Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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plays most beautifully

a. He plays the guitar, the drums and the piano, but he plays the piano most beautifully. b. He plays the guitar, the drums and the piano, but he plays the piano the most beautifully. c. Tom, Pete and ...
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What part of speech is “up” in the following sentences?

I walked up to the ATM. I looked up at the sky. The way I see it, "up" is an adverb in both sentences. Meanwhile, "to the ATM" and "at the sky" are prepositional ...
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Does “up” act as a preposition in the following sentences?

"Put up the banner." "Make up your mind." I get the impression that "up" functions as an adverb or phrasal verb in both.
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Use of “past” adverb [closed]

I am confused about the use of past as adverb, and the use of by as synonym of past. Help me to make it clear.
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What is “shut” in “close the door shut”?

I have heard the sentence "close the door shut" a lot. I know it means to close the door (?). However I am not sure about the function of "shut". Is it an adverb or an adjective ...
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is repulsively a correct word?

In the following sentence, does it make sense to use "repulsively" as an adverb? the most repulsively nationalistic sporting event. Generally, what is the best way to find out if an ...
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Grammatical functions of “both”

Consider the following sentences: My parents are both teachers. Sarah and Jane have both applied for the job. I looked up "both" within some dictionaries and non of them defines it as an ...
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Proper position of the adverb

I looked up the adverb “hardly” in a dictionary and there was a sentence as an example: “The play was so boring, I could hardly keep myself from falling asleep.” In the above sentence, “hardly” ...
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When I see you next

There is a sentence in a textbook: "I can answer any questions you've got when I see you next." What does "see you next" means? Is it a contraction of "see you next time"?...
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Habitual 'would' without any adverbs in the sentence

When I was a child I would attend English courses for children in my home town. My character used to be quite complicated so I refused many tasks I was offered there. Do these two sentences make ...
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Why is there used adverb?

I came across this sentence below: Judithe Hernandez’s art career began in Los Angeles during the socially and politically turbulent 1960s I know that adverb is mainly used to modify verb or ...
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“To follow his example, we will best be rewarded if we strive instead to listen always to the dictates of reason.”

I got this sentence of a book. To follow his example, we will best be rewarded if we strive instead to listen always to the dictates of reason. The position of the adverb "always" seems ...
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what comes before and after “namely”

I'd like to know whether there's any relation between what comes before and after "namely." Are the following sentences both correct? If not, why? John bought a wolf-like dog, namely, a ...
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does anyone help me with the grammar structure of “XXX is likely to cause deaths, both proportionally and in absolute numbers.”

I appreciate any help you can provide. Which part is "both proportionally and in absolute numbers" modifying? Naturally, it should be "to cause," but here "to cause" is ...
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Adverbs describing adverbs

My understanding of adverbs is right? The deer ran really quickly. Really describes the adverb quickly (quickly describes the verb ran hence is an adverb that's why I said so) hence really is an ...
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How can we say that 'adverbs are placed as close as possible to the words they are supposed to modify'

eg. He ate the cake quickly, In this sentence 'quickly' modifies 'ate' but they are not close to each other.
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Is “closed” an adverb or adjective in “pinch your nose closed”?

It is helpful to pinch your nose closed when you have to swallow something that tastes yucky, like cough syrup. In this sentence, how should I understand the word "closed" is it adverb or ...
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Surprisingly enough vs very surprisingly

I am not a native speaker of english language but I have noted that surprisingly enough is used more often than very surprisingly. What is the real difference between two? Enough and very both are ...
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2answers
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Omitting “there is”

(I'm aware of the can I omit there are question. Apart from the title, it doesn't look really similar to this one.) Consider an excerpt from a grammar cheat sheet. The "comments" (which are ...
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Often in negative sentences

Do both sentences mean the same? I am asking about BrE. "We don't often try to make this dish". 2."We try not to make this dish often"
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Participial adjectives & verb participles

Q) She is much liked by everybody. This is about the possibility of using degree adverb to participial adjectives and verb participles. In this sentence, is 'liked' used as a participial adjective? or ...
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Using adverb before or after a verb, what is the difference?

I have seen following two varients of the sentences John and team has worked tirelessly and John and team has tirelessly worked I believe tirelessly is an adverb. Which of the above sentences is ...
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Turn up, Turn down (direction) [closed]

Are there "turn up", "turn down" in addtion to "turn left" and "turn right" ?
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The phrase “from before”

In the sentence "I know him from before", what part of speech is "before"? Is such a sentence acceptable in the first place? More generally, is the phrase "from before" ...
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Frequency adverbs: Is this ordering correct?

I'm trying to ascertain whether the ordering of these frequency adverbs, in this link, is correct? Always 100% Usually 90% Often 70% Sometimes 50% Occasionally 30% Seldomly 10% Hardly ever 5% Never 0%...
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Manners of eating!

What is the adverb describing best a person who is eating food with no care how much he drops on the table, how badly he is taking eatables out of the dishes lying on the table, how much he leaves ...
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counted the cards carefully again [closed]

a) He counted the cards again carefully. b) He counted the cards again**,** carefully. c. He counted the cards carefully again. d. He counted the cards carefully**,** again. The question about each of ...
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In abundance or too often [closed]

If someone says 'Use flipflops in abundance.' What does it imply? What message does this sentence convey? Does this convey the number of flipflops or the frequency of using flipflops? Does it mean ...
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Can we use adverbs with comparative adjectives as in:

He is much taller than me. Vs He is incredibly taller than me. I know the first sentence is correct, but I was wondering if we could use Incredibly with a comparative adjective (taller).
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the position of “only” to emphasize the rareness

In the post meaning of "I have everything for my xxx" I said However, googling it only returns 3 hits. I was trying to emphasize the rareness of the searching results. Should I have put it ...
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behind or ahead?

The following is an extract from Frankenstein by Mary Shelley. I'm wondering whether the word "behind" is equal to "ahead" in 21st-century English in this context. Justine died; ...
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felt still more gloomily

The following extract is from Frankenstein. Does anyone know why the adverb gloomily is used after the linking verb felt? Yet, as I drew nearer home, grief and fear again overcame me. Night also ...
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Play your role the best

Is the following sentence correct In an imperfect world with not-so-perfect people and institutions, you have to play your role the best you can, take as many as you can along with you, with empathy ...
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Usage of rather

In the following two sentences which one is correct regarding the usage of rather Men are rather impressed by beauty then by character. Men are impressed rather by beauty then by character. I think ...
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What is the meaning of “no less” here? Is it positive or negative?

In other words, in the definition we have given of it, is it really possible to add to the boundary between the science of personality and the biological sciences a no less firmly established boundary,...
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What exactly does “walking around the house” mean?

I am confused of the word “around”. A person is outside and walking along the house? A person is inside the house walking in any direction. Does it mean number 1 or 2? If both are correct, how can ...
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Correct use of “most” as an adverb

The following sentence is part of the transcript of an speech of a non-native person: “Which is a technique that advertisement companies most use it.” I think “most” is used in a grammatically wrong ...
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Where to place all day long

In the following sentence where should I place the adverbs all day long The courtiers used to tell the king how efficient an administrator he was.
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Cowardly - Adjective or Adverb?

In the following sentence, is the word 'cowardly' an adjective or adverb? He acted in a cowardly manner. What I understand is the word cowardly is modifying the verb act. So it should be an adverb. ...
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Is the word “else” used correcly here?

You get approximately 5-6 questions in this task; for which it is advised that you spend 2 minutes per question. As there is no negative marking, choose the answer if you are confident else you can ...
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Where to place immediately [closed]

Which one of the following three sentences is correct It is time to immediately put the work in hand. It is time to put the work immediately in hand. It is time to put the work in hand immediately.
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“it's even been linked to” VS “it's linked to”

Sleeplessness may also cause inflammation, hallucinations, high blood pressure, and it's even been linked to diabetes and obesity. Sleeplessness may also cause inflammation, hallucinations, high blood ...
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Too much and very much

What is the difference between too much and very much. On seeing the lion she felt too much afraid. On seeing the lion she felt very much afraid. According to OALD meaning of too is very So are two ...
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Use of 'used to'

Can we use the adverb 'previously' in the structure 'used to'? Do we really need this adverb? The modal 'used to' already talks about things happened in past but not any longer they do. What about ...
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If adverb is removed the sentence still make sense

I think I found a very useful approach to find an adverb in a sentence by ignoring words one by one in a sentence. E.g., He is too shy. He is too (shy removed, doesn't make sense) He is shy. (Too ...
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What types of adverbs could be put between a phrasal verb?

From an ELL post ... (put adverb between the phrasal verb) is quite grammatical and such constructions are often used by native and fluent speakers. I strongly agree with this, as I've seen quite a ...
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“just gives one option” vs. “gives just one option”

There are two options A and B regarding to the usage of a word in the Merriam-Webster dictionary while the Cambridge Dictionary just gives one, that is A. To convey that idea, should I say the ...
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The position of the adverb “shockingly” changes the meaning

a. He shockingly used brilliant colors in these paintings. b. He used brilliant colors in these paintings shockingly. c. Brilliant colors were shockingly used. d. Brilliant colors were used shockingly....
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Are both of them correct? [closed]

a. Instead of running straight ahead, ~ b. Instead of straight running ahead, ~ Q1) Are both of them grammatically correct? Q2) If so, do they have the same meaning?
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interpretation of 'I stayed some days' — 'for some days straight' or 'on days for a total of some days'?

A stand-alone sentence, 'I stayed some days' --- if 'some' in this sentence were restricted to meaning 'an unspecified number of,' which would it mean I stayed on days for a total of an unspecified ...

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