different parts of ...
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In the way or the way

“Eat the Greek way” vs. “Eat in the Greek way” Are these sentences both correct? Have they the same meaning? Is there a difference in the grammar structure? Is there a rule that explains when to ...
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This is often vs This often is

Is it correct to write This often is done for something. rather than This is often done for something.
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What is the difference between “ required” and “ need” ? And which is the right place/situation to use this?

Usually when I talk and write a mail I am doubtful to use " required" or " need" for the situation. please help me clear understanding of the place and situation to use it properly. Thanks in advance.
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Is a preposition + an adverb a possible pattern in the English language?

Is a preposition + an adverb a possible pattern in the English language? An example sentence I know you from somewhere.
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What would “waiting” and “for” be in in terms of parts of speech in this sentence?

The sentence is, > So you have come? I have been anxiously waiting for you "Waiting" in this sentence will be a noun or a verb? I believe it is a verb because it the person is doing something here ...