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votes
1answer
71 views

Why, speaking of a colonoscopy, does it say “they put it up your bottom” and not “they put it up through your bottom”?

This is a piece of dialogue about a colonoscopy from the series "Outnumbered" s03e03: — Yes, but how does it get inside your insides? — Well, they put it up your bottom. Why not "they put it ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

(Run him over / Run over him) Which is correct?

He was run over by a truck. So, in this case which is correct? a. A truck ran him over. b. A truck ran over him. I think 'over' in 'a' sentence is adverb and 'over' in 'b' sentence is ...
0
votes
1answer
15 views

using “to” with modified “home”

My grammar reference book says that I can't use preposition "to" with adverb "home": I'm tired. Let's go home now. not I'm tired. Let's go to home now. But what if I want to specify whose home ...
0
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1answer
28 views

About the use of “whenever” in the headline “Why Working Till Whenever Is a Risky Retirement Strategy”

Does whenever in the construction: Why Working Till Whenever Is a Risky Retirement Strategy play the role of an adverb? And more generally is it grammatical to follow up a preposition with an ...
0
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1answer
21 views

Choose correct sentence

He reached the village just when the sun was setting. When just the sun was setting he reached the village. When the sun was setting he just reached the village. He just reached the village when ...
0
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1answer
23 views

Use of “past” in sentence

Would you be okay drinking milk that is few days past its expiration date? I couldn’t understand how the past is used in this sentence . Is it adverb or preposition?
0
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1answer
29 views

Use of “in” to show form of something

Use of “in” to show form of something confuses me. I mean can it be used in every structure while identifying form of something. Would the sentence below be correct ? New fish oils will be in pill ....
0
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2answers
18 views

Adverb vs preposition

He is going up the mountain road. He is going up along the mountain road. In 1, up is working as a preposition, while along is the preposition in the 2. Do the both carry same meaning? Thank you.
2
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2answers
43 views

Which is the proper use of the adverb “equally”?

Because it matters to me as it does to you equally. -In this sentence I've placed the adverb at the end of the sentence even though I'd prefer to reform the sentence, for emphasis purposes, into: ...
0
votes
1answer
27 views

using verb with a specified time

I have a sentence: "I will be dead by soon" And there is my question. Can I use some action adding an adverb with "by" like that. I know that "I will be dead by noon" will do, but what about this ...
3
votes
2answers
41 views

Usage of 'as' before Adjectives:

In the following sentence, should I put 'as' before the adjective 'offensive'? I hope you won't take my criticism as offensive. I hope you won't take my criticism offensive. I feel as if the two ...
1
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3answers
48 views

Stripped off half its gear/stripped half of its gear

Let's say you are selling a game character online equipped with 10 pieces of gear. You posted it trying to sell it online. And then a potential buyer messaged you saying: (after checking if the ...
0
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0answers
37 views

“Off” VS. “Off something”

1) Spend a hundred dollars and get 10% off 2) Approximately, on Black Friday you get 25% off any item you buy. As I know, that most prepositions have dual functions: as a preposition if it is ...
2
votes
1answer
765 views

Is LESS is a Adjective or Adverb in the particular context

You are paying less attention to your studies than you used to do. What is “less” in this sentence? A. Noun B. Verb C. Adverb D. Adjective I was studying English mcqs at a particular website which ...
2
votes
1answer
24 views

In the way or the way

“Eat the Greek way” vs. “Eat in the Greek way” Are these sentences both correct? Have they the same meaning? Is there a difference in the grammar structure? Is there a rule that explains when to ...
0
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2answers
28 views

Is a preposition + an adverb a possible pattern in the English language?

Is a preposition + an adverb a possible pattern in the English language? An example sentence I know you from somewhere.
0
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1answer
28 views

The position of the conjunctions and adverbials

I have some location problems with sentences that have more than one prepositional phrase or conjunction. Examples, I decided to come there yesterday. What does it mean? I decided it yesterday or I ...
2
votes
1answer
170 views

The problem is anything but easy

I am confused about the function of the word "but" in given sentence what "part of speech" the word "but" is in the given sentence. I actually shared my opinions with my teacher about the word "but". ...
1
vote
1answer
143 views

“likely to” vs “likely”

This sentence is from a TOEFL material: According to the news report, this investment by the company will likely provide a major boost to the economy because it will lead to the development of new ...
3
votes
2answers
129 views

'Pass something on (to somebody)' - what does 'on' mean?

I'm not a native-speaker; sometimes prepositions (or adverbs) are tricky for non-native speakers. "Pass the book on to me when you've finished with it." In this sentence, I don't know what does 'on' ...
0
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0answers
7 views

how to express adverbials by using preposition“with”

how can we express "she was going home and at the same time she was crying" she was going home with crying or she was going home by crying. could you please help me?
1
vote
1answer
53 views

What is the as in the sentence called, preposition or adverb clause?

But yogurt tasted with that spoon was also rated as less sweet than when eaten with heavier or larger spoons. I have been always wondering what this kind of as is called grammatically, e.g. adverb, ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“For at least” vs. “at least for” ?

What do you prefer, or which one is more acceptable; putting the adverbs or phrases before the preposition, or after. He has been jailed at least/nearly for 5 years. He has been jailed for at ...
1
vote
1answer
23 views

Should I use preposition or not

"He held the post () ten years." I saw this line somewhere.It was written there that ten years is acting as adverb.But it seems stilted to me.I think for must be used in place of bracket. Am I right,...
0
votes
1answer
795 views

Does an adverb go before or after a prepositional phrase?

For example: He spoke optimistically to the people. vs. He spoke to the people optimistically. vs. He optimistically spoke to the people. vs. Optimistically, he spoke to the people.
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3answers
123 views

Is “as” a preposition or an adverb?

"We can even shut out everything external to us, and concentrate on an internal dialogue, as when we are lost in thought." Is "as" a preposition or an adverb? Thanks.
1
vote
1answer
26 views

Though to select an option

I have read this ELL question and this ELL question but isn't clear to me how the "though" word is used in this sentence. Is it used to show selection? (I say the blue one) or other meaning is applied?...
0
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1answer
120 views

Be home vs be at home [duplicate]

What is the difference? He is not home. He is not at home. Can I use these two phrases interchangeably?
0
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0answers
886 views

An “s” at the end of “toward”, “inward”, “forward”, “backward”, “outward”, “upward”, “downward”

I hunger to know whether it's true that an "s" at the end of such adverb as "inward", "forward", "backward", "outward", "upward", "downward", and "toward" (as a preposition only) is a choice of ...
0
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0answers
638 views

Usage of “down” as a preposition and adverb

What does down mean in these statements? As a preposition: She was walking down the street. As an adverb: to go down to Miami/Florida.
0
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2answers
279 views

To praise: how to build a phrase using this word

Would your native speakers' ears feel uncomfortable and confused if I said: "to praise in beautiful words" instead of "to priase using beautiful words"
3
votes
1answer
362 views

“Inside of” in AmE

What is inside of the head? The foreigner is probably hiding inside of the city. 'Inside of' is used as an adverb/preposition in these two sentences. In BrE it would sound as "inside the head/...
0
votes
1answer
2k views

From behind - preposition or adverb?

Please have a look at the sentence below: A car came up FROM BEHIND and overtook me. I have done some research and came to the conclusion (whether correct or not) that 'behind' in this sentence is ...
1
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3answers
1k views

Is the word “there” an adjective in this sentence

CONTEXT: I can't find my ring. Oh, there it is. Is the word "there" an adjective in the sentence above? or is it a pronoun? For me it looks like the word "it" is the pronoun, but I'm not ...
0
votes
1answer
1k views

On around 23-25 December

Is it correct to say "on around" for a date? Is it even grammatical correct? on is as preposition and around acts as adverb it will be on around 23-25 December Can we put adverb after ...
3
votes
1answer
334 views

Is it correct to say “The prices settle down/up $2 at $100”?

The prices settle down $2 at $100. or The prices settle up $2 at $100. Are these two words down and up both adverbs or prepositions? What is the meaning of settle here? I guess the meaning of ...
0
votes
1answer
578 views

“Inside” in the role of an adverb or a noun?

Consider the sentences below: wipe the inside of the fridge. wipe inside the fridge. In the first sentence, inside is a noun but in the second one, is an adverb. Now,what is the ...
4
votes
1answer
471 views

A question about preposition

In the following sentence " I meet him on friday" , we use preposition 'on' before 'friday' , but in the following sentence "I met him last friday" we dont use preposition before 'last friday' . the ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“A job that is near home” or “A job that is nearby home.”

I was confused by these two words "near" and "nearby". In both terms---"A job that is near home" and "A job that is nearby home." , I guess, they should be ok gramatically? But I have no idea with the ...
4
votes
4answers
369 views

Instead followed by preposition “to”

Can I use the preposition "to" after the word "instead" in a sentence? Example: let's say I'm in a situation where I bought an used computer that gave me a lot of problems and I want to say the ...
1
vote
2answers
75 views

Using “before” for relationships other than time

As I read books and posts on G+, I am confused from using of some adverbs of place and time. And why? Because some ones I have paired with time (for example before) are used as adverb of place. For ...
2
votes
1answer
723 views

He fell straight off (from) the ledge (right) in/to/into the pool

He fell straight off (from) the ledge (right) in/to/into the pool. Falling in/into the (swimming) pool doesn't seem to rely on any phrasal verb or idiom that I can see. Falling from something is not ...
2
votes
4answers
8k views

“Since” at the end of a sentence

I am confused with this and rarely see since put at the end of a sentence: There were the children to consider. She had told him she wanted a divorce two days ago, and neither of them had slept ...
3
votes
2answers
514 views

Sentence Transformation: not as …as

This type of vinyl is no substitute for leather. If I rewrite the given sentence as This type of vinyl is not as good substitution as leather. would it be correct?
4
votes
2answers
532 views

What's the meaning of “bounced right back”?

This is a passage from a novel: "It's those C-sections," Georgie's mom would say. As if Georgie had chosen to have two C-sections, as if she'd order them off the menu out of sheer laziness "I had ...
1
vote
2answers
1k views

Usage of “since” vs. “onward”

It has been accepted by Japan since 1950. It was accepted by Japan 1950 onward. It feels like to me that these sentence have the same meaning. I wonder if native speakers of English think so too....
0
votes
1answer
6k views

What does “straight out of” mean?

OP: "Mother dished the food up straight out of the saucepan" I only know what "straight out" means. It means FRANKLY or DIRECTLY. But when it adds "of" behind it, I just cannot figure out what does ...
0
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1answer
45 views

does it have missing word after “up and down”?

Does it have Missing word In the following sentence? If I were, would I have shooting pains up and down my left arm? I consider up and down an adverbial, but in this sentence it's more like a ...
3
votes
3answers
401 views

how to use the phrase “his study”

Original: It was a dark autumn night. The old banker was walking up and down his study and remembering how, fifteen years before, he ... Could you possibly show me which one is correct grammatically? ...
2
votes
1answer
8k views

DIfference between “at home” & “home” [duplicate]

Consider: She's home. She's at home. Are there any differences in meaning?