Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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What's the adverb to unencrypted?

"This data must always be stored securely and never unencryptedly, i.e. never store this data in an unencrypted fashion"? Is there an adverb for unencrypted?
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for long vs. for a long time

I have not heard from him for long or for a long time. Can I use for long and for a long time in the above sentence interchangeably? Or do these phrases have different meaning and usage?
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The sentence is: I only drink English tea. Is only an adjective or adverb in this case?

Is "only" in this sentence an adjective or an adverb? The sentence is: I only drink English tea. Please explain why, because I would like to know so I could learn about it. I know that, for example, ...
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the position of “necessarily”

An ELL post says That doesn't mean I necessarily am going to buy a Ferrari, it's just an option. If I said "If I won a million dollars I would buy a Ferrari", I mean that I necessarily am going to ...
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What type of adverbs “ideally” is?

In one of my posts (Adverb: the cornea "ideally should be perfectly" round like a ping-pong ball) I said the cornea ideally should be perfectly round like a ping-pong ball I am pretty ...
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Is “gasping” an adjective, adverb, or neither?

Is "gasping" an adjective, adverb, or neither?
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Can I use “short” instead of “less”?

I earn three times less this year. I earn three times short this year. Would it means the same if I use short instead of less. I know it is not exactly same but would it be understood what try ...
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Adverb or Noun?

I was taught that if there is only a single word after a preposition, it must be a Noun. For example, Our blessings come from above. If I was taught right, the word above after the preposition ...
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1answer
30 views

“Give something something free” or “give someone something for free”?

Tell me please if there is any difference between the following sentences. Kate gave me her phone free. Kate gave me her phone for free. If there is no difference, then which one is more ...
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Use if “there” in a question?

I need to know what kind of stores or entertainment i can find on Broadway. Should I ask: "What is there on Broadway?" or "What is on Broadway?" Can "there" be used in a question?
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“Either” as an adverb in a negative sentence which its verb is positive

According to the following mentioned structure of using Either as an adverb, I'm going to use either in my sentence which has not a negative verb however its meaning is negative. Either as an ...
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Adverb and adjective in sentences

As he didn’t like meal he want to make a few dollars short payment. As he didn’t like meal he want to make payment a few dollars shor . Is there any difference between two sentence. I thought ...
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'Almost' between the verb and the object

I wonder if I can use the adverb 'almost' between the verb and the object. Can I write, I ate almost the whole fish. or do I have to write, I almost ate the whole fish. It appears to me both ...
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Is it correct and natural to use the name of washing cycles on a washer as adverbs when you wash something?

Is it correct and natural to use the name of washing cycles on a washer as adverbs when you wash something? For example: If you don't want to ruin your shirt, wash it delicate. If you want ...
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What type of adverbs “also” is?

I found lots of people using "You can also", more than 1k hits only on ELL. And myself use "also" a lot as well. However, after I went through 2 posts and one grammar dictionary, I still don't know ...
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“are both” vs. “both are”

In my another post ("time adverbs" vs. "adverbs of time") I said I suppose these 2 sentences are both grammatical and idiomatic. I guess the sentence above is grammatical. I ...
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Is it correct to say “…generate the report more efficient, accuracy and objective. ”

Is it grammatically correct to say: "It helps staff to generate the report more efficient, accuracy and objective. " or it should be changed to It helps staff to generate the report more ...
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Unabated can be adverb?

I think that rage is verb so the following word should be adv. —> unabatedly. Plus, rage isn’t linking v. 🤔 Thank you for your explanation in advance.
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was bruised too

a. His leg was broken. His arm was bruised too. b. His leg was broken. His arm was bruised as well. c. His leg was broken. His arm was also bruised. Are the above sentences grammatically correct ...
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*Slowing* gaining strength_ What part of speech is 'slowing' in the phrases below?

I thought the authors misused the word 'slowing', because it seems that 'slowly' as an adverb should be used. However, there are multiple examples using slowing + gaining + something(noun). Really ...
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Confused in the usage of only in a sentence

I only stare at pretty girls I stare only at pretty girls One of the answers helped me understand using only in different sentences but I am unable to figure out the exact difference between the ...
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1answer
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Which one is more natural: “cut bread thin”, “cut up bread thin”, “cut bread thinly” or “cut up bread thinly”?

Tell me please which of the following sentence sounds the most natural. You have to cut the bread thin. You have to cut up the bread thin. You have to cut the bread thinly. You have ...
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1answer
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Is it idiomatic to say “he wakes up early always” or “he wakes up always early”?

I guess these 3 sentences are all idiomatic. He always wakes up early He usually wakes up early He wakes up early usually However, I am not so sure if these 2 sentences are idiomatic he wakes up ...
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“Anymore” in “Are you going to use it anymore?”

Let's say I am in a hostel's kitchen. And I need a knife, but there is only one knife and it is taken. The guy has just chopped up his vegetables and now he is just holding it. Is it natural and ...
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Is it natural to use the word “cheaper” as an adverb?

Is it natural and correct to use the word cheaper as an adverb. For example: You have to pay a lot of money to have your phone fixed at the repair shop. I will do it cheaper.
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Should the following sentence use “not surprising” or “not surprisingly”?

He hadn't arrived yet. Not surprising/surprisingly. It was too early. I think it can go both ways? Maybe the sentence could mean: Not surprisingly, he hadn't arrived yet. Or: He hadn't ...
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Real good time or really good time

Which one of the following two sentences is correct? They have had a real good time. They have had a really good time. I think both of them are correct because real can also be used as ...
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what is the role of “more” here?

1- It more than doubles during these day rather one year ago. 2- they have reached 50 or more doubles in a season. Are they adverb?
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“as mentioned earlier” or “as mentioning earlier”

I have recently been reading reducing adverb clauses to adverb phrases, and I was wondering why we cannot reduce "As I mentioned earlier..." to "As mentioning earlier...".
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1answer
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Trying to undertand if a noun an be an adverb given the struture of a sentence

I'm trying to teach my 7 year old daughter English and am clearly failing given I'm asking a question here. The following sentence has me a little baffled in regards to the noun, verb and adverb. ...
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Any comparative adverbs here?

I have much more inspiration, and the editing would be easier. Is "the editing" a gerund? If so, is "easier" being used as a comparative adjective?
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'We cheer each other on before I depart.' - What does 'on' mean?

Dear native English speaker. I'm not a native-speaker; sometimes prepositions (or adverbs) are tricky for non-native speakers. 'We cheer each other on before I depart.' https://www.youtube.com/watch?...
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Does “A but is B” mean that B is not A, or how to interpret “but is” in such a sentence (A and B can be any phrase)?

Chicago Manual of Style, paragraph 5.92 has a sentence that starts with the following: "For instance, pregnancy lasts nine months but is a nine‐month pregnancy, . . .", which is then followed by ...
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Is “not” a conjunction in “I want Joe, not him”?

I have been studying the word not lately and noticed it is not a conjunction just by itself and it is actually an adverb. Now, when we use following types of sentences, what is not's grammatical ...
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Does “not” modify main verb or adverb?

I was trying to understand why can't we say I have not money, and the answer was that have doesn't mean possession here, it is an auxiliary verb(AV) to make a perfect tense, which requires main verb --...
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What is the difference between “everything we studied before/earlier” and “everything we have studied before/earlier”?

Tell me please if there is any difference in meaning between the following sentences. In this class we are going to review everything we studied before. In this class we are going to review ...
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“Learn something fast” or “learn something quickly”?

Tell me please if the following sentences mean the same. If you want to learn a language fast, you have to immerse yourself into the language. If you want to learn a language quickly, you have ...
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Is it natural to say “pass exams well”?

Would a native English speake ever say or ask the following? I have passed my all exams well. Did you pass your exams well? What I mean by pass exams well is pass exams successfully.
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“I like swimming breaststroke” or “I like swimming the breaststroke”?

Tell me please if I need to use the before the types of swimming techniques when they are used as adverbs? For example: I like swimming (the) breaststroke. I prefer to swim (the) front crawl ...
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1answer
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The use of “stand” or “stand up” in context

Tell me plese if the use of up is optional in the following context. I have been standing (up) in line for three hours. In one of English textbooks they use up, but what does it add to the meaning?...
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“Since” vs “since then” at the end of a sentence

Related to this question: "Since" at the end of a sentence where it was stated that since can be used at the end of a sentence: There were the children to consider. She had told him she ...
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1answer
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Is “strongly” an acceptable adverb for the verb “transfer”?

Is it acceptable to say This determines how strongly heat is transferred from A to B. ? One of the definitions of "strongly" is to a great degree or extent So the answer to the question above ...
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Monthly or per month

Which word is correct in the following sentence They pay him handsome salary and he is earning fifteen thousand rupees monthly/per month. I think both are correct
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“Much” used as an adverb in an affirmative sentence?

For much: https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/150754/differences-between-very-and-very-much-as-adjective-modifiers An understanding of a sentence - much + adverb Is "very much" an ...
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1answer
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to have just made it up

Please, tell me the meaning of the "just". I looked up in dictionary, there are many definitions and I can't choose the proper meaning. The text is: To start the last section of this chapter, I ...
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Past continous adverb placement

In the phrase: The stock scandal was extremely damaging to his company's reputation. What is the verb tense? I think "was damaging" is past continuous and "extremely" is an adverb modifying "...
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3answers
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Using “now” with simple past tense

"Now" as an adverb of time is commonly used with present tense but can it also be used past tense? Additionally, is the usage of "now" in the following sentence grammatically correct? Why or why not? ...
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Can I use almost and job together?

My question, as I said in the title, is that can I use almost and job together? For example, is the sentence below correct (meaning and place of almost)? Unfortunately, there is almost no job ...
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1answer
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Is “ill-intendedly” a word?

When an adjective is used to describe an action, a verb, it becomes an adverb and is added a -ly. And so, these two sentences should be correct: It was an intended act. I intendedly did it. ...
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Usage of Anymore/Any more

Do these sentences use 'anymore/any more' correctly? We won't be trying any more of those products. We won't be trying those products anymore. Spotlight's on him now, he won't be trying anymore funny ...

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