Questions tagged [adverbs]

An adverb is a word that modifies an adjective, adverb, phrase, or sentence, expressing some relation of manner, or quality.

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11
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3answers
5k views

“I only teach you” vs. “I teach only you” vs. “I teach you only”

I only teach you. I teach only you. I teach you only. I think that all the sentences have same meaning, but my teacher says that they are different from each other. I think that the ...
12
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7answers
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“waterway … flowed sombre” - Should Joseph Conrad have used an adverb, not an adjective?

SPOILER ALERT: This question asks about the last line of Heart of Darkness by Joseph Conrad. If you are reading the novel, you may want to skip this question. Should an adverb (i.e. sombrely) have ...
4
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2answers
3k views

“I have sent it to X too” vs. “I have sent it to X also”

I have sent this e-mail to Aman also. I have sent this e-mail to Aman too. Which one is correct? What is the exact difference between the two? Please explain.
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7answers
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“I’m too tired to drive”: Why does removing 'too' make this sentence ungrammatical?

This is grammatical: I'm too tired to drive. but this isn't: I'm tired to drive. Why? How can removing an adverb make a sentence ungrammatical? In a sentence like “He slowly walked down the ...
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3answers
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Usage of 'quick' as adverb

I heard the following dialog in a British English movie: Words go round quick. All the little tongues go clack, clack, clack. What does this mean, and why was the word "quick" used instead of "...
6
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4answers
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“Stay home” or “stay at home” – which is correct and why? [duplicate]

Stay home. Stay at home. When "home" functions as an adverb, it can modify the verb "stay". There are other examples, such as "go home",but there is no expression: Go to home. So I wonder ...
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4answers
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what is the difference between “yet” and “still”?

what is the difference between "yet" and "still"? When we can use "still"? and when we can use "yet"? Are they synonyms or not? "The plan could yet succeed." Can I use "still" in that sentence ...
6
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3answers
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Can an 'adverb' modify 'nouns/pronouns'?

While answering to this question here, very interesting discussion took place with CopperKettle. It's absolutely right that adverbs modify many things, but nouns/pronouns. But then, expressions ...
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2answers
834 views

Does “It snowed hard Monday” require an “on”?

I came across an English learner writing It snowed hard Monday. After saying that it didn't snow on Friday and Saturday. It didn't quite feel right to me. I'd be okay with It snowed hard. or ...
8
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3answers
659 views

Is “further” really used as synonym of “farther”?

The OALD, for the meaning of further says: (comparative of far) (especially BrE) at or to a greater distance SYN farther Is further really used as synonym of farther? As far as I recall, there is ...
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4answers
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Why is 'where' an adverb and not a pronoun?

A: Where are you going? B: I am going to school. Where took the place of school and something that takes the place of a noun is a pronoun. So, why isn't where a pronoun?
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5answers
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“nearby” (close by) as an adjective, a preposition, or an adverb

Would you show me if there could be any potential difference semantically between the two? Please, would you possibly take into account the bounds of possibility that the word "nearby" in the ...
6
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3answers
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Where is the correct place to place adverbs in sentences?

I am always confused about where to put adverbs in sentences. For example, consider the questions below: Why did they target us specifically? Why did they target specifically us? Why did ...
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3answers
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Tag question of negative form

Positive statements that contain adverbs never, rarely, hardly are treated as negative statements She can rarely come this week, can she? He never visits you again, does he? How about this ...
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2answers
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by doing it VS. in doing so

Although I almost know what in doing so means, actually, I am wondering whether or not by doing this/that et cetera, could mean the same meaning as the former. Thanks in advance
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3answers
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3 sentences with “only” [duplicate]

I only play tennis in the summer. I play tennis only in the summer. I play tennis in the summer only. It there any difference in these 3 sentences?
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4answers
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Is this sentence grammatically correct? “You are so offended”

Is this sentence grammatically correct? You are so offended. (Since offended is adjective in past tense)
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5answers
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“firstly … secondly …” or “first … second … ”?

Suppose I am enumerating reasons not to fly. Is it then correct to write/say: Firstly, I prefer the train because I can see the landscape. Secondly, I have control over my luggage, and thirdly, it ...
17
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6answers
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How do I use “also” in a sentence?

Which of the following sentences are grammatically correct in written text? You also are allowed to see your son. You are also allowed to see your son. Also, you are allowed to see your son. ...
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6answers
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'Ask away' - what does 'away' mean?

“Sir,” said Harry, reminding himself irresistibly of Voldemort, “I wanted to ask you something.” “Ask away, then, my dear boy, ask away. . . .” In this sentence, I don't know what does 'away' ...
9
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5answers
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How can I figure out whether a word is an adverb or an adjective?

How can we confirm the word modifying an adjective is an adverb which may well be adjective sometimes? In this sentence, what are the parts of speech of 'bright' and 'red'? She wore a bright red ...
4
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1answer
108 views

Why should one use “back” in these examples?

Back at home, it was so dim. I used to play football back in my school days. We used to eat by hands back in my country. Is back optional in these sentences or does it change their ...
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2answers
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“Not enough memory” vs. “no enough memory”

Which is correct? Why? Not enough memory No enough memory The first variant seems to be significantly more popular on the Internet than the second one. I want to use such construction as an error ...
16
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3answers
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Are words ending in -ly adverbs?

Adverbs often end in -ly. But the word friendly is not an adverb, is it? A friendly advice is incorrect, but a friendly person is correct. Is the word friendly very unusual or are there many non-...
3
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1answer
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“Wrote it wrong” or “wrote it wrongly”?

Which is grammatically correct? He wrote it wrong. He wrote it wrongly.
2
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1answer
9k views

DIfference between “at home” & “home” [duplicate]

Consider: She's home. She's at home. Are there any differences in meaning?
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2answers
223 views

Is ‘upside down’ a depictive adjunct for ‘a note’?

“...and from yet another pocket inside his overcoat he pulled an owl -- a real, live, rather ruffled-looking owl - a long quill, and a roll of parchment. With his tongue between his teeth he ...
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1answer
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'Call up' - what does 'up' mean?

call up : to make a phone call to a person or a place Call up and make a reservation for eight o'clock. Can you call up for me and tell them I'm sick? In these sentences, I don't know what does '...
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3answers
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The Times is a highly (respected or respectable) journal?

What is the correct usage? The Times is a highly (respected or respectable) journal. And if we changed the sentence to this, would you change your choice? The Times is a highly (respected or ...
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3answers
2k views

'Such [something/someone]' OR 'Such a [something/someone]' -Any diference?

Is there any difference between 'such a something/one' and 'such something/one'? He is such fool over He is such a fool Is the former one possible in any context or style? If the article is ...
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1answer
14k views

Word order: “10 minutes more” or “10 more minutes”?

I'm still packing my clothes. I'll need 10 minutes more. I'm still packing my clothes. I'll need 10 more minutes. Are both grammatically correct?
0
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1answer
839 views

When to use comma after time adverbs

I am trying to say sentences like: Then by doing this thing, this happens Now after selecting this option, this happens By doing this, now we can do this Should they get comma after "...
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1answer
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other explanations of as early as?

Would you please rephrase this so I can better understand it? The money could be paid as early as next week. What other meanings might "as early as" take on in different situations or ...
7
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2answers
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The night before last night?

I could say "I am leaving the day after tomorrow," but what if I want to reference the night before last night? Do I say, "I left the night before last night"? What do native speakers say both ...
6
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3answers
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Is “deep” an adjective or adverb?

She worked quickly but without hurry. She put an old apron to cover her clothes. In the basement she found a jelly jar with a top and carried it out to the carriage house where the tools were kept. In ...
5
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3answers
43k views

“By the time” = “Before”?

By the time he comes, we will have already left. Have I correctly reworded the sentence above? Before he comes, we will have already left.
4
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1answer
20k views

“What do you care?”

  "I'm leaving anyway."   "What the hell are you talking about?"   I can't answer. I can't tell him that not only have I disgraced myself beyond belief or ...
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3answers
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“Most everyone” versus “mostly everyone”?

Saying "most everyone" is much more popular in books than "mostly everyone". To compute the distance between two coordinates most everyone/mostly everyone uses the Spherical Law of Cosines equation....
7
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2answers
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When does “though” act as an adverb?

As I know, the word "though" doesn't need a comma before it (at the end of a sentence) if it's an adverb. How do I know if "though" is acting as an adverb? A few examples would be good! I've looked ...
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3answers
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Can we say “Let's have a beer meanwhile they play tennis”?

I am a bit confused on how to use "meanwhile". I know you can use it as a connector. Meanwhile, I did not notice I see dictionary.com says: noun meantime. adverb in the ...
6
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2answers
484 views

Are there places where we can't use 'much', but 'very much' is OK?

I think there are cases when you can use very much but not much: I would very much like to meet him. *I would much like to meet him. I don't know what grammar rule addresses this ...
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2answers
652 views

Why “think bright” is used with adjective instead of adverb (think brightly)? [duplicate]

I find "think bright" is much more common usage, but why? In my opinion, "Think" is a verb, so it is reasonable to use adverb to describe it. Examples: THINK BRIGHT! The National University ...
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3answers
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The usage of “regardless of”

Do my sentences sound natural? Do I use "regardless of" correctly? Regardless of how developed it is, every country has certain amount of rate poverty. Every country has certain amount of rate ...
2
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2answers
475 views

Fast and Quickly; adverbs

Which of the two following sentences is more appropriate to say: You must write fast. You must write quickly. I know the answer, but I need to explain it to somebody. It would be of great help ...
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3answers
576 views

Which “nor” is right? inversion or not?

Most problem children neither like school nor do they feel comfortable there. Most problem children neither like school nor feel comfortable there. Would you please tell me which one is correct?
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2answers
18k views

“Pretty” versus “quite” [duplicate]

Is there any difference between using pretty, and quite, in the following sentences? I am pretty good at playing soccer. I am quite good at playing soccer. How are you? I am quite well. ...
6
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2answers
410 views

Absent any verb, when can you use an adverb?

dualism = {mass noun} 1. The division of something conceptually into two opposed or contrasted aspects, or the state of being so divided I know that definitions don't have to be written as complete ...
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3answers
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Meaning and the position of “all” in a sentence

All my friends answered my questions in the class yesterday. Every one of my friends answered my questions... My friends all answered my questions in the class yesterday. Each one answered my ...
5
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1answer
630 views

'not everyone is prepared' : Is 'not' a determiner?

Despite the overnight detention of Thailand's ousted prime minister Yingluck Shinawatra and a number of family members and politicians, there are indications today that not everyone is prepared to ...
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1answer
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'I, too, am waiting …' and 'I, also, am waiting …'

Kitty: I'm waiting for a banana. Jair: I, too, am waiting for a banana. (1) Jair: I, also, am waiting for a banana. (2) Which is correct, (1) or (2)? If both, what's the difference? Plus, ...