Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

133 questions with no upvoted or accepted answers
Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
4
votes
0answers
68 views

Why is it “half as much” and not “a half as much”?

Why is it acceptable to say "It is half as much" but not "It is a half as much" When you can say: "It is a third as much" but not "It is third as much" What is ...
2
votes
1answer
17 views

“without” verb adverb position

How do we say this correctly: "you can't do that without doing this first" OR "you can't do that without first doing this"? Similary "I want you to do always your homework timely" "I want you to ...
2
votes
1answer
214 views

Order of adverb “immediately” in a phrase

I've been struggling with this aspect of the English language and i don't know if there are some rules to it that can help me. I've looked for answers on the internet but so far i haven't found ...
2
votes
1answer
5k views

“Will” vs “Maybe I will” and “I think I will”

Almost every English grammar book I`ve studied claims that "Will" is used to talk about plans decided at the moment of speaking. Sentences like "I will help you" or "I'll wait for you" give a strong ...
2
votes
1answer
16 views

Play your role the best

Is the following sentence correct In an imperfect world with not-so-perfect people and institutions, you have to play your role the best you can, take as many as you can along with you, with empathy ...
2
votes
1answer
315 views

“He won't (likely) be… so much… as for…” How can I paraphrase it?

He won't likely be remembered so much for his accomplishments as for his character. Is this sentence similar to the following? He will be remembered for his character rather than for his ...
2
votes
1answer
379 views

Can direct be used correctly as an adverb, and if so how is it different from directly?

I read this on the web: "International students can apply direct to the University of Western Sydney." How can "direct" which is a verb acts as an adverb? Is it possible ? Although I think it ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

He has been working on the problem for a long time but is still/yet not able to solve it

Sentence improvement: He has been working on the problem for a long time but is still not able to solve it. I believe this sentence is correct. But the answer to of this question is to place yet ...
1
vote
1answer
37 views

Does “right upstairs” mean “on the floor directly above”?

While making neighbours' acquaintances, people often use "right", as in "I live right next door / right across the street / right upstairs," etc. In "right next door", ...
1
vote
1answer
21 views

When not to use the preposition “to”

I'm going to Spain tomorrow. The last time I visited Spain it was great. After that, I will go home. Why don't English speakers say I'm going to home. I have visited to Spain. "To" would ...
1
vote
0answers
10 views

Special usage of verbs - like “to have [some property]” - in sentences

What is the "grammatical category" of "to have" in these contexts? We choose these words to have length at least two. He built this car to have better aerodynamic properties. ...
1
vote
0answers
19 views

the placement of adverb “not” for infinitive verbs

A recent article in Politico had the following title "Advisers almost universally encouraged Trump to not say much this week and urged him not to take questions on Friday after his first public ...
1
vote
1answer
32 views

escorted him firmly back to his seat

The flight attendants led the drunk man back to his seat, but just a few minutes later he had left his seat again. After a longer argument with the man, the flight attendants escorted him firmly back ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Does “up” act as a preposition in the following sentences?

"Put up the banner." "Make up your mind." I get the impression that "up" functions as an adverb or phrasal verb in both.
1
vote
0answers
55 views

What is “shut” in “close the door shut”?

I have heard the sentence "close the door shut" a lot. However I am not sure about the function of "shut". Is it an adverb or an adjective here? How do I parse this sentence? I am ...
1
vote
1answer
47 views

The position of the adverb “shockingly” changes the meaning

a. He shockingly used brilliant colors in these paintings. b. He used brilliant colors in these paintings shockingly. c. Brilliant colors were shockingly used. d. Brilliant colors were used shockingly....
1
vote
0answers
70 views

“operates similar to” vs. “operates similarly to”

I wonder which form(s) are correct amongst the following: It operates similar to the above-mentioned mechanism. It operates similarly to the above-mentioned mechanism. Looking at Google, "operates ...
1
vote
1answer
10 views

no one and no one else differences

She has no one else to look after her but me. She has no one to look after her but me. Which is correct? What is the difference between these two sentences?
1
vote
0answers
99 views

Either quiet or quietly

In the following sentence is quietly incorrectly used? I was surprised to see every student sitting quietly in the class, even though the teacher was not present According to my book quietly is ...
1
vote
0answers
32 views

Unabated can be adverb?

I think that rage is verb so the following word should be adv. —> unabatedly. Plus, rage isn’t linking v. 🤔 Thank you for your explanation in advance.
1
vote
1answer
19 views

Trying to undertand if a noun an be an adverb given the struture of a sentence

I'm trying to teach my 7 year old daughter English and am clearly failing given I'm asking a question here. The following sentence has me a little baffled in regards to the noun, verb and adverb. ...
1
vote
0answers
57 views

what is the role of “more” here?

1- It more than doubles during these day rather one year ago. 2- they have reached 50 or more doubles in a season. Are they adverb?
1
vote
1answer
18 views

the position of 'annually' in the 'as much amount of soybeans as' sentence

If you were to say the annual consumption of soybeans by one American is about the same as that by one Canadian, where would you place annually? [1] One American consumes about as much amount of ...
1
vote
2answers
19 views

Are con­junc­tions like “and” al­lowed be­fore a tran­si­tion word?

In this sen­tence, is it gram­mat­i­cally cor­rect to use and be­fore con­se­quently? He did not sub­mit the ap­pli­ca­tion by the dead­line and con­se­quently, his ap­pli­ca­tion was not con­sid­...
1
vote
1answer
251 views

Which part of speech is “left” in this sentence?

I've always thought (perhaps, erroneously) that if there is some ambiguity in determining whether the given word is an adjective or a past participle, you need to look at whether the "source" of ...
1
vote
2answers
96 views

What does “generally” refer to in this sentence?

We can see why the non-reductive understanding of the computational theory fits into scientific theorizing generally. What is the reference of "generally" exactly? Fits or theorizing?
1
vote
1answer
65 views

The river Thames last froze over three decades ago

I was solving a question for TOEIC prep, and found this sentence. The question was "The River Thames last ______ over three decades ago." 1. freeze 2. froze 3. frozen 4. freezing ...
1
vote
1answer
134 views

With indefinite noun phrase how can we say 'there' is an adverb?

There is a place, next to him, sit there. There is the place, next to him, sit there. Here is my question. We can use a definite noun phrase with 'there' when 'there' means 'in that place' , but in (...
1
vote
1answer
222 views

But vs Except usage

She has no one to look after her except me. She has no one to look after her but me. Which is correct? My grammar book says sentence2 is correct. What is the difference between BUT and EXCEPT ...
1
vote
3answers
96 views

Placement of ALSO in a sentence

She found her bag and money also. She found her bag and also money. Which is correct? My grammar book is saying sentence 2 is correct, as “ALSO” shouldn’t come at the end of the sentence. Why so?...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Balls A are circumferentially aligned with balls B

I created the sentence below in order to describe the image above: Red balls are circumferentially aligned with blue balls. But, after googled, I am afraid that the sentence may describe the image ...
1
vote
1answer
617 views

“simply can not be” or “can not simply be”

I am looking into adverb order in sentences and came across the following one; There are things in this world which simply cannot be expressed in the form of words. I think the above should better ...
1
vote
1answer
284 views

On a strictly cash basis

Can anyone explain why we say on a strictly cash basis (and not strict)? Is cash here an adjective? Is cash basis a noun phrase or compound noun?
1
vote
1answer
17 views

Adverb after very much

You helped me very much again. Is this sentence correct? If it is correct, does it sound kind of odd?
1
vote
1answer
665 views

why we need dummy subjects and it's usage?

There is a book on the table -- existential clause A book is on the table -- basic version A book is there -- (there= on the table, adverb of place) An existential clause is a clause that refers to ...
1
vote
3answers
58 views

The So and Such Choice

We can say: I know such a good place I heard we could also say: I know a so good place OR I know so good a place Is it true or not and how would it be if not and if yes and so on=)
0
votes
0answers
25 views

Applying adjective/adverb to nouns/verbs in a conjunction sentence

Take this simple sentence for example: I like dogs and cats. Which means I like dogs and I like cats. Simple. What if I add an adjective "big" before the word "dogs"?: I like big ...
0
votes
2answers
16 views

In the sentence “we always buy toilet paper in bulk”, does 'in bulk' function as an adverb or adjective?

Does in bulk modify buy as in we buy loads of toilet paper or does it elaborate on the number of toilet papers we buy? Is one way of seeing it less wrong than the other? Based on my intuition, I am ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

What kind of adverb is the word “most”?

I am analyzing a sentence where I have this phrase: They are the ones most affected. "Most" here is an adverb, isn't? So, what kind of adverb is it?
0
votes
0answers
20 views

-ing forms of verb. Gerund or participle? Adverb or Adjective?

I try to figure out these "-ing" forms in the following examples. They appears to be participles but not used as adjectives, and more like adverbs (complementing the action of the verbs). ...
0
votes
1answer
20 views

is to be used only vs is to be only used

I have some trouble with putting an adverb to a sentence. Which one is correct in the following sentences. This fire extinguisher is to be used only in an emergency. Or This fire extinguisher is to ...
0
votes
1answer
14 views

Please explain the use of the word Easy in this sentence

The tennis player, easy through the opening set against her opponent, rallied to take the final two sets for the biggest victory of her young career. Of the following pattern, which one is implied ...
0
votes
0answers
35 views

Which parts of speech do the following words belong to?

Who does he live with? The kids are playing outside. I couldn't find anyone to talk to. She died on the 5th and was buried the day after.
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Will I get marked down if I omit the same subject after adverb?

When using a conjunction("and" for example), we can always omit the identical subject so I am wondering whether it is possible to omit the same subject before adverb like "therefore&...
0
votes
1answer
19 views

Most as an adverb: before or after the main verb?

Is it acceptable to place "most" before the main verb like the sentence below? I will remember you for being strong but I will most remember you for being kind.
0
votes
0answers
31 views

Why is there used adverb?

I came across this sentence below: Judithe Hernandez’s art career began in Los Angeles during the socially and politically turbulent 1960s I know that adverb is mainly used to modify verb or ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

does anyone help me with the grammar structure of “XXX is likely to cause deaths, both proportionally and in absolute numbers.”

I appreciate any help you can provide. Which part is "both proportionally and in absolute numbers" modifying? Naturally, it should be "to cause," but here "to cause" is ...
0
votes
0answers
19 views

Can we use adverbs with comparative adjectives as in:

He is much taller than me. Vs He is incredibly taller than me. I know the first sentence is correct, but I was wondering if we could use Incredibly with a comparative adjective (taller).
0
votes
1answer
19 views

the position of “only” to emphasize the rareness

In the post meaning of "I have everything for my xxx" I said However, googling it only returns 3 hits. I was trying to emphasize the rareness of the searching results. Should I have put it ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

Correct use of “most” as an adverb

The following sentence is part of the transcript of an speech of a non-native person: “Which is a technique that advertisement companies most use it.” I think “most” is used in a grammatically wrong ...