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44 views

But now he has come to

In the Orient Long Man's dictionary Word Master I have found the different uses of ' to' - as a preposition, to infinitive and an adverb The example is given for its use as an adverb He was ...
0
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0answers
36 views

“Besides” Vs “Plus” Vs “On top of that”

As you know, both of the adverbs "plus" and "besides" and also the idiom "on top of that" are all informal and a as far as I'm concerned, mean the same thing. (I know they have other meaning! I'm ...
0
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2answers
48 views

COUNTER-INTUITIVELY

I am trying to figure out what "counter intuitively" actually means but I just can't understand and perceive it. I searched up the dictionary and it says "counter intuitive" is "something that is ...
0
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1answer
22 views

What does “well” mean, in the phrase “well before”

The book "Moneyball: The Art of Winning an Unfair Game by By Michael Lewis" says But the idea for the book came well before I had good reason to write it – before I had a story to fall in love ...
0
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1answer
18 views

up/down for something

Words up and down are opposite to each other. But both up for something and down for something have the same meaning "willing to take part in something". How did this come into being? What is the ...
0
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1answer
2k views

What do ‘Slide Away’ and ‘Slide In’ mean?

These are famous lines from a song called Slide Away by Oasis ‘Slide away and give it all you've got’ ‘Slide in baby together we’ll fly’ and I have no clue what they mean. I'm always confused when ...
4
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1answer
71 views

Is it OK to use “slowly” after “to edge”?

I came across a sentence Why does a car have to edge forward slowly when turning from a side street into a main street? The use of slowly made me look up the definition of edge as a verb in a ...
5
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4answers
346 views

The meaning of “up” in the phrase “up in London”

He'd been to a lecture the previous night up in London. I looked it up in a dictionary. 'Up' as adverb has many meanings. Would you tell me if the meaning I chose is applied to the sentence? From ...
0
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1answer
43 views

Is “Last time we were in a house was five weeks” a common colloquialism?

There a scene in the movie Red Dawn: A group of teenagers come to a house and are welcomed in by the owner. One of the teenagers: Last time we were in a house was five weeks. Man: You look it....
2
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1answer
61 views

“Thus ignoring” meaning of thus in text?

Shaping Identity in Eastern Europe and Russia: Soviet and Polish Accounts of ... Authors of survey histories were criticized for focusing on interclass as opposed to intraclass conflict thus ...
0
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1answer
4k views

'going on' meaning

In some dictionary, I have read this example: "The amount of homework and other things he had going on was stressful." My question is about 'going on', what is it? and what does it mean? Thank you ...
1
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2answers
75 views

Using “before” for relationships other than time

As I read books and posts on G+, I am confused from using of some adverbs of place and time. And why? Because some ones I have paired with time (for example before) are used as adverb of place. For ...
0
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1answer
83 views

How do you say the probability of another planet like earth

We had a discussion about the meaning of "possible" and "probable" in the other question. I know possibility refers to "can", and probability refers to "likelihood", for example we may discuss if it ...
0
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2answers
802 views

How to decide the meaning of “Apparent”?

I was reading the meaning of the word apparent. I found that the word has two completely opposite meanings, 1. Easy to recognize that something is true. 2. Something seems to be true but might not be. ...
1
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2answers
507 views

Meaning of “ostensibly” [closed]

Does "ostensibly" mean "apparently", "apparently, but not actually" or "apparently, but (most likely) not actually"? If different meanings are possible, then which one is the most common? And how can ...
0
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2answers
113 views

how can we use “literally”? [closed]

What does literally exactly mean? I am not so clear about its meaning, and I often get confused.