Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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Adverbs: “tight” vs “tightly”

Tight is used as an adverb following verbs that denote a process of closure or constriction, as squeeze, shut, close, tie, and hold, denoting the state resulting from the process, whereas tightly ...
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“very much” modifying adjectives

Past participles that have become established as adjectives can, like most English adjectives, be modified by the adverb very. However, there is rarely any objection to the use of an intervening ...
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Is 'much funny' a correct English expression? If it's not, then how can we replace it?

There were sports for boys only, which was not much funny for girls. It's a sentence from a sixth grade English textbook. It stunned me a little bit. Can we use 'much funny'? Personally I'd say ...
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9answers
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Is “100% correct pronunciation” an understandable, correct, and proper English expression?

If I put "100% correct pronunciation" in the following sentence, is it understandable and correct? "100%" is what I would like to emphasize. If it is not right, how should it be ...
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if you want to do it

a. You can do the work properly if you want to do it. I think in (a) 'it' would be taken to mean 'the work'. But could 'it' also mean a1. You can do the work properly if you want. in other words You ...
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2answers
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Can an action verb have an adverb of degree?

Wondering why “very,” “so” or “too” are not used with a verb, I think an action verb cannot have an adverb of degree, but “it hurts too much” makes me think again. Can an action verb take an adverb of ...
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The before superlative adverbs

I have learnt that before "most" and "best" it's not wrong to omit the article. "Choose the dress you like (the) best/most." But before other adverbs do you always use it ...
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2answers
28 views

an adverb for a temporal completeness

Imagine there is a setting, in which people gather together to get some news or explanations on some current developments of some situation. Each time they gather, they get some new available ...
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0answers
32 views

What parts of speech are “together” and “at the park”?

What parts of speech do you think 'together' and 'at the park' are and what do they describe in this sentence: Nobody saw Anna and John together at the park. I'm thinking 'together' is a adverb, and ...
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1answer
15 views

Shortly or instantly?

I want to know which one of those words is more suitable to use when I get something without waiting? For example: We will receive the result ____, no waiting! My first guess is instantly, but I don'...
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2answers
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“[They] went away disappointed/disappointedly” – Does “went away disappointedly” make sense?

Most of the people waiting for tickets went away ________. A. disappointed B. disappointedly As far as I know, if I choose A, the meaning would be 'Most of the people waiting for tickets went away, ...
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1answer
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What's the meaning of the word 'just' in this phrase: “There's never a point where you just gonna know everything.”?

Sometimes I get confused about the usage of "just" and the meaning of that word. For example, in this phrase: There's never a point where you just gonna know everything. What's the meaning ...
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1answer
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Verb+adjective into adverb+adjective

Can verb+adjective complement be freely inverted into adverb+adjective? For example: Something seems beautiful. It’s something seemingly beautiful. Something looks special. It’s something visually ...
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1answer
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Can I use two “half” for emphasis?

Instead of “half of an apple is eaten” or “an apple is half eaten,” can I say, “half of an apple is half eaten”?
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1answer
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There is not even a single thing

There is not even a single thing in the shop. The article a and single means one. Can we use these two together? Is the sentence is correct if we remove the article a or the word single? (ie, There ...
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1answer
64 views

The white car is ____ more expensive than the green

The white car is _________ more expensive than the green (Options: very, pretty, fairly, slightly). The answer given is slightly. Could you explain why this option is given as the correct one and ...
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1answer
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not different from

If two things are quite similar, you can say that one thing is not very/much different from the other. If two things are alike, you can say that one thing is no different from the other. Don't say ...
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2answers
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THEN: since that is so; therefore

in that case; in those circumstances: If you want to quit, then do so. If you're sick, then you should stay in bed. If traffic is heavy, then allow extra time. since that is so; therefore: If the car ...
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1answer
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“Some day/time” if “some” modifies and specifies a more particular day/time

The adverbs someday and sometime express future time indefinitely: Let's meet sometime when your schedule permits. The two-word forms are always used when some is an adjective modifying and specifying ...
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1answer
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“probably” placement

Please help me with placing of "probably" in negative sentences. My workbook says that 'probably' comes before helping verb. For example, Anna probably won't be in class tomorrow or Anna ...
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Sentence adverbs and the user's attitude

According to Disjunct_(linguistics) [S]entence adverbs convey the mood, attitude or sentiments of the speaker. Yet, Sentence adverbs form a completely standard aspect of English grammar, but there ...
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1answer
27 views

He's very good with children and no slouch around the house either/too

He's very good with children and no slouch around the house either/too Which option either or too is grammatically correct here?
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1answer
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Question about using 'how many days' in interrogative sentences

As far as I observed people would use when instead, but still, I wonder if the sentences below are grammatically correct. How many days later will you come (back)? After how many days will you be ...
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1answer
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“Each” (adverb): from each one

Each (adverb): to, from, or for each (one). https://www.wordreference.com/definition/Each However, I cannot come up with any example using the meaning "from". Is such a meaning grammatical? ...
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1answer
35 views

Can “nights” be an adverb?

Is "nights" an adverb in the second line of these song lyrics? I used to be a lunatic from the gracious days I used to feel woebegone and so restless nights My aching heart would bleed for ...
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1answer
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go along to … vs. go to

Is there any difference if "along" in the following is omitted? What function does it serve? I might go along to the meeting tonight.
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which adverb modifies which adverb?

There are two sentences: It is not necessarily good. (I think it means: it may be bad) and It is necessarily not good. (I think it means: it must be bad) I think not modifies necessarily in ...
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1answer
10 views

order of adverbs and their effect on the meaning of sentece

Which order of adverbs is correct? but currently our educational programme just overloads but our educational programme currently just overloads I think the second one is a little bit awkward. If ...
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1answer
32 views

Should we use “before” or “earlier” at the end of a past perfect sentence?

Should we use "before" or "earlier" at the end of a past perfect sentence? Example 1: When I was 20, I decided to try what I had never tried before/earlier. Example 2: At 20, I ...
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1answer
29 views

As good as That/they/them ? are

Opportunities as good as that are ____ a. scarce, b. peculiar, c. weird, d. unconventional I don't understand why "that" is used in this sentence. If I were to create such a sentence I ...
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1answer
27 views

Which preposition should be used in this case?

A person is holding sand in his hand and it starts to fall from it. Is the sand: leaking through his hand? leaking from his hand? Which would be correct? If none, which preposition should be used ...
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1answer
65 views

Explanations for in the next three weeks, in the coming three weeks, and in the following three weeks

I always find phrases like in the next three weeks, in the coming three weeks, or in the following three weeks confusing. I think there are two explanations for this kind of phrase. Are explanations (...
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2answers
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position of adverb

I watched the movie Dr. Dolittle. A character dragonfly which was burnt by a dragon's sniff in a cave said this: I will meet whosoever survives outside. To me it is fine because it is: Subject+ verb+...
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Otherwise or If otherwise

Which is more appropriate for the "if not" in the following sentence? When a teacher hands out a novel today, the first question in every student’s mind is “Is there a movie of this?” If ...
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1answer
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It will be correctly identified vs It will correctly be identified

I have two sentences 'It will correctly be identified as X.' and 'It will be correctly identified as X.' I was wondering is one of them incorrect grammatically perhaps? or do they both mean the same ...
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what does “up at the front sat” mean? and is “up” as an adverb?

They sat in the high seats at the back of the bus, and Poppy sank into her book. Up at the front sat a European woman in her forties, dressed in a satin suit and high-heeled shoes as if for an outing. ...
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1answer
35 views

as little sensitive as possible

a. I gave them as little sensitive information as possible. Can't that sentence be read in two ways? I think little could be modifying sensitive or information, so I see two possible readings: The ...
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1answer
29 views

Discourse analysis about adverbs like “maybe” and “perhaps”

This is a weird question I came across. It's about adverbs indicating possibility such as "maybe" and "perhaps." When we use this type of adverb, the sentence becomes hypothetical? ...
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1answer
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what tense to use with 'until'

What verb tense to use with the adverbial clause 'until'? for example I had been swimming until nine o'clock yesterday I swam until nine o'clock yesterday I was swimming until nine o'clock yesterday ...
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Using “in between” as an adverb

Can we use “in between” when talking about something between two things when those two things are not specified? Example: Let’s say I am watching this video with a friend of mine. Can I say, “The cat ...
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2answers
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Can adverb be used after “so” instead of adjective?

Compare these sentences: The driver in front shouldn't have stopped so sudden. The driver in front shouldn't have stopped so suddenly. The second sentence was taken from my book, but that was the ...
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3answers
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“So” or “then” in the conditional mood

If she is going to London, then I will also go along with her. If she is going to London, so I will also go along with her. I think the second one is incorrect. I was taught that we can’t use ‘so’ ...
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1answer
31 views

What should we talk about America as for?

If I hear someone say "As for the economy, we should talk about America", can I ask "What should we talk about America as for?" ? I'm curious if we can ask these sorts of questions....
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Ambiguity in adverb, verb order

Which one is correct? the evidence can be used to falsely incriminate someone. the evidence can falsely be used to incriminate someone.
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2answers
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‘I tickled his foot excitedly’ [closed]

Can ‘I tickled his foot excitedly’ mean I tickled his foot so I made him excited? I want to use ‘interestedly’ instead of ‘interestingly.’
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Can the reverted main clause be ignored when using “Only If” in the front?

Original sentence: The picnic will be canceled only if it rains. Using Only if in the front: Only if it rains will the picnic be canceled. My book also gives other examples: Only when the teacher ...
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1answer
33 views

Why is the adverb “often” treated differently?

In many dictionaries, such as Merriam-Webster, the adverb "often" is defined as follows: often (adverb): many times However, this adverb can be used in some ways different from the other ...
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2answers
33 views

What does “On what subject did you conduct studies?” exactly ask about?

I know that a question can directly be related to a verb. However, can it refer to a noun rather than the verb? For example; On what subject did you conduct studies? I think that this question can ...
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1answer
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What did you give him money in exchange for?

I would like to learn if these kinds of questions are possible and correct in English. I think they are but I'm not sure. What did you give him the money in exchange for? In exchange for what did ...
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2answers
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“He wants everyone back” - Is the word back an adverb

He wants everyone back. Is "back" an adverb? It doesn't modify the verb so has thrown me off a little.

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