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3
votes
2answers
18 views

Adjective or adverb before another adjective

I am aware that adjectives only modify nouns, while adverbs modify everything else (verbs, adjectives and other adverbs). However I'm experiencing some difficulty identifying these two expressions ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Tomorrow used as an adjective

Is the following sentence correct? He has given me a lot of documents to read before the presentation tomorrow. I think it should be He has given me a lot of ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

Adverb instead of adjective

I read the sentence “Last Christmas I was poorly” and don’t understand why an adverb is used to describe a person instead of the adjective “poor”. Is it an exception?
0
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there any difference in meaning between “how” and “what” when each is used to start a subordinate clause?

Is there any difference between how and what in the following sentence? Anny was just telling Wendy how she liked to eat the ice cream at the shop. Anny was just telling Wendy what she liked to eat ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

The difference between hard / hardly

I had a discussion with a colleague at work. I was not able to explain why the things are the way they are. I explained him the meanings and so on, with the reason "because". Topped with "take it or ...
1
vote
1answer
12 views

Whether to use direct or directly

I have learned that direct is both adjective and adverb. Then why we use directly in sentences. One of those sentences is- The sun shone directly in my eyes. You will report directly to the ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

I am feeling well, though not feeling well but feeling good

I was thinking about sentences like: It sounds good It sounds well I didn't see a difference and couldn't understand why "good" was used more often than "well" and I found some interesting example.....
0
votes
1answer
44 views

“This extreme…” or “This extremely…”?

I know that this question can be applied to other words in their adjective and adverb forms. But as I came across "extreme", I'm specifying my question about it. I have found them both possible ...
1
vote
1answer
15 views

Adjective form of “over the years”

Adverbs to. Adjectives quickly to quick , well to good My problem is: He has earned the money over the years. Can I say: The money is his over-the-years earning? Thank you....
0
votes
2answers
41 views

Adverbs before adjectives

Generally speaking, adverbs modify verbs, and adjectives modify nouns. However, I guess adverbs can modify nouns as well. With that said, I recently came across the following sentence that just struck ...
0
votes
4answers
33 views

The way to use ''less'' in senteces

My mom told me to add one spoonful of sugar less than amount in recipe into cake batter. The word ''less'' always confuses me. Is the way "less" is used in the sentence correct? If so, is it an ...
3
votes
2answers
34 views

What is the difference between “The longest” and “Longest”

hello guys i came across a question that is: Mammoth Cave in Kentuck,Whic is ...... cave in the world,has 345 miles of subterranean passageways. i reduced the answers to the longest and longest.But ...
2
votes
2answers
75 views

In “The population of Pakistan is less than that of China.” what is less?

What is LESS in this sentence? The population of Pakistan is "less" than that of China. a) adjective b) noun c) pronoun d) adverb Why is less adverb here? Is he using population as a verb? ...
0
votes
0answers
43 views

After linking verb whether adjectives or adverbs

I know after linking verb, Adjectives should be used, not adverbs. For example I'am fine (not well, as WELL is an adverb). But how you explain the following sentences , I'm abroad. I'm home. I'm ...
0
votes
1answer
11 views

“Here” Adverb or adjective

I'm here. I have been here In this two sentences, I'm confused "here" is whether adjective or adverb. As I know linking verbs follow adjective not adverb, it (here) would be adjective,isn't it?
0
votes
2answers
24 views

Adjective preposition phrase vs adverb preposition phrase

I'm good Chicago is on the northest tip of Illinois. I'm confuse, in first sentence, "Good" as an adjective, modify subject "I", or linking verb 'IS". If "Good" modify subject "I", then what the ...
0
votes
1answer
32 views

Is asleep in “to fall asleep” an adverb?

As you can see, DK school dictionary says "asleep" in to fall asleep is an adverb. Yet, according to https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/asleep "Asleep" in to fall asleep is an ...
3
votes
2answers
40 views

Usage of 'as' before Adjectives:

In the following sentence, should I put 'as' before the adjective 'offensive'? I hope you won't take my criticism as offensive. I hope you won't take my criticism offensive. I feel as if the two ...
1
vote
2answers
165 views

Why isn’t “reasonable” used in “The landlords raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and REASONABLY so”?

Could somebody explain me why we use reasonably instead of reasonable: The landlords raised the monthly rent for the first time in several years, and reasonably so. Quite confuse this grammar.
2
votes
1answer
23 views

He arrived “breathless” at the top of the stairs

I came across this sentence when I looked up the word breathless in OALD: He arrived breathless at the top of the stairs. Why don’t they use breathlessly? I’ve learnt that there are some verbs ...
0
votes
1answer
83 views

Usage of ''as'' before adjective

Can I use "as" to make adjective into adverb like examples below: 1) I always think as different from other people. 2) I always think differently from other people. Are both sentences have same ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

“so” or “such” to replace a preceding adjective

I'd like to know whether "so" or "such" is correct in the following: Those actors were not hired because they all looked indistinct or were regarded as such. Those actors were not hired ...
2
votes
1answer
447 views

Is LESS is a Adjective or Adverb in the particular context

You are paying less attention to your studies than you used to do. What is “less” in this sentence? A. Noun B. Verb C. Adverb D. Adjective I was studying English mcqs at a particular website which ...
0
votes
1answer
118 views

Which part of speech is “left” in this sentence?

I've always thought (perhaps, erroneously) that if there is some ambiguity in determining whether the given word is an adjective or a past participle, you need to look at whether the "source" of ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

Is there difference in meaning between these three sentences?

Is there difference in meaning between these three sentences? He was working less hard than it's usual. He was working less hard than usual. He was working less hard than usually.
1
vote
1answer
322 views

Should it be “carefully” instead of “careful” in this sentence?

He paused outside the doors, taking stock of his men, careful not to give any sign of his thoughts. (source) My understanding is the phrase "careful not to give any sign of his thoughts" is an ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

“taste different” or “taste differently”? [duplicate]

Tell me please if it correct different or differently in the following sentence. But eggs can taste different/differently depending on how fresh they are, the way they're cooked and the diet of the ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

actual and actually

Is there any practical difference between the following sentences? a. That's the actual reason I'm going. b. That's the reason I'm actually going. I'd appreciate your help.
3
votes
1answer
3k views

How frequent or how frequently?

What would be the correct grammar? Should I use adverb after how? How frequent you do this? or How frequently you do this?
1
vote
1answer
142 views

Confusion of comparative adjective and/or adverb in a sentence

An adjective is that which tells something about a noun or a pronoun. And an adverb is that which describes a verb. However, I find sentences where an adjective is used to describe a verb as follows: ...
1
vote
1answer
69 views

In “You will end up alone”, is “alone” an adjective or an adverb?

In "You will end up alone", is "alone" an adjective or an adverb? I mean, one can say that "alone" modifies the verb "end up" and, therefore, it is an adverb. However, this phrase can also be ...
1
vote
1answer
49 views

I don't know what 'straight' functions as, in “set someone straight”

Don't worry, I set him straight on this matter. I'd like to know what 'straight' functions as. Does it function as being an adverb, or an adjective? I don't know which is well fit to interpret the ...
2
votes
2answers
60 views

Can the adverb “exclusively” in the sentence be replaced with an adjective without changing the meaning of the sentence?

I came across this sentence in an online article. Some medical literature has found that exclusively breastfeeding during the first four to six months of life may decrease your baby’s risk of ...
0
votes
3answers
91 views

How extremely are you afraid of snakes?

I saw some questions just as this and would like to ask you whether this question is possible and grammatically correct in English? I am extremely afraid of snakes. How extremely are you ...
0
votes
1answer
56 views

The usage of murkiness

I would like to know if the word "murkiness" in the sentence below is syntactically correct. then nothing will remain from him except as a worm creeps in murkiness. His life begins and ends with ...
2
votes
1answer
40 views

What does “a good” mean? [duplicate]

I have seen the following sentence on a news web site, which was telling about a volcano eruption. A sentence including "a good" surprised me, as I have not seen it used like this. Here is the ...
1
vote
1answer
1k views

Is it “say different” or “say differently”?

I see examples of both on the web. Think You Don't Need Houseplants? Science Says Different (Forbes) You say he's just a friend, but your voice says differently (ScienceDaily) Life is ...
2
votes
3answers
684 views

“A slow moving” vs. “A slowly moving”

which of the following sentences is even more correct? There is a slow moving vehicle ahead. Or there is a slowly moving vehicle ahead. What is the difference between them. To ...
2
votes
2answers
545 views

The methods are considered most general/generally

sentence in question: The methods that are suggested by Paul and Gerald are considered most general. In the sentence, I think that "most general" is very odd. Then, I adjusted it to "most ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

What part of speech is “difficult”

It is exceedingly difficult to ascertain precisely what is meant by the word 'culture'. That is a sentence from exercise for English learners where they are asked to determine the part of speech of ...
0
votes
1answer
52 views

How to distinguish between adjective and adverb used as to-infinitive?

For example, Both managers and staff benefit from the workshops designed by a psychological institute to improve relationships within the workplace. Sync Online has delivered copies of ...
-1
votes
1answer
1k views

Is it grammatically correct to say 'absolutely incredible' and is it a common expression? [closed]

I've always found it natural for me to describe an experience or moment as 'absolutely incredible'. I don't think this expression is very common because I haven't heard anyone say it yet!
0
votes
2answers
661 views

“Did I hear that correctly?” or “Did I hear that correct?” Which one is correct?

This is a conversation in the film "A Wish for Christmas", you can download its subtitle on the internet The boss is talking on the phone: Boss: Frankly, the way things are going, Christmas is ...
0
votes
1answer
30 views

Confused “Complements and adjuncts” in these sentences “Did I hear this correct?” & “Am I reading this right?”

Source Complements and adjuncts are different. A complement is necessary in order to complete the meaning. An adjunct is not necessary, and adds extra information. Compare He put the cake ...
2
votes
1answer
302 views

The difference between “common” and “commonly”

The adjective "common" has the meaning of "shared by". Does the adverb "commonly" have such a meaning? For example, does the sentence below I created make sense? I am trying to describe that each ...
1
vote
1answer
5k views

Where should I put “indeed” in this sentence?

I could definitely tell that his desire for reading was indeed insane. I could definitely tell that his desire for reading was insane indeed. I've already saw this one, and I've also googled it ...
0
votes
1answer
24 views

She said that, over time, they lose their ability to “full charge”, or “ fully charge”?

She said that, over time, they lose their ability to full charge. why is the above sentence wrong? FULL is adjective, FULLY is adverb, CHARGE is noun. Isn't it adjective +noun, and adverb+verb(or ...
0
votes
2answers
14k views

why “too good” is wrong?

I have an example "I love it here in NY. It's too good." I know that it should be "very good" or "so good" but I don't know why "too good" is wrong.
0
votes
2answers
418 views

“He was much delighted to receive the news”

Is it correct to use "much" with "delighted"? It sounds alright to me, just want to confirm.
0
votes
1answer
80 views

Confusion about structure of a sentence- “I personally wish to be away from this kind of discussions with team.”

I personally wish to be away from this kind of discussions with team. Is the above statement grammatically correct? or should I say My personal wish to be away ... or it should be structured ...