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votes
1answer
15 views

Can the word “More” be used in this context

We usually say: How far is London? But suppose if I am along the way to London, and very tired. Can I say: How more far is London? I am not a native speaker. Thank you.
1
vote
2answers
11 views

Are con­junc­tions like “and” al­lowed be­fore a tran­si­tion word?

In this sen­tence, is it gram­mat­i­cally cor­rect to use and be­fore con­se­quently? He did not sub­mit the ap­pli­ca­tion by the dead­line and con­se­quently, his ap­pli­ca­tion was not con­sid­...
2
votes
1answer
921 views

“Not … nor” possible?

I am looking for a band name. I am German, so I am not quite sure if not [Adjective] nor [Adjective] is grammatically correct. Is not yellow nor pink or not famous nor envied a possible phrase, or ...
1
vote
1answer
124 views

“likely to” vs “likely”

This sentence is from a TOEFL material: According to the news report, this investment by the company will likely provide a major boost to the economy because it will lead to the development of new ...
2
votes
2answers
552 views

The methods are considered most general/generally

sentence in question: The methods that are suggested by Paul and Gerald are considered most general. In the sentence, I think that "most general" is very odd. Then, I adjusted it to "most ...
3
votes
2answers
343 views

“Plenty” with “much/easy/long/etc.”

I'm sure I'm on the right track of understanding how the adverb "plenty" works with other words but from example such as "She had plenty more work to do" I'm assuming we can use "plenty" with pretty ...
2
votes
1answer
4k views

Is it correct to end a sentence with “still”?

I've seen still used at the end of a sentence a lot of times. For example "I love you, still" "I would recommend you to do that, still" Etc. Is it correct to use still this way?
3
votes
1answer
236 views

Use of the verb “extract” with the adverb “as”

Can I use the verb "extract" with the adverb "as"? My example would be the following sentence: A reference type is extracted as an EClassifier. Is this sentence correct? The context is that I ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

From behind - preposition or adverb?

Please have a look at the sentence below: A car came up FROM BEHIND and overtook me. I have done some research and came to the conclusion (whether correct or not) that 'behind' in this sentence is ...
0
votes
2answers
3k views

“Not enough memory” vs. “no enough memory”

Which is correct? Why? Not enough memory No enough memory The first variant seems to be significantly more popular on the Internet than the second one. I want to use such construction as an error ...
2
votes
2answers
280 views

The use of DO as adverb of quality

I found this sentence in a blog: I didn't do tell him anything In the sentence above, I see that do is the adverb. Is it gramatically correct to write like that where /didn't/, /do/ and the verb /...
6
votes
2answers
400 views

Absent any verb, when can you use an adverb?

dualism = {mass noun} 1. The division of something conceptually into two opposed or contrasted aspects, or the state of being so divided I know that definitions don't have to be written as complete ...
2
votes
2answers
2k views

How can 'important', an adjective, modify an entire clause? Why not an adverb?

[Source:] "More important" and "more importantly" are used as full-sentence modifiers, often in the initial position and treated parenthetically (set off with a comma). Either phrase can usually be ...
2
votes
3answers
746 views

Why are these adverbs sentential, and not regular, adverbs?

Source: Starting a Sentence With "Hopefully", By Mignon Fogarty, 2007 Sep 21 ... the traditional use of hopefully... is to mean “in a hopeful manner,” as in 1. Squiggly looked hopefully ...
3
votes
3answers
247 views

Does 'sic' behave as any other English adverb?

This question is motivated by my attempt to complement [sic] with some text to clarify the original errors. I wanted to elucidate that the original website erroneously displayed two quotation marks ...
7
votes
8answers
923 views

Why are both “when” and “once” used in “… when it was once broken”?

Transporting the stone when it was once broken was comparatively simple. This sentence is by the English author George Orwell from the world-famous book Animal Farm. I am wondering the reason why the ...
1
vote
1answer
71 views

Is it allowed to place a capital letter after adverb?

In sentences like: Also, it provides ... Also, It provides ... is it allowed to place It(Capital I) instead of it after adverb Also?
1
vote
1answer
377 views

Relative adverbs: when vs where

Source: p 39, The Law of Contract, 5 ed (2012), by O’Sullivan and Hilliard 2.83. ... We have seen that the general rule is that displaying goods in shops only constitutes an invitation to treat, ...
1
vote
2answers
182 views

the usages of while

Metals occupy a rather special position in the study of solids, (while) sharing a variety of striking physical properties that other solids such as sulfur lack. One of my friends has told me the ...
2
votes
1answer
122 views

number unite adjective

Please give me a two hour leave Please give me two hours leave Providing that those are correct, Could you tell me when/ in which situation you would rather use one over the other? Meanwhile, would ...
6
votes
2answers
2k views

Is “You gonna slice them up real nice” right?

From Friends(S02E14): You gonna slice them up real nice? (referring to cut up tomatoes) Is it grammatically right to use the word nice? Should it be an adverb? Such as: You gonna slice them up ...
1
vote
1answer
13k views

Word order: “10 minutes more” or “10 more minutes”?

I'm still packing my clothes. I'll need 10 minutes more. I'm still packing my clothes. I'll need 10 more minutes. Are both grammatically correct?
1
vote
0answers
21 views

Which fits better “more important” or “more importantly”? [duplicate]

Sorry - I always think the question is obvious when plainly it is not. Should I use "important" or "importantly" in the introductory phase of this sentence: "Appellant's argument is premature. ...
3
votes
1answer
19k views

“Wrote it wrong” or “wrote it wrongly”?

Which is grammatically correct? He wrote it wrong. He wrote it wrongly.
3
votes
2answers
3k views

“I'm not able to make it fly high”

I'm not able to make it fly high. If I change not able to unable, will it retain the same meaning? When should I use not able and when unable? Is the phrase fly high correct? Suppose I'm trying to ...