The Stack Overflow podcast is back! Listen to an interview with our new CEO.

Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
1answer
15 views

Is there any difference between the phrase “all the better” and “so much the better”?

Is there any difference between the phrases? For example: If can come earlier, it is all the better. If can come earoier, it is so much the better. By the way do I have to inculde it is as ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

When can we use adverbs as subjects of sentences? Why “Down came the rain” instead of “the rain came down”?

See this "The Itsy Bitsy Spider" song The itsy-bitsy spider Climbed up the water spout Down came the rain And washed the spider out Out came the sun And dried up all the rain And the itsy-bitsy ...
4
votes
1answer
650 views

What is the “more” means here?

What does the "more" mean in the following sentence: HTTP is used to transport more the HTML, HTML from the browser to render the view. The picture source:
1
vote
1answer
23 views

Could have, Should have, Would have, Must have, Might have - Time Adverbs

When talking about past ability or possibility, we use could have or might have. When talking about past obligation or suggestion, we use should have. When talking about past strong guess, we use ...
2
votes
1answer
2k views

“Will” vs “Maybe I will” and “I think I will”

Almost every English grammar book I`ve studied claims that "Will" is used to talk about plans decided at the moment of speaking. Sentences like "I will help you" or "I'll wait for you" give a strong ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Is there any difference between “sideways” and “to the side”?

Is there any difference between sideways and to the side? For example: Stop leaning sideways/to the side! The car in front of us suddenly moved sideways/to the side. I feel that in the ...
0
votes
2answers
67 views

Can every adjective be after a noun?

I’ve heard that [noun] [adjective] equals [noun] [that is] [adjective]. But, then can every adjective be after a noun? She is a girl cute. This is a book interesting. The dog black is mine. ...
1
vote
2answers
63 views

What does “generally” refer to in this sentence?

We can see why the non-reductive understanding of the computational theory fits into scientific theorizing generally. What is the reference of "generally" exactly? Fits or theorizing?
1
vote
2answers
43 views

The correct order of adverbs

I can't figure out which is the correct order of adverbs in the sentences below. We met each other in the subway by chance yesterday. We met each other by chance in the subway yesterday. Could you ...
1
vote
4answers
60 views

Can 'whole' be used as an adverb?

It rained the whole week except on Sunday. In this question is the word 'whole' an adverb? Or since the word 'week' is a noun, will it become a determiner?
0
votes
2answers
37 views

Any more\anymore\any longer\no longer\ no more

I wanted to say a sentence below but I made whole 5 variants of how it could be said. Do they really mean the same or the differ somehow? 1) From what shelf will people not be taking milk any ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

meaning: do something together

Does the following sentence make sense? This doesn't seem be a grammar question. Neither John nor I am having dinner together. I'd appreciate your help.
0
votes
1answer
96 views

Usage of ''as'' before adjective

Can I use "as" to make adjective into adverb like examples below: 1) I always think as different from other people. 2) I always think differently from other people. Are both sentences have same ...
1
vote
1answer
124 views

On a strictly cash basis

Can anyone explain why we say on a strictly cash basis (and not strict)? Is cash here an adjective? Is cash basis a noun phrase or compound noun?
1
vote
1answer
15 views

The word “late” means “till a later time”

I got up late today. Here the word late means at a later time than usual and the opposite of early. Now, I worked late at work today. He stayed up late last night. Are these sentences fine ...
2
votes
2answers
1k views

“For at least” vs. “at least for” ?

What do you prefer, or which one is more acceptable; putting the adverbs or phrases before the preposition, or after. He has been jailed at least/nearly for 5 years. He has been jailed for at ...
0
votes
1answer
98 views

“surely” vs. “really"

This really looks bad. vs. This surely looks bad. What is the difference between the adverbs surely and really? Don’t they both lay emphasis on certainity? Also: You surely do know how ...
3
votes
1answer
20k views

“Wrote it wrong” or “wrote it wrongly”?

Which is grammatically correct? He wrote it wrong. He wrote it wrongly.
0
votes
1answer
11 views

Used to VS Before VS Earlier

If we talk about some actions which were happening in the past and don't happen anymore, we can use "used to": I used to smoke We can say the same without "used to" but with "before": I smoked ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

What is 'always' modifying?

There's always somebody at home in the evenings. We're not always this busy! Ellie always was very good at art. I think it is modifying 'is, are, was'. Can't I think 'is, are, was' mean '...
1
vote
1answer
301 views

“as great as has”

Which sentence is more correct and why? Einstein is as great a scientest as HAS ever lived. Or, Einstein is as great a scientist as ever lived.
0
votes
0answers
24 views

I exactly will come\ I will exactly come

I got a little stuck with "exactly" in the word order: Don't doubt about me, I will exactly come to the party! Where should I put it? Can it be: Don't doubt about me, I exactly will come to the ...
0
votes
0answers
26 views

rather A than B vs A rather than B vs more of A than B

Does the position of "rather" make a difference in a comparison? For instance, is there any difference between the following sentences? He is rather a writer than a politician. He is a writer rather ...
0
votes
1answer
23 views

More Happily… right or wrong

"Happily keeping a 4.0 GPA, more happily done with that class" Is this sentence grammatically correct? It sounds wrong but might be right. Please help.
0
votes
2answers
51 views

When to use “I” or “I am”

I've been having some texting with someone else. None of us are English native speakers, but we are both pretty advanced. She thinks I'm more advanced than her, although I think I just have more ...
1
vote
1answer
15 views

the position of 'annually' in the 'as much amount of soybeans as' sentence

If you were to say the annual consumption of soybeans by one American is about the same as that by one Canadian, where would you place annually? [1] One American consumes about as much amount of ...
0
votes
3answers
45 views

Which sentence is “however” contrasting in this context?

Now research shows the night is getting even brighter. From 2012 to 2016 the earth's artificially lit area expanded by an estimated 2.2 percent a year (map), according to a study published last ...
2
votes
1answer
35 views

Is there an adjective that means “elsewhere”?

Let's say we have an example: Sorry, I just meant something I observe in elsewhere discussions, not in our past topics Since elsewhere is an adverb, not adjective, the example is ungrammatical. "...
0
votes
2answers
24 views

Verb + object + to sb + adjective

Our own identities were simply given to us complete. Why doesn’t the adverb ‘completely’ comes, but adjective ‘complete’ to the end of the sentence above? Is it because that ‘complete’ modify the ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Order of adverb “immediately” in a phrase

I've been struggling with this aspect of the English language and i don't know if there are some rules to it that can help me. I've looked for answers on the internet but so far i haven't found ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Meaning of the adverb “especially” after a subject in context

Tell me please what especially means in the following sejtence. All my family likes music. My father, especially, goes to as many concerts as he possiblay can. I would get it if there were the ...
0
votes
2answers
51 views

He lives as he wants

Which is correct? He lives as he wants He lives how he wants
0
votes
1answer
42 views

How to use the verb “play”?

A class has particularly enjoyed a film and want to see it again. Could they ask their teacher: "Could you play it again please?"
0
votes
1answer
71 views

Why, speaking of a colonoscopy, does it say “they put it up your bottom” and not “they put it up through your bottom”?

This is a piece of dialogue about a colonoscopy from the series "Outnumbered" s03e03: — Yes, but how does it get inside your insides? — Well, they put it up your bottom. Why not "they put it ...
0
votes
2answers
12 views

“Straight up and down” meaning

A dictionary defines the word vertical adj as: straight up and down. So can I say someone draw a line that is straight up and down? Can the word horizontal mean straight from side to side? Please ...
0
votes
1answer
43 views

Truly VS really

1>Mahatma Gandhi was really a great man 1>Mahatma Gandhi was truly a great man If somebody says I have got job . we say really? but not truly? we say the question paper is reallydifficult but ...
3
votes
1answer
31 views

Why the adverb “lately” is sometimes used with the present progressive?

The following example is from this video. It is at 5 minutes and 48 seconds. You are killing it lately. I am confused because as this dictionary says the adverb is usually used with perfect tenses,...
1
vote
1answer
2k views

Is “without” a preposition or an adverb in “She left the hotel without paying the bill”?

She left the hotel without paying the bill. How do I tell if a particular word is a preposition or an adverb when it is attached to a verb?
0
votes
1answer
2k views

I've always been able to vs I always have been able to

what is the difference between the two sentences? I have always been or I always have been
1
vote
2answers
86 views

Difference between “free now” and “now free”?

What is the difference between "free now" and "now free" ? For example- "It is free now" "It is now free" What is the differences between these two sentences verbally ? Some say, "now free" ...
0
votes
1answer
59 views

Rules: conjunctive adverbs

Below is a sentence from yourdictionary.com There has been an increase in greenhouse gases, therefore global warming is happening. (Depending on a writer) Which can be rewritten as: 1)- There has ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Use of “in” to show form of something

Use of “in” to show form of something confuses me. I mean can it be used in every structure while identifying form of something. Would the sentence below be correct ? New fish oils will be in pill ....
1
vote
2answers
45 views

it was six months away

a. It was six months away from his graduation from college. b. It was six months from his graduation from college. c. He was six months away from graduating from college. d. He was six ...
0
votes
1answer
203 views

Can we use a subordinate conjunction after the conjunctive adverb?

1."It is not always necessary,however, we use it to link two parts of that instrument". ‘However’ can be used to join two simple sentences to make a compound sentence. But in (1) there is a mistake ...
0
votes
3answers
103 views

Chinese people are trying to learn their babies' gender by looking at the calendar before they are born

My question is about the location of "before" and "by". I am not sure which one should be close to "learn". Chinese people are trying to learn their babies' gender by looking at the calendar ...
1
vote
1answer
112 views

With indefinite noun phrase how can we say 'there' is an adverb?

There is a place, next to him, sit there. There is the place, next to him, sit there. Here is my question. We can use a definite noun phrase with 'there' when 'there' means 'in that place' , but in (...
1
vote
1answer
268 views

Why “much” + adjective is wrong while “much” + comparative is right?

I would like to ask for your opinion on why much can not describe a normal adjective while it can describe a comparative form of an adjective. For instance, the sentence 1, 2 are wrong while 3, 4 are ...
0
votes
0answers
18 views

“As I said it earlier” or “As I said it before”?

Tell me please which one of the following sentences is correct, and if the are both correct, then is there any difference in meaning? As I said it earlier he was not going to win. As I said it ...
1
vote
1answer
26 views

(Run him over / Run over him) Which is correct?

He was run over by a truck. So, in this case which is correct? a. A truck ran him over. b. A truck ran over him. I think 'over' in 'a' sentence is adverb and 'over' in 'b' sentence is ...
1
vote
1answer
44 views

But now he has come to

In the Orient Long Man's dictionary Word Master I have found the different uses of ' to' - as a preposition, to infinitive and an adverb The example is given for its use as an adverb He was ...