Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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do the work anyway

a. You will have to do the work anyway. I think here 'anyway' means 'in any case', but could it also mean 'in any manner you can'? Is the sentence ambiguous?
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Twice more than

I read the reports twice more than you. I read twice more reports than you. I thought there are difference between two sentences. The first one means the number of the reports is twice more than the ...
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41 views

How can "How do you play tennis often?" be rephrased?

How can "How do you play tennis often?" be rephrased: "In what way do you often play tennis?" "How do you manage to play tennis (so) often?" "How come you play ...
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37 views

‘I gave three people an egg each.’

I want to ask about how focusing adverbs change meanings of nouns or noun phrases. First off, ‘approximately 99 degrees’ in ‘water boils at approximately 99 degrees’ means ‘100 degrees.’ Likewise, ...
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35 views

'Not yet' or 'Never yet'

What's the difference between usage of 'Not yet' and 'Never yet' in the following sentences.. I've not yet tasted it. I've never yet tasted it. And is the second sentence grammatically valid?
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‘We didn’t get ten points each.’

I got ten points, but you didn’t get ten points. In this case, can I use sentence ‘we didn’t get ten points each’? Or does it mean both of us didn’t get ten points?
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From (every / any / all) angles

Could anyone possibly let me know which collocation below sounds better in English? Apparently, you have decided to cooperate with them! Your manager don't seem to be a reliable person. Well, even ...
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Why is 'else' categorised as an adverb? [duplicate]

In multiple dictionaries (such as Cambridge, Merriam Webster, and Macmillan) the word 'else' can be categorised as an adverb. Why is this? I would've assumed that 'else' was a postpositive adjective, ...
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more than usually

Can one use (a) instead of (b)? a. He worked more rapidly than usually. b. He worked more rapidly than he usually does. I use (b). I am not sure (a) is correct.
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Is "the" an adverb or an adjective?

I read an article that states that the definite article "the" is an adjective before nouns the ball and is an adverb before superlative adjectives the best player What is its type (part ...
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24 views

"In a surprised way" or "In wonder" or

I ran for her and put my hand on her shoulder and called Sarah (my wife's name), but immediately, I found out that I had mistaken another woman for my wife! When the woman turned around I said: "...
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Alone among the animals on the farm he never laughed

I don't quite understand this sentence, especially the word order. The problem is that what part of the sentence does "alone" modify? Is it "he"? If I understand it right, can this ...
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Separately or individually, which can indicate one to one relationship?

The pair of cables are each connected to a different one of the pair of ports. I am trying to rewrite the sentence above I created into a simpler form by using an adverb . Which of the following can ...
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23 views

Can we use 'however, on the other side' in a sentence? [closed]

Can we use 'however, on the other side' in a sentence? Example Mobile phones are very useful. However, on the other side, it has many disadvantages. This is for formal essay writing. Please revert ...
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Can a present participle function adverbially?

She hit the ground running. He went flying. In these two examples, the present participles 'running' and 'flying' are clearly modifying their respective verbs. 'Running' complements 'hit', and '...
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1answer
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Is "where" in "place where" redundant?

Example sentence: We're heading to the place (where) you're going to have your next challenge. Is where redundant in situations like this? Why or why not?
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Using "Much" with a gerund

Much walking was necessary.​ "Much" as a determiner (quantifier) is used in negative sentences or questions, but it can be used in positive ones though it's formal or unnatural. However, in ...
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Subtle meaning difference in usage of adverb vs adjective in here

our current vague knowledge our currently vague knowledge As far as I know the two above phrases are grammatically correct. In the first one both adjectives "current" and "vague" ...
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1answer
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are sharply and steadily opposite?

Is this natural to say that something is changing sharply and steadily? Prices have been climbing sharply and steadily. In this sentence I want to say that prices increase sharply, not gradually. At ...
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"Apart from": exсlusion or inclusion?

Some people say that apart from means inclusion (example 1), and some say that it means exclusion (example 2). Apart from being a good husband, he is also a good father. It means he is a good husband ...
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His wishes still haven't come true

Can I use "still" before "haven't" or after "haven't" or at the end of the sentence? "His wishes still haven't come true." "His wishes haven't come true ...
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1answer
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In general, can we subsititute adverbs with 'on a ... basis' when used to modify *some* adjectives?

This question leaped to my mind after reading the definition of basis, especially in this sense: on a … basis the way things are organized or arranged; how often something happens (1). In relation ...
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I don't sometimes drink tea

Why don't native speakers use "sometimes" between verbs? "I don't sometimes drink tea."
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Where the adverb of manner could be placed in this sentence

I'm looking for information about the position of adverbs of manner in a sentence. I looked up several pages related to adverb placements here, here, here and here. As I understood, adverbs of manner ...
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"Before" as an adverb

I have a question regarding the use of "before" as an adverb. In the following examples, what word or words does "before" modify? As an adverb, it should modify either a verb, an ...
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Whether however or though

Wild monkeys are a problem for many areas in Japan. Every year they cause heavy damage to crops._______ the farmers are fighting back. In the above blank whether though or however should be used. I am ...
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What does 'else' modify?

I didn't know what else to say. He needed someone else. In these examples, what does 'else' modify? According to the Cambridge English Dictionary, it is an adverb, but I don't understand how. The ...
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What does "most" mean in "why do you most want to work here"?

Filling an interview form, I read the question Why do you most want to work here? What exactly does "most" mean? I read Where should "most" be in this sentence? and it seems to ...
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Are these phrases adverbs modifying the verb?

Are "in the air" and "at my home" adverbs modifying "was" or adjectives modifying "change" in the sentence below? Change was in the air at my home.
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Using two adverbs, both to give a degree to an adjective

I've read some of my possible duplicates: two-adverbs-in-a-row-with-ly, two-consecutive-adverbs-ending-in-ly, and is-it-the-formal-writing-to-use-double-adverbs-like-very-very-or-really-reall. My ...
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Adverb modifying adjective

There are too many good people to talk to. There are too many same cars as yours. I couldn’t understand what the difference between two structure. In the first sentence I can use “too many” before “...
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What can mean “over toward“ together?

I went up on the peak of the little mountain and ran my eye over the contiguous vicinity. Over toward Summit I expected to see the sturdy yeomanry of the village armed with scythes and pitchforks ...
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Adverb in active and passive voice

Extracts can be found in English on the website. You can find extracts in English on the website. When writing this passive sentence as active voice what “in English” describes the same? Would it be ...
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"A bit" and "a little" can only be used in front of an adjective when the adjective is being used after a verb such as be, but if a noun follows

Page 557 of Collins English Usage reads A bit and a little can only be used in front of an adjective when the adjective is being used after a verb such as be, but not with an adjective that is in ...
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'Enough' : adverb of degree modifying verbs

Unlike other adverbs of degree, enough can only modify adverbs and adjectives. (https://www.thefreedictionary.com/Adverbs-of-Degree.htm) Isn't enough used to modify verbs too?
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so vs. so much/manner or quantity

Can one use a. I enjoyed that movie so. instead of a1. I enjoyed that movie so much. ? Can one use b. I can't believe he danced so. instead of b1. I can't believe he danced so much. ? I think (b) is ...
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Abbreviating the thing one'll surely do

When someone says as an example: Ask me any questions you had. I want to respond like this: Will sure do. Or Sure will. I've seen these two structures but it feels more correct to use an adverb ...
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What is "more carefully than I do" in "My wife drives more carefully than I do", grammatically?

Consider this sentence: My wife drives more carefully than I do. I want to understand the grammatical role of the phrase, more carefully than I do Is it an adverb, and adverb phrase, an adverb ...
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Adverb form of novel? [closed]

It looks like 'novelistically' and 'novelly' are both correct. I'm sure there must be some subtleties in their usage. Can someone please suggest when to use which form?
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Thirsty vs thirstily

I wandered in the desert thirsty. I thirstily wandered in the desert. Which one is correct to describe “Being thirsty, I wandered in the desert.”?
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Is the prepositional phrase an adjective or adverb?

In the sentence, "Justice Department to announce lawsuit against Texas over law that bans nearly all abortions" are the prepositional phrases "against Texas" and "over law&...
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Inflections of the adverb 'well' (some senses are invariable)

Inflections of the adverb 'well' (Some senses are invariable) Better adv comparative ; best adv superlative https://www.wordreference.com/definition/well What does the dict. refer to by "Some ...
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rides a bike to work while all of his friends drive cars instead

Is "instead" used properly in the following? If not, please explain. Joe rides a bike to work while all of his friends drive cars instead.
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"neither" as adverb leading sentence

Is it an accepted form to begin a sentence with the word "neither" used as an adverb? Many grammar sources discuss sentences beginning with "neither", but only in the context of ...
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I don't understand this meaning of so

I was searching about the meaning of so but I didn't understand this meaning d: most certainly : INDEED you did so do it It's from maerriam webster. can you give me another examples? is it supposed to ...
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Do adverbs of degree with suffix -ly and others always work with adjectives before noun apart from a bit and a little?

My vocabulay book exercise says it's wrong to use a bit and a little with adjectives before a noun. For example, It's incorrect to say It was a bit small flat. (flat as a noun like an apartment). ...
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Sentences structure subject+verb+object+adjectives

I read this sentence: You'd boil the kettle dry. Shouldn't there be an adverb to describe the verb boil like dryly? Why has dry been used which is an adjective? Secondly following the same sentence ...
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Is it okay to say "We are no more in the 20th century"? Using "no more" with periods of time

The most correct form is "We are no longer in the 20th century". But saying "We are no more in the 20th century" or "We are in the 20th century no more" is also correct? ...
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‘after’ vs ‘later’

Do these sentences imply the same thing? “I’m going to Europe next week, and then America a week later.” “I’m going to Europe next week, and then America the week after.” Also, are they idiomatic?
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is this usage of “later” natural?

I’d like to know if it’s natural/grammatically correct to use “later” with the future tense. I’ll call you a week later.

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